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10 Reasons to Smile This World Smile Day

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

world-smile-day-pic

We celebrate World Smile Day in October. World Smile Day is a day designed to help people smile more by performing random acts of kindness and goodwill. Here are 10 reminders of why we should be smiling:

  1. The classic yellow smiley face that we all know and love was created in 1963. It was designed to symbolize good will and good cheer on the planet (1). Although the original smiley doesn’t include teeth, at Hagen Dental we want to keep your teeth healthy so you can bare your pearly whites even if the smiley face doesn’t!
  2. Harvey Ball, the artist who was the creator of the smiley face, became concerned over the years about the over-commercialization of the smiley symbol. This led him to create World Smile Day, so that we would devote a day each year to smiles and kind acts throughout the world. The first World Smile Day was celebrated in 1999 (1).
  3. The smiley face knows no politics, no geography and no religion. Neither does tooth and gum disease. So no matter your race, creed or location, stay vigilant with your oral hygiene habits! Proper diet, daily flossing and brushing, are important to keep issues at bay.
  4. The slogan of the Smile Foundation is, “improving this world, one smile at a time” (2). We can relate to that message at Hagen Dental, since our focus is to help each of our patients keep their oral health up to par, helping them enjoy their mouth and smile. Stay current with your cleanings and checkups so that we can improve your smile and keep it healthy.

reasons-to-smile

  1. We can all use a reason to grin. Hagen Dental gives us a reason: We treat our patients with compassion and understanding, coupled with the latest technology, and the best in dental comfort. In other words, we care about our patients.
  2. Heidi Klum says: “I believe that when you put a smile out there, you get a smile back” (3). Keeping your teeth, gums, and mouth healthy gives you the courage and confidence to share your smile freely and frequently.
  3. The power of a smile has been documented endlessly over the years by authors, activists, singers, photographers, filmmakers, and beyond! (4). Imagine the entertainment business without the great dental technologies and oral hygiene practices that are common today.
  4. Smiles are contagious! Studies show that you can “infect” loved ones with your emotions and facial expressions (5,6). Focus on sharing positive feelings and emotions to keep the world around you in a happier state.
  5. Just as Richelle E. Goodrich says, “A smile is a light that sets your inner self aglow, letting others know you’re home,” (7) your smile and face are a window into your inner self. Put your best self forward by keeping your regularly scheduled dental appointments.
  6. The official message of the World Smile Day is: “Do an act of kindness. Help one person smile.” What can you do this month to help celebrate World Smile Day?

Keep that Smile Bright: Call Hagen Dental Practice Today

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://worldsmileday.com/index.php/article-index/item/363-welcome-to-the-world-smile-day-website
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Smile_Day
  3. http://www.ibtimes.com/world-smile-day-2016-quotes-16-happy-sayings-get-you-grinning-2427994
  4. http://www.latintimes.com/world-smile-day-quotes-top-15-famous-sayings-about-power-smiling-401222
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11408051
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12738341
  7. http://answersafrica.com/world-smile-day-2016.html

 

Oral Health: Does It Have An Updated Meaning Today?

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

oral health hagen dental in cincinnati

The World Dental Federation is a worldwide organization for the dental profession, representing over a million dentists across the globe! It’s called the FDI for short, because it was established in Paris as the “Fédération dentaire international” (1).

It’s now located in Geneva, Switzerland. Each year, approximately 300 delegates meet to discuss issues, debate changes, and define the future of dentistry across the world. These members are representatives from over 200 national dental associations and over 130 specialist groups from various countries. One of the missions of the FDI is to “promote optimal oral and general health for all peoples” (2, 3).

Earlier this month, the World Dental Federation launched an updated definition of the term “oral health.”

The term “oral” refers to all the components of your mouth and oral cavity: The teeth, gums, connective tissues, jaw bones, soft palate, mucosal tissue of the mouth and throat, tongue, lips, chewing muscles, salivary glands and the branches of the immune, nervous and vascular systems that supply, protect and nourish these tissues. That part hasn’t changed!

The FDI wanted to bring the definition up to contemporary standards by designating oral health as an integral part of an individual’s general health and well-being. The new definition was created by the Federation’s “Vision 2020 Think Tank”, which includes experts from oral health backgrounds, public health officials, and health economics experts (3).

So What Has Changed?

So what is the main differences between the old definition and the new definitions being used—and why does it matter?

Dr. Michael Click, co-chair of the FDI’s Vision 2020 Think Tank explains: “The old definition lacked a theoretical framework that made assessment and evaluation of oral health hard to measure,” he said. “Furthermore, this new definition moves dentistry from treating disease to treating a person with disease.” He went on to say they created a new definition so it could resonate with more people.

The intention is that more people will be able to understand concepts related to our oral health!

These changes might seem subtle, but they do have big significance. Oral health does not occur in isolation…in other words, the health of your teeth, gums, and entire mouth are a part of and acutely related to, your overall health. These new definitions help to clarify and validate that!

In summary, the main points, as defined by the World Dental Federation:

  1. Oral health is multifaceted. A “healthy smile” is more than being “cavity-free” and we agree with that, too! It includes the ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow and express emotion through facial movements. It means being able to do these things confidently and without pain, discomfort or disease.
  2. Oral health is a fundamental part of health, including both physical and mental wellbeing. Another area we agree with! Oral health and our overall health is influenced by the values attitudes of individuals and communities. This means that although oral health is always important—even if the quality of care varies depending on what country you live!
  3. Oral health is a reflection of the physiological, social, and psychological factors that are essential to the quality of life. That’s a mouthful, but also true! The point is: oral health is engrained in more facets of our lives than we may realize.
  4. Oral health is influenced by a person’s experiences, perceptions, expectations and ability to adapt to circumstances. Our overall health affects our oral health, just as our oral health has effect on our overall health (3).
    oral-health-quote

This broadened definition of oral health serves to update the definition to a complete state of physical, mental and social well-being, rather than just the absence of disease or health issue.

It embodies our understanding that everything in the body is intrinsically connected: oral health and general health go hand in hand, rather than being two separate concepts.

What does this mean for you? You cannot be truly healthy without good oral health! This puts enormous importance on good oral hygiene, positive lifestyle habits, and regular dental visits. At Hagen Dental Practice, we strive to help you achieve oral health, with the understanding that it helps you maintain and enhance your overall health.

We Can’t Wait to Meet You & Your Family

Don’t delay your visit. Early detection saves lives. Call us today to schedule an appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Sources/References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FDI_World_Dental_Federation
  2. http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/members_partners/member_list/fdi/en/
  3. http://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2016-archive/september/fdi-adopts-new-definition
  4. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/SurgeonGeneral/sgr/chap1.htm

 

Oral Cancer: This Is Why Early Detection Is Critical

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

oral health at hagen dental dds in cincinnati ohio

Almost 50,000 people are diagnosed with oral cancer each year (1). Sounds pretty surprising, doesn’t it? This includes cancers of the tongue, lips, gums, and other soft palate tissues of the mouth or upper throat.

Talking about cancer can be scary, but there is one key component to improved odds: Early detection. Detecting the issue before the cancer has spread to other parts of the body dramatically raises the rate of survival. One of the best ways to ensure early detection is to stay consistent with your dental care and dental cleanings.

Regular dental checkups involve more than just your teeth cleaning. Dr. Hagen’s exam includes a review of the health of your entire oral cavity – teeth, gums, tongue, and palate – for signs of disease, including oral cancer. Even though you may think you know your teeth pretty well, we’re actually able to screen you for cancer when you come in!

What Are We Looking For?oral health risk factors

Dr. Hagen is trained to perform a thorough head and neck examination at your dental visit. This exam detects changes in the tissues of the mouth and surrounding areas that could signal the beginnings of cancer. Dr. Hagen knows what signs to look for, what additional tests or labs to order, and when to refer to a specialist, when necessary.

Here are some of the cancer warning signs we screen for:

  • White or red lesions that are not healing
  • Unusual bleeding
  • Lumps or thickening of the soft tissue, such as the neck or cheek
  • Soreness of the throat, or pain in the mouth that does not go away
  • Chronic feeling that something is stuck in the throat
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing
  • Difficulty moving the jaw or tongue
  • Persistent ear pain
  • Hoarseness
  • Numbness of the tongue or mouth
  • Swelling of the jaw

Sure, that seems like quite a list, but know that just because you have a symptom on this list, doesn’t mean you definitely have cancer. Because there are so many ranging symptoms, that’s why you need someone qualified to look at your mouth and jaw for early detection.

Also, know that it indicates follow up and further analysis is typically needed, because if you do have cancer, early treatment can make a critical difference in fighting the disease.

symptoms of oral cancerAnd Why is Early Detection So Important?

Which leads us to our next point: if oral cancer is discovered early, the remission rate with treatment is nearly 90 percent (5). (Remission is what doctors use when speaking about cancer to mean that there are no symptoms and no signs of cancer. This is used rather than the word “cure.”)

Approximately 60 percent of those diagnosed with oral cancer will survive at least 5 years, but this number is an average: The 5-year survival rate for those with localized disease (cancer restricted to the mouth) is 83 percent. But if the cancer has metastasized (spread to other parts of the body), the 5-year survival rate is only 32 percent.

Said another way, early detection gives you the best opportunity to diagnose the cancer while it is still localized, and before it spreads to other areas of the body (2).  

Remembering to schedule your regular dental appointment is important. Rest easy knowing we are not only trained to help treat and prevent dental problems, but also to keep a lookout and help spot signs of more serious concerns.

Is it time for your next dental appointment? Don’t delay your visit. Early detection saves lives. Call us today to schedule an appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.healthline.com/health/oral-cancer/warning-signs-of-oral-cancer
  2. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/OralCancer/DetectingOralCancer.htm
  3. http://www.atooth.com/oral-cancer/
  4. http://www.dentistry.com/conditions/oral-cancer/mouth-cancer-symptoms-early-warning-signs
  5. https://www.humana.com/learning-center/health-and-wellbeing/healthy-living/oral-cancer

Minerals and Vitamins for a Healthy Smile

Saturday, August 20th, 2016

the health of your teeth hagen dental

Good oral hygiene practices are essential for a healthy smile. But have you ever wondered if your diet supports the best building blocks to keep those teeth strong? Mineral deficiencies can lead to weak bones and teeth. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin D are all important minerals and vitamins when it comes to preventing tooth decay and oral health issues. Check out these lists of foods that support you in your quest for strong, healthy teeth.

Calcium — Your teeth and jaw are formed and kept strong with the use of lots of calcium. Regular intake of this mineral helps keep your teeth enamel and jaw bones strong and healthy. Most of the body’s calcium is stored in the bones (teeth included!), while some circulates in the bloodstream for other uses. Consuming too little calcium can put you at risk of gum disease and tooth decay, and you will leech calcium from the bone to use for other body functions.

Sources of Calcium: Kale, tofu, chia seeds, sardines, canned salmon, green leafy vegetables such as collard greens, spinach and kale, dairy products, cauliflower, cabbage, almonds, bok choy, figs, and sesame seeds.1, 6

Phosphorus — Calcium and phosphorus work together to maximize the strength of bones and teeth. Without phosphorus, calcium can’t do it’s job properly. The combination of these two minerals is essential in children, whose bones and teeth are developing and forming their hard structure.

Sources of phosphorus: Pumpkin seeds, romano cheese, salmon, shellfish, almonds and other nuts, pork, beef, tofu, eggs, grapes, citrus fruit, cucumbers, tomatoes, beans and lentils.4, 8

your teeth health hagen dental cincinnatiMagnesium — Magnesium helps to build strong enamel for your teeth, as well as proper tooth formation. It also helps prevent the formation of cavities. Magnesium also works well alongside calcium for many functions.

Sources of Magnesium: Dark chocolate, green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and swiss chard, black beans, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, brown rice, cashews, salmon, raisins and avocado.2, 3, 7

Vitamin D — Vitamin D regulates the body’s balance of calcium and phosphorus and can promote their absorption. Vitamin D also helps to decrease inflammation of gums which is associated with periodontal disease.

Sources of Vitamin D: Natural sunlight (your body produces vitamin D with exposure to sun! This is your BEST source of D), shellfish, fish such as salmon, catfish and mackerel, eggs and butter.4, 5

These lists aren’t the only places to find these great bone builders, but they are a great place to start. See something new? Be adventurous this week and try a new recipe. Try to incorporate some of these foods in your regular diet alongside your other dental care routine. You’ll enjoy them knowing you are helping build and maintain a healthy smile.hagen dental cincinnati ohio

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at(513) 251-5500.

Sources/References used directly in this article:

1.http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/6-vitamins-and-minerals-your-mouth-needs/

2. http://www.123dentist.com/important-minerals-and-vitamins-for-your-oral-health

3.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/17/magnesium-benefits.aspx

4. https://www.dhsv.org.au/dental-advice/teeth-tips-and-facts/calcium-vitamin-d-and-phosphorus

5.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/11/12/vitamin-d1.aspx

6. http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/blog/whole-story/non-dairy-sources-calcium

7. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/

8. https://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/high-phosphorus-foods.php

Your Question Answered: How Often Do We Need X-Rays?

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

X-Rays: Why We Use Them As Diagnostic Tools

X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation. They were discovered way back in 1895.

We use them as diagnostic tools since they can penetrate our body tissues. Because different tissues in our body (gums versus our bones, for example) are penetrated at different degrees, we see “shadows” on the film produced by X-rays, as a result.

Our dental x-ray machines are quite sensitive, so you don’t need to worry about the amount of radiation needed to use them as a tool in this way! For comparison’s sake, you get more radiation from your every day background radiation.

As you know, we can see a lot when you come in to visit us by just examining your teeth, but X-rays show decay and infections beneath the surface. We’re better able to see any issues with bone loss, your jaw, and anything unusual happening with the soft tissues. If you have a cavity or tooth decay, for example, it shows up as darker on a radiograph.

So, How Often Are They Needed?

How often we need to get x-rays depends on your age, your ongoing oral health status, your risk level and of course if you have had any issues you report to us.

In general, we advise patients to have bitewing X-rays (see below for more!) every year, and Panorex X-rays every three years. A simple cavity between your teeth can turn into a root canal if not detected—so we simply work to prevent this from happening.

Keep in mind when you are a new patient at a dental practice, it may be recommended to get X-rays to know the status of your gums and teeth. Think of this as your new baseline!

If those X-rays were just done by another dentist, they can simply be forwarded to your new dentist.

Then What Are the Types of X-Rays I’m Receiving?

Bitewing: these show the upper and lower back teeth. They are usually done to check for any bone loss and decay between our teeth and to show how well our upper and lower teeth are lining up.

Periapical: with a person’s first visit to the dentist, these might be done. These show the entire tooth, and they can show if there are any infections/disease, specifically any issues below our gum line or in our jaw.

Occlusal: these who the roof and the floor of our mouth. Any cysts or abnormal growths would be evident through this kind of x-ray. 

Panoramic: when a wide-range view of the health of our mouth is needed—jaw, teeth, sinus, and nasal area—this is used. If there are fractions, infections, cysts, bone abnormalities or some kind of growth, it would be shown here.

Ready to get your dentist appointment setup at Hagen Dental? Get in touch with us today

Why Does the Dentist Ask You What Medications You Take?

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Why is when you go to the dental office we ask you to tell us if you are taking any medications?

It’s because many common medications (and that includes vitamins and supplements) can have an effect on your oral health, so we want to be as informed as possible as we take a look at your teeth and gums!

What are some possible side effects? Here is a starter list:

Dry Mouth 

Dry mouth is one of the more well known side effects of certain medications, especially since the effect is noticeable right away for many as they start to take a medicine. In addition, as many as 400 often-prescribed medications can result in dry mouth.

More than discomfort, dry mouth can quicken tooth decay since you are lacking the normal, natural cleansing effects of saliva in the mouth. For this reason, we like to at least know if we should keep a watch—or prescribe a special oral regimen—so that we can be as preventative as possible to lower your risk of severe tooth decay.

Abnormal Bleeding

You may have heard that aspirins can help certain people have reduced blood clotting—which is why you hear they may help prevent strokes and/or heart disease. 

We like to know if you’re taking any of these anticoagulants because it can affect how you bleed during oral surgery, or for certain treatments for gum disease. In other words, we’d like to know of any situations we should be aware of in these cases!

Taste-Altering

Has your dentist ever asked you if you’ve experienced anything abnormal since the last time you came in for your dental examination? If you’ve been experiencing what can best be described as a bitter taste in your mouth, that can mean something unusual is going on. At the same time, some medications will cause this bitter or metallic taste—or even the ability to taste in general! If we know what you’ve been prescribed, we’re better able to tell you what’s the real cause of these changes in your taste. 

Gum Reactions 

Believe it or not, certain medications have been shown to lead to the development of sores, discoloration, or even inflammation in your mouth’s soft tissues.  Other medications, such as certain anti-seizure medications or immunosuppresants, can actually enlarge your gums. If any of these are a problem, we can help set you up on a regimen that can help you manage these problems.

So next time we ask you about any medications or supplements you regularly take, you’ll know why–we like to see a holistic view of your health at Hagen Dental! At our office, our goal is to help find the right oral health regimen based on all of your health! 

Are you having any other unusual tastes? Or do you feel it’s time to visit the dentist again regularly? We’d love to have you as a patient. Visit our website here and be sure to pass this blog along to friends!

 

For the Holidays: 10 Fun Facts About Teeth

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

1. Your teeth’s enamel is (almost!) diamond-hard. With that said, you can still fracture it when you chew ice, or use your teeth to crack open nuts.

2. We have four different types of teeth, and they have four different functions in our mouths: biting, tearing, crushing and grinding.

3. How many teeth do you think the average person has? About thirty two: four wisdom, eight incisors, four canines, twelve molars and eight pre-molars.

4. Way before toothpaste, humans used a combination of charcoal and ground up chalk, ashes, lemon juice, and honey-tobacco mixture to “clean” their teeth.

5. The only living being that does not have jaws and teeth is the anteater, which uses its tongue to eat.

6. We may take care of our teeth so that we don’t lose them, but crocodiles don’t have to worry so much—they keep growing new teeth in to replace their old teeth.

7. It’s been said that more than 70 percent of people would rather go grocery shopping than floss…

8. Staying hydrated (with water) can do some good for your breath. Reason being: when you have a dry mouth, you are more prone to developing bad breath (think of morning breath!). Drinking water throughout the day can help combat all that bacteria.

9. Do you prefer a soft or hard toothbrush? Either way, the average toothbrush contains about 25,000 bristles.

10. The idea of flossing isn’t exactly new…anthropologists have found evidence showing that ancient humans used things like pointed sticks to clean between their teeth. Consider flossing after some of those holiday meals this year!

Have a great holiday season, from Hagen Dental!

Ever have a friend who asked you how you got your smile so bright? Be sure to let them know about Hagen. Or, are you looking for a dentist? Visit our website for more information about how to get in touch. If you already “like” us on Facebook, be sure to also look at our current contest… all you have to do is, well, SMILE! Find out contest details here.

What’s In a Smile?

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Ever wonder what it is that people notice when they look at you?

Photo courtesy of Diva Village

Well, believe it or not, here is breakdown we recently heard on the radio:

5. Nose

4. Hair

3. Weight

2. Eyes

1. Your smile!

With your smile being the number one thing people notice, just image the impact having a healthy smile, and how that can positively affect the way people perceive you!

Not only this, we’ve even recently read how the Academy of General Dentistry has reported that 40 percent of people notice a smile first when it comes to their co-workers! Here are a few questions you can ask yourself when it comes to the health of your smile: Are you happy with the color of your teeth? Are you happy with how your teeth are shaped? Do you normally feel you have fresh breath?

If you don’t feel positive about your answers to these questions, it could be affecting not only how others see you, but how much confidence you have in yourself…Here are a few more questions to ask yourself about your current habits:

  • Do you brush your teeth twice a day, being mindful about not brushing too hard in the process?
  • Do you see your dentist regularly and setup your next appointment while you are there so you are more likely to come in?

No matter how you feel about your teeth and your habits currently, come visit Hagen Dental! It will be your first step towards having that enviable, radiant smile–and a healthy mouth–that you deserve to have.

5 Things You Need to Know About CEREC

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

5. CEREC stands for the ceramic reconstruction of your teeth! Simply put, it is a restoration product that uses—you guessed it—ceramic materials to restore any tooth that is decayed or broken…Just think: metal-free and one-visit!

Said another way, it no longer takes 2-4 weeks to send your restorations to a lab, to wait to get your crown/veneer/onlay/inlay prepared, and then another visit back to the dentist! Now all you do is come in, and that same very day you can walk away with your teeth restored.

4. CEREC will match the color of your teeth. And what else does that mean? Full confidence in your smile! That’s right, they look great, they last longer, and they are even biocompatible. On top of that, not only does ceramic have similar characteristics to healthy dental enamel, but we will also be sure to conserve as much of the original dental material as possible when you come into Hagen for your restoration.

3. There are five steps when you come in for your CEREC restoration. See Dr. Hagen explain it all here!

Dr. Hagen explains everything you need to know about CEREC.

2. There are many circumstances that make you a candidate for CEREC restoration. Cracked tooth? Chipped or heavily damaged tooth? Do you know that it is time to replace your old metal restorations? These may mean you are a candidate. If you have been told you need a new crown, inlay, only or even a bridge, you could be a potential candidate as well. Ask Dr. Hagen next time you come in for a visit if you want more information.

1. Hagen Dental is one of the few places here in the Tri-state area where you can get CEREC dental restoration…just think, all in one visit you can get your custom porcelain crowns that will perfectly fit your mouth.   

Want to know more about the Hagen Dental team and our state-of-the-art technology? Visit here or find us on Facebook hereConcerned about payment options? Visit this link.

The Truth About Aging and Your Teeth

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

As people age, it’s common to worry about several health factors…But one the most important aspects relating to our overall quality of life is often forgotten: oral care!

The time to start healthy oral care habits to maintain throughout your lifetime is now!


Why care? For starters, you don’t want to lose your teeth – and gum disease and tooth decay become the leading causes of tooth loss as we age. And even if you don’t lose your teeth, you don’t want to have to deal with receding gums that can become a problem in your 40s or 50s.

What’s more, it is important to be aware that dental crowns and filling do need to be replaced as we age. Over time, filling materials can wear and chip at the edges of your fillings and they can become weaker. When you go to your dentist regularly, they can check the health of your dental restorations so you can replace it when you need to.

So what else should we know in relation to oral care as time goes by? When you are over the age of about 50, there can be change in your gums, which can promote tooth decay. What’s more is that older adults who take medication (antihistamines, diuretics, pain killers, high blood pressure medications and/or antidepressants) can potentially see some negative side effects including dry mouth (which can lead to more decay!), gum changes, and even taste changes. These are all good reasons to visit your dentist on a regular basis.

Keep this in mind: dental disease is actually almost entirely preventable – and isn’t inevitable with age! Plus, a white and healthy smile is a huge indicator of good health and youth! Take your health in your hands now so down the road you can still enjoy a high quality of life.

Check out our services tab on our website for more detailed information. If you’d like to setup an appointment with Hagen Dental, visit the About Us page on our website or stop in our office. Or, “follow” us on Twitter and “like” us on Facebook.