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Top 15 Hagen Dental Testimonials

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

We are very proud of patients’ satisfaction. While difficult to narrow down to just 15, here are some of our top patient reactions we wanted to share with you.

  1. “The Best Dental Care”

“Hagen Dental has given me the best dental care I’ve ever had. I’m just sorry I didn’t discover them sooner.” – Barb

  1. “…Couldn’t Be Happier!”

“I have been a patient at Hagen Dental Practice for 6+ years, and couldn’t be happier! Whenever you go into the office it’s always clean and inviting. The staff is friendly and treats you like family whether you’ve been a patient for years or a new patient. I would recommend this dentist to anyone new to town or just looking for a cange in dentistry. You can’t go wrong!” – Lauren O.

  1. “The Best Care”

“I couldn’t be happier with Dr. Hagen and the wonderful staff at Hagen Dental Practice. I lost my front tooth at 24 years old and everyone gave the best care to remedy the situation.” – Dani

  1. “Family Friendly Atmosphere with Leading Edge Dental Technology”

“I’ve been with Hagen Dental since Dr. Hagen took over the practice a long time ago, and I continue to rave about their ability to combine the friendly family atmosphere of the entire staff with leading edge dental technology. I live over 25 miles away, but wouldn’t think of trusting my care to anyone but Hagen Dental.” – Ron J.

  1. “I Always Brag About the Entire Staff…”

“When I come here I feel like a celebrity, important. I always brag about the entire staff. Definitely satisfied.” – Ken

  1. “I Enjoy My Smile Due to Hagen Dental”

“I have been very happy at Hagen Dental. They have a friendly and experienced staff and I enjoy my smile due to Hagen Dental.” – George

  1. “You Will Love Them Too”

“Hagen Dental Practice is great! I’m greeted with smiles as soon as I walk in the door.   I have been seeing Dr Hagen for a long time now and he is very easy to talk to about any concerns I may have. He makes procedures as painless as possible and is very good with any special needs I may have. I’m 68 and still have all my teeth including a baby tooth that I never lost. I attribute my good dental health to Dr Hagen and all of his caring staff. If you are looking for a good dentist try Hagen Dental Practice. I’m sure you will love them too.” Dianne L.

  1. “Every Person Goes that Extra Mile”

“I just left from my first experience with Dr. Hagen and his team. This is one of those rare places where EVERY person you come in contact with is friendly, knowledgeable and goes that extra mile to make make you feel welcome. Thanks so much for a wonderful appointment. I already know I’ve made a great choice by coming here.” – Darren H.

  1. “State of the Art”

“I’ve been a patient for a number of years. The staff is very accommodating and friendly. The equipment is state of the art. Enjoy making visits.” – Diane

  1. “I Have Been a Patient Here my Entire Life”

I have been a patient here my entire life and would not consider going to another dental practice. They have a great staff, great equipment, and Dr. Hagen is a great guy who really cares about his patients.” – Craig B.

  1. “Visits to the Dentist are a Pleasure”

“I have been a patient over 25 years. Dr. Hagen and all his staff are always professional, caring people. They help me take good care of my teeth. Visits to the dentist are a pleasure. They keep up with the latest in dental care. I don’t live in the area and drive across town to continue to be a patient.” – Regina

  1. “Like Seeing Old Friends”

“The comfortable atmosphere, friendly faces, and the personal references make the experience all the more enjoyable. Like seeing old friends!” – Penny

  1. “An Incredible Team with an Excellent Doctor”

“This is an incredible team with an excellent Doctor who really know what their doing but more importantly create comfort and care every step of the way. They are top notch. I recommend them wholly.” – Melinda H.

  1. “Helped Me Deal with Sleep Apnea”

“I just wanted to take a minute to thank Dr. Hagen and his staff for all their efforts in getting me caught up on my dental care. Thanks to your help I’ve finally got teeth and gums operating where they should be. The additional care getting me up with a dental appliance to deal with sleep apnea and snoring has made both my wife and me very happy!” – Ron

  1. “…The Latest Techniques & Technology”

“I always feel like I get the most up to date care possible with the latest techniques and technology. Dr. Hagen and his staff are always friendly and extremely competent!”– Mike

If you are ready to start going to the dentist regularly again, or if you simply need a new dentist, give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit us at hagendds.com

“Look Mom, No Cavities”: Here’s 10 Vintage Dental Ads You Don’t Want to Miss

Thursday, October 29th, 2015
5 times active

The promise of clean, fresh breath all day.

Tooth kit

Just look what 39 cents could get you in 1953!

acid fur

This one refers to “acid fur”!

baby ad

Can you believe this one?

do as your dentist

So direct!

duty

According to this ad, keeping you oral health up to par is what they call “keeping fit” and “America’s duty”!

Look mom no cavities advert

“No cavities!”

pass up the girl

Oh no! We don’t think we’d see this ad today! Here is one aimed at the ladies.

enamel

This Colgate ad talks about how nature can’t replace your enamel.

whiskey tooth paste

This ad is for genuine whiskey toothpaste!

These may be vintage ads, but we offer the latest, state-of-the-art technology and services at Hagen Dental. Learn more about our practice here and give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule an appointment.

Sources These Were Taken From:

  • http://www.smilegeneration.com/cerec

Meet Hagen Dental’s Newest Team Member, Brandi Stemen

Friday, September 18th, 2015

Hagen Dental Cincinnati West Side Dentist

Name: Brandi Stemen. Most my friends and family call e “Brandie Rae.” (Rae is my middle name.)

Role: I am an Expanded Functions Dental Assistant. I would describe my role not only as an EFDA, but as an assistant that can bring quality care to my patients. I love making my patients feel comfortable at all times while they are in the office and giving them a positive experience.

Favorite restaurant in Cincinnati: I have quite a few favorite restaurants in Cincinnati but I think my number one choice would be Wild Mikes (in Delhi).

How long you have lived in Cincinnati? In November, it will be 2 years. I a from a small town outside of Dayton, Ohio, so it was quite an adjustment moving to the big city but I love it.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? Some things I enjoy doing outside of work are spending time with my friends and family. I also enjoy attending Cincinnati sporting events such as UC football and basketball games, and Red’s games.

How would you describe the Hagen Dental team? The Hagen Dental team is a great team to work on. I knew the moment I walked into the office that I had to work here. The whole team is so warm, welcoming, and made me feel like I had been a part of the team for years. Everyone works as hard as they can to make the office run smoothly while providing quality care for our patients.

Hagen Dental is about total health. How do you stay healthy? To stay healthy, I focus on my fitness quite a bit which includes going to the gym 5-6 days a week. Everyone calls me crazy because I prefer to go to the gym before work so I wake up every morning at 4:30 AM.

What’s your favorite part of your job? My favorite part of my job would be the relationships I am able to build with my patients. I love getting to know my patients, and making them feel comfortable.

Finish this sentence: Hagen Dental patients… Will receive a lifetime of quality care when they step into our office.

Ready to come by our office and meet the Hagen Dental team? Visit our website to find out more or call (513) 251-5550 today. We can’t wait to meet you!

Race and Be Happy: How the Hagens Are Staying Healthy

Friday, August 28th, 2015

staying healthy at hagen dentalWe talk a lot about total health, and part of that is maintaining healthy habits that include exercising regularly.

Exercising, or finding physical training of some kind, can help us control weight, keep us in shape, combat disease, boost energy, promote sleep, and it can also provide a way for us to socialize and work on completing a goal.

Those are all positives in terms of our total health and well-being!

Training for an upcoming race can show us just how capable our bodies really are when it comes to achieving goals we set for ourselves.

Right now, the Hagen family is in-training for two races: Dr. Hagen will be participating in the Sunflower Revolution Ride in September, and Jenny Hagen will be running in the Columbus Marathon (by Nationwide Children’s Hospital) in October.

The Sunflower Revolution Ride

The Sunflower Revolution Ride, taking place in Yeatman’s Cove at Sawyer Point Park here in Cincinnati, Ohio, will benefit the Gardner Family Center for Parkinson’s Disease. “Riding for research, treatment, and a cure for Parkinson’s disease is what it’s all about. The Sunflower Revolution is making it fun to do so,” says the website. Also according to the website, more than $40,000 has already been raised for the cause!

racing quoteThe Most Meaningful Marathon: The Columbus Marathon

Jenny is training for a 26.2-mile race (a marathon) that will take place in Columbus, Ohio. It’s been called “the most meaningful marathon in country,” because each mile is actually dedicated to a “Patient Champion.” This means each mile presents a new story, a new inspiration, and another reason for runners to keep running! There will also be 1 Angel Mile to honor the children who have already run their race, and 1 Encore Mile featuring all the patients who have lined the course since 2012. What’s great is that the marathon will also benefit Nationwide Children’s.

Dr. Hagen and Jenny have been quite busy with training this Summer as they prepare to take on the physical and mental challenges of these two races.

How are you training or what races are you looking forward to in the coming months? Connect with us on Facebook here for more healthy lifestyle tips and education.

All About Lucy Hobbs Taylor, The First Woman DDS With the Cincinnati Connection

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Lucy Hobbs was born on March 14, 1833 in New York. Consider life then: Andrew Jackson was President, and at this time, most people lived in rural locations. Life was much shorter, with a life expectancy between 40 and 50 years old. Clothes were made by hand. This is even during a time when there was no indoor plumbing in rural areas!

Fast-forward more than 20 years, and Hobbs began her career as a teacher. She then made the move to Cincinnati, Ohio in 1859.

cincinnati dentist

Lucy Beaman Hobbs Taylor. Photo courtesy of kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. For some, the name may sound a bit familiar: that’s because a scrubs and lab coat company, designed and named one of their lab coats after Hobbs Taylor. Called the Lucy H.T. Lab Coat, the company says they named the line of apparel after her “tribute to this amazing, prestigious, and accomplished woman.”

She wanted to become a dentist. She’s reported to have said that she wanted “to enter a profession where [I] could earn [my] bread not alone by the sweat of [my] brow, but by the use of [my] brains also.”

At first, she was refused admission because she was female. No woman had ever graduated dentistry school before at this point in US history, although about 4 years prior a woman named Emeline Roberts Jones became the first woman to practice dentistry. (She had been married to a dentist, and he allowed her to be his assistant.)

But Hobbs did not give up on her dream. Jonathan Taft, Dean of the Ohio College of Dental Surgery is said to have welcomed Hobbs into his office until another dentist agreed to teach her.

Hobbs began her own private program of study and soon made up her mind she would also have her own practice one day.

A Cincinnati Connection

After learning from her mentor and eventually receiving a doctorate in dentistry, despite being refused initially by the school, she started her practice in Cincinnati, making Dr. Lucy—as her patients called her—the first official woman in the US to do so.

People were amazed when they learned that a young girl had wanted to study dentistry, she explained at the time. Things sure have changed since that time!

She would then make the move to the state of Iowa to practice dentistry. By 1865, she had earned the respect of her peers who allowed her to join the Iowa State Dental Society. “The profession has nothing in its pursuits foreign to the instincts of women,” asserted the Dental Society at the time. The move helped reinforce the idea that woman could be involved in the dental industry.

Later in life, she married a railroad car painter named James M. Taylor. Ever the persuasive person, she then convinced him that he should become a dentist alongside her. After he agreed, they practiced dentistry in Lawrence, Kansas. Speaking about these years, she’s quoted as saying, “I am a New Yorker by birth, but I love my adopted country—the West. To it belongs the credit of making it possible for women to be recognized in the dental profession on equal terms with men.”

After her husband died, Hobbs Taylor took on campaigns that supported women’s rights. Less than 20 years after she became the first woman to graduate dentistry school, the American Association of Women Dentists honored Hobbs Taylor by establishing the Lucy Hobbs Taylor Award. This award is now presented annually to an American Association of Women Dentists member in recognition of professional excellence and achievements in advancing the role of women in dentistry.

It’s reported that by 1900, ten years before Hobbs Taylor’s death, about one thousand other woman followed Hobbs Taylor’s footsteps in becoming involved in the field of dentistry. Thanks in part to pioneer women such as Hobbs Taylor who refused to give up on their dreams when first told “no,” hundreds of thousands of women have been able to participate in the field of dentistry since.

When she died, her obituary captured her local legacy, saying she was “one of the most striking figures of Lawrence [who] occupied a position of honor and ability, and for years she occupied a place high in the ranks of her profession.”

First a pioneer, then a dentist, and then a mentor, Lucy Hobbs Taylor changed the face of dentistry, and even though her name isn’t necessarily widely recognized, the first woman DDS still did have a meaningful impact on history.

References

  • http://dent.umich.edu/about-school/sindecuse-museum/lucy-beaman-hobbs-taylor-first-woman-dds
  • http://home.comcast.net/~thorsdag/LucyHobbsTaylor.html

Happy National Dentist Day

Friday, March 6th, 2015

It’s our kind of day today! We hope you have a day full of smiles.

Hagen Dental Cincinnati Happy National Dentist Day

Top Questions: Your Child’s Oral Health

Friday, September 19th, 2014

childrens dentist cincinnati ohio hagen

This week we answer 4 questions about children’s oral health.

1. Can my children have the kind of tooth sensitivity I have?

When adults have tooth sensitivity, the medical term for it is “dentin hypersensitivity.” If you’ve been reading our blog, you’d know that it’s a result of gum recession or exposed roots. (This kind of teeth sensitivity is often caused by improper brushing habits, gum disease or early stages of gum disease, and it can be made worse by what we eat or drink.)

To answer the question, however, it’s pretty unlikely your kids will experience this kind of uncomfortable feeling when they go to eat their favorite foods, or hot/cold drinks.

If they do mention having some kind of tooth or gum sensitivity, it might be from a cavity, which is of course a major source of sensitivity or pain!

What else might be causing some kind of sensitivity?

If a tooth breaks or cracks, our kids can also have some discomfort.

Look to make sure your children are not biting on ice, using their teeth as tools (biting things open, etc.), and make sure they wear a mouth guard when they play sports.  If they show resistance to wearing a mouth guard, remind them of how common it is for professional athletes to now wear mouth guards! It can save their teeth (not to mention prevent damage to their jaw), so it’s definitely worth getting into the habit of wearing.

These are ways to prevent some of the most common ways we can crack or break our teeth, but even with these precautions, our children may experience discomfort in their mouth, or they may unfortunately experience injury to their mouth in general. Be sure to bring them in to us to discuss all their options if either is the case.

2. I know the value of going to the dentist, but why do we need to bring our young children in for regular visits?

Of course you want your children to have confidence when it comes to their entire health…and that includes confidence when it comes to smiling—both now and in the coming years. Our kids learn a lot of positive dental habits at a young age, and the idea of going to the dentist fits into this category as well.

But also recall that the most common childhood disease is actually cavities or tooth decay. Going to the dentist is one of the key ways we can look to prevent this with our children.

Find that difficult to believe?

Tooth decay actually affects one in four kids in the US that are between the age of 2 and 5. When you look at children a bit older, between 12 and 15, that ratio jumps to one in two, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since this kind of tooth decay can typically be prevented with habits and dietary choices, it goes to show how starting early is important.

It’s also possible that if baby teeth do decay, and as a result fall out sooner than they would have normally, the adult teeth don’t have as much room as they should when they come in!

That’s just one more reason to come visit the dentist, right alongside your other childhood doctor visits.

3. My child appears to be grinding their teeth. What should I do?

Come in and see us! Without giving specific recommendations, in general, we want to treat a child who is grinding their teeth differently in order to protect their teeth over time.

This may require wearing a custom appliance or mouth guard at night, but we’d also want to better determine what could be the cause of the teeth grinding. It’s good that these types of behaviors are being identified, but it’s also a situation where you should come in to the office to speak with Dr. Hagen to see the right solution for your child.

4. Speaking of which, as a parent, what should I be telling Dr. Hagen when it comes to my child’s oral health, or overall state of health, when we come in for a visit?

That’s a great question. We are all about two-way, transparent communication at Hagen Dental. Be sure to tell us any concerns you have, and that includes any questions you or your children may have.

You will hear us ask about medications that your children may be taking. See this blog for why that’s so important when it comes to their dental care.

Besides letting us know any concerns or questions you have, also tell us any other health conditions we should know about. It’s not that we are nosey, rather, this is about your child’s entire health, and the mouth can really give us insight about your child’s current state of health—that is, when we are informed!

The kind of information you’d want to tell us includes any medical conditions (including history), any kind of pain or abnormal mouth/gum issues a child has had, and things such as allergies, asthma, diabetes, or other health-related conditions you would discuss with your other doctors.

It might not seem to be related to dental care, but more often than not, it is. Have any questions about your children’s teeth or gums? Schedule a visit with us today

What Teeth Whitener Can—and Cannot—Do

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

Just like with other technology, we’ve had the latest and greatest when it comes to teeth whitening in our office.

Even if we have good oral hygiene, teeth do get darker as we age. And yes, it is true that even if you have oral health habits that would make the dentist smile, that doesn’t mean you don’t eat or drinks beverages that can stain teeth over time as well!

Teeth stains are different than “normal” discoloration as we age, but both can contribute to a less-than-perfectly-white smile.

Our Pearly Whites…Or Not Quite So Pearly White!

Discoloration can be broke down into intrinsic and extrinsic color. Think of intrinsic as our teeth’s natural shade. People born with a hint of grey, or brown or yellow teeth would likely be more aware of this, as their teeth have this as their natural shade. This would refer to a color or shade of that is not due to their habits over time.

And as you can likely guess, when we drink coffee or wine, or have a certain medicine that alters our teeth, the extrinsic part of our teeth is what is being affected. What also affects our teeth’s shade includes other behaviors we can control such as smoking, which is one habit that can greatly reduce any efforts at keeping our teeth white.

teeth whiten cincinnati

When we purchase an OTC whitener from a drugstore, there are quite a variety of brands to choose from based on your desired goals, as well as your tooth sensitivity.

They also come with varying levels of success in terms of whitening efficacy because the bleach in them will vary, and the trays or ways in which they are applied will also effect their ability to work on any given person’s teeth. They do, however, provide more whitening benefit than your whitening toothpaste since they will have more bleach in them in comparison.

No matter if you use OTC whiteners, or Zoom! Whitening at our office, if you do not take good care of your teeth, it will be hard to keep your teeth white…and it can even be hard to get them whiter through the use of bleach in general.

Knowing this, the difference between the OTC brands and Zoom! is the level of intensity, effectiveness, and safety.

With Zoom!, we apply hydrogen-peroxide formula to your teeth. Then, we cover your surrounding gum so that you can avoid teeth sensitivity, or so-called “Zingers”.

If you use a kit at home, this process can be harder to setup so that you can whiten without any sensitivity. If you have a cavity or gum that is pulling back from the teeth, you could be exposing harsh bleach to those areas…you can see why that might hurt! Next, Zoom! Whitening uses a ultraviolet light that we directly shine onto your teeth. This way, within an hour you can fight the discoloration and be on your way. With many OTC options, that whitening process could take several weeks, or up to several months.

Since it happens much quicker, is the Zoom! Whitening option safe?

Zoom! Whitening at Hagen is in fact safe. It it were not in your best interest, we would let you know. On the other hand, if you want to use an OTC agent, ask us before proceeding so we can talk to you about your options, including the effectiveness and the safety of your kit from the store. Our real concern would be to avoid over-use, general misuse, or doing some damage to your teeth or gums. We don’t want to see you in excruciating pain.

“I’m not ready for any teeth whitening, but what can I do to prevent as much stains as possible?”

Pigmented molecules in food and beverages are actually watch latch onto our enamel. You probably know some of these offenders that are chromogen-rich in particular:

  • Black coffee
  • Dyed sweets
  • Red wine
  • Pop
  • Deeply-colored sauces (such as soy sauce)
  • Blueberries, cranberries, pomegranates or other dark berries

Certain gums and hard candies, in some situations, also fit into this category. If desired, you can avoid these foods and beverages. Also remember that smoking is very detrimental to any teeth whitening efforts.

Also on the list are foods with tannins, or with high acidity. These are things such as tea, pop or carbonated beverages with dye, sports drinks and acidic fruit. Some of these are not so brightly colored, but they still can work against our pearly whites.

Want to know more about our cosmetic dentistry procedures? Find out more here and let us know any questions you may have.

Why Does Good Oral Hygiene Matter? Looking Beyond Our Mouth

Monday, August 25th, 2014

More than 90 percent of systemic diseases have oral symptoms, according to the Academy of General Dentistry. Additionally, as much as 80 percent of adults in the US have gum disease.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the research as to why this might matter for the sake of our entire health.

A Look at the Science: Heart Health to Obesity 

We’ve talked about before how gum disease can lead to loss of bone and teeth, and how bacteria that cause gum disease have also been found in arterial plaques, which contributes to heart disease.

cincinnati dentist hagenWhat else does some of the latest research tell us?

Self-reported dental status has been shown to be connected with heart risk factors. One such study examining this connection was found in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The study looked are more than 15,000 people across nearly 40 countries to draw its conclusions.

Here is a glimpse of the study: 25 percent of the participants reported gum bleeding when they brushed their teeth. Around 41 percent had fewer than 15 teeth left. All the participants in the study had coronary heart disease in combination with at least another heart risk factor.

Ultimately, the research showed an association between the number of heart risk factors and gum disease across the sample.

While it has been debated whether periodontal disease is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (which takes 600,000 lives per year), this study was one where you can see evidence of how self-reported gum disease and such cardiovascular risk factors are associated.

More Clues About Our Health

Besides moderate or more advanced stages of periodontal disease showing us clues as to whether someone may develop heart disease, oral health also affects our state of health in other ways. It can negatively affect pregnancy and birth; one example being that gum disease is linked to premature birth and low birth weight in babies. Osteoporosis has been linked, in some studies, with periodontal bone loss. Additionally, tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s.

And although the cause-and-effect tie can be debated, there is also research connecting obesity and gum disease now. In particular, the research published in the Journal General Dentistry says how chronic inflammation is in part to blame.

Still other research shows a tie between poor dental habits and an increase in our risk of cancer.

There is also HPV; research in the Journal Cancer Prevention says that poor oral health means a 56 percent bump in oral HPV prevalence.  

Additionally, University of Texas Health Sciences Center researchers found dental problems are linked with a 28 percent higher prevalence of infection with HPV.

Another study was compiled by researchers from Brown University, the Forsyth Institute and Harvard University. These researchers said how they found that our body’s antibodies coming from certain oral bacteria is actually linked with doubled risk of pancreatic cancer. The researchers admitted that more needed to be studied to make any further claims, but it does show just one more example of how our oral health is tied to our entire health.  

This list of some of the latest research is not to make you worry. It may surprise you to learn that research has also produced evidence that shows how just getting your teeth professionally cleaned once can reduce risk for heart attach and stroke. (Think of a lifetime of regular professional teeth cleanings!)

The health of our mouths truly can really tell us about our quality of life.

At Hagen, we are the best choice for all your dental care. Whether you haven’t missed a cleaning in your lifetime, or whether it has been years since you have been to the dentist, we are looking forward to seeing you. Give us a call today.

Oral Cancer: Frequently Asked Questions

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

How does oral cancer start?

Oral, or mouth cancer, can refer to any kind of cancerous tissue growth in our oral cavities, can come from neighboring anatomy (such as the nose), or it can simply originate in the mouth. As you may or may not know, cancer can be best understood as a result of a mutation of our DNA.

When our cells operate in these abnormal ways, we can see them as red or white patches on our soft tissue, or as spots in our mouth that simply won’t heal. Most oral cancers are cancer of the epithelial cells. We see this classification of cancer in the tissue in our mouths and/or lips in most cases. 

Woral cancer cincinnati ohio what you need to knowhat are some of the common warning signs of oral cancer?

This is exactly why you come in to see us on a regular basis—we are checking for the early signs of oral cancer through screening each time we see you. If we were to see unusual lumps or ulceration that are not healing, we would want to know more. These skin lesions can be on the tongue, lip, or around the mouth. They can be white, red, or best describes as “pale” in color.

In other cases, signs or symptoms are mouth sores, or even pain in more advanced cases. And still in other situations, people have issues with tongue movement. Many of us have had some sort of unusual feeling, or possibly a sore in our mouth at one time or another, so the best course of action is to come in and see us if you are concerned.

The key is early detection, which in the case of oral cancer, greatly improves one’s survival rate.

What causes oral cancer?

Approximately two thirds of oral cancers are actually due to our behaviors. You may have already heard how in particular, heavy alcohol use and tobacco are two behaviors we know contribute to a rise in likelihood for oral cancer. Part of the reason why tobacco is so harmful for us is that tobacco has more than 60 known carcinogens.

Also keep in mind that chewing tobacco is putting this exposure directly onto our tissue. Chewing tobacco/snuff also (intentionally) is designed to irritate our mucous membranes (for quicker absorption), which is even worse for our oral health.

With that said, be aware that the majority of new cases of oral cancer are HPV-related.

That also means more young people are getting oral cancer today, a fact that surprises many.

Poor oral hygiene habits, as well as cases of chronic infection, have also been found to result in increasing one’s chance of oral cancer. Other risk factors include ultraviolet light (from sunlight or tanning beds) and infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). In some cases, these symptoms are

Seeing a dentist regularly, maintaining good oral hygiene habits over time, and avoiding tobacco are all very beneficial for us in terms of taking control of our lifestyle habits.