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9 Dental Myths That People Still Believe

Monday, July 25th, 2016

9 Dental Myths That People Still BelieveYou hear a variety of things all the time about your oral health – from friends, your family, the media, from advertisements, and more…so how do you know what to believe and what to ignore? Finally, here are answers to your questions! In this post, we separate fact from fiction and drill down on those dental myths.

Myth #1: Brushing and flossing extra well before your dental appointment will hide the fact that you haven’t been keeping up with your regular brushing and flossing habits.

Ramping up your brushing and flossing a few days before you visit the dentist doesn’t mean you can “undo” the months where your oral hygiene habits were lacking! In fact, adding in extra oral hygiene after letting it go for a while has the potential to actually inflame your gums, making them swollen, red and more likely to bleed.

Your dentist will know your secret! There’s nothing that can substitute for regular care in between your dental visits. (1).

Myth #2: If your gums bleed, you should stop brushing and flossing.

It turns out, the opposite is true: you don’t want to stop brushing or flossing if you notice your gum is bleeding or irritated! Plaque build-up and food debris on the teeth are the culprits behind gum bleeding. Regular brushing and flossing is the best way to remove plaque build-up and food from the mouth. If the plaque build-up is too severe, getting a dental cleaning is the best choice to get the problem under control (1, 2). If your gum is bleeding abnormally or doesn’t stop, you want to let us know, too.

myth bustingMyth #3: Brushing MORE will always improve the health of your teeth.

More is not better in this case—especially if you tend to brush too hard. Over-brushing your teeth can wear the enamel down due to the abrasive properties of your toothpaste. Rinsing your mouth out after eating is a safe alternative to extra brushing sessions. Using a soft bristled brush also helps avoid problems from those prone to brushing too hard (1, 2).

Myth #4: Babies don’t need to go to the dentist.

We now recommend bringing in your toddler at around 18 months. This is typically about the time when some, but not all, of their baby teeth are in. The checkup will also allow you to ask questions and get any advice on how you can continue to promote a healthy dental routine for your baby—for life!

Myth #5: Dental treatment and visits to the dentist should be avoided during pregnancy.

Very false! During pregnancy, blood flow, hormones, and often a woman’s diet will change. This can cause an increase in bacteria in your mouth, which leads to an increased likelihood for dental issues such as gingivitis, bleeding gums, or development of cavities over the course of the pregnancy.

Be sure to keep that dental check-up during pregnancy! X-rays will likely be avoided, unless absolutely necessary, but many dental procedures, including cleanings are completely safe for pregnant women and can help prevent inflammation. It’s also very important to maintain good oral health to avoid adverse effects on your developing baby (1, 5).

Myth #6: If there is no visible issue in your mouth, you don’t need to see your dentist.

Just because you can’t see a problem, doesn’t mean you should skip your regular dental checkup. Your dental cleanings and exams each year help ensure your teeth STAY healthy! It’s also important to find any dental problems early so they don’t become serious (2). Don’t forget that your dentist visit also includes oral cancer screenings, too.

Myth #7: Teeth whitening will damage your enamel.

New technology has made teeth whitening much safer! (Zoom! Whitening, anyone?) You can stick with professional whitening for the safest options, and ask us any questions you have about the process (2)!

Myth #8: Losing baby teeth to tooth decay is okay – that’s what adult teeth are for, right?

False! Losing a baby tooth to tooth decay is not insignificant. This can result in damage to the developing crowns of the permanent teeth just below the baby tooth. It could also mean the child is not developing proper dietary and dental health habits to promote healthy teeth down the line (3).

Myth #9: You’ll know when you have a cavity.

Sometimes you’ll know when you have a cavity or an issue of some kind…but many times you won’t! And by the time you can feel the discomfort of a cavity, it has probably spread to a larger area than it would have if it had been caught at a regular dental cleaning and examination (4).

Have More Questions About Your Dental Health? We Can’t Wait to Meet You & Your Family

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

Sources

  1. http://www.stlawrencedentistry.com/top-10-dental-myths/
  2. http://www.1800dentist.com/dental-myths-separating-fact-from-fiction-finally/
  3. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100805103926.htm
  4. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/cavities-myths
  5. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-care-pregnancy

 

Foods (And Drinks) That Damage Your Enamel

Friday, July 15th, 2016

Did you know? Your tooth enamel health is directly related to what you are eating, including those beverages you are drinking!

Keeping your teeth healthy involves more than just brushing and flossing.

foods and drinks that can damage your enamel hagen dental

Your enamel is the hard outer layer of your teeth. In fact, it’s the hardest substance in the human body—and for good reason! This surface layer helps protect the sensitive inner parts of the tooth from decay and damage. However, even enamel is subject to harm if not treated well. It is normal for some wear and tear to occur, but by focusing on what you are feeding your body (and thus putting into your mouth) you can keep that outer barrier of your teeth stronger (5).

Maintain the Health of Your Enamel

Here are some foods to avoid or minimize for optimum enamel health:

Sugary Foods: Increased sugars feed bacteria in your mouth. Left unchecked, these bacteria produce acidic byproducts, which can soften and slowly wear away at your enamel. Candy, especially sour candies, which are sugar-filled and acidic, are the least friendly combo for your teeth! But sugar doesn’t just hide in candy…Check your food labels on condiments, cereals, and other desserts and snacks for high amounts of added sugar (1, 2).

Sugary Beverages: Just like sugary foods, beverages can be a sneaky source of sugar and acid, ready to harm your enamel! Soda is especially bad, because not only is it sugary, it has additional acidic components. Coffee is high in acidity, and people often load it with syrups or sugars, too! Just imagine what happens if a highly acidic, sugary drink sits on your enamel for hours on end. Try cutting back on that cup of joe, or leaving out the sweetener. Frequent use of sports drinks in recent years, especially in children, has also been shown to harm enamel since the sugar sits on their teeth during activity, in many cases. Even fruit juices should be taken in moderation, because they are high in simple sugars and acid as well (1, 2, 6).enamel facts hagen dental

Foods that give you heartburn: Severe heartburn means stomach acid is moving up the esophagus. Those stomach acids that escape the stomach can reach your mouth and erode the enamel as well. So if you have certain foods that trigger heartburn, avoid them (1).

Ice: Simply put, ice is for chilling, not chewing! But isn’t water good for you? Yes! And ice is fine in your beverages – but avoid chewing on it! Chewing on hard substances such as ice can damage the enamel. The same is true for very hard candies that you crunch on (3, 6).

Citrus Fruit: Fruits are an excellent choice for incorporating more vitamins into your diet, especially the citrus variety. But heed this warning: frequent exposure to acidic foods, such as citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, limes and lemons, can erode your enamel over time. Your best bet? Eat these foods as part of a meal, rather than by themselves (3, 6).

Sticky Foods: Sticky foods, such as sticky candies, taffy, caramels, or even dried fruit such as raisins, can leave residue in your teeth, which means the sugar will sit on the enamel, leaving a food source for bacteria, which will in turn release enamel-damaging acid (2, 3, 6). Limit your intake of these foods to avoid potential damage to your enamel over time.

Starchy Foods: Starch-filled foods, such as potato chips, cookies, cakes, muffins and other starchy, processed snacks, tend to get trapped in your teeth. These starchy carbohydrates stay in your mouth and breakdown into sugar and acid more slowly, thus creating a longer period of sugar and acid threat to the teeth. Bacteria in your mouth love to feed on the left-behind sugars from these foods (3, 4, 6).

Protect Your Enamel

Analyze your diet over the next few weeks to discover which of these simple, daily changes you could make to ensure better health and protection for your enamel! Call Hagen Dental at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here to learn more.


Sources/References

  1. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-mouth-15/beautiful-smile/tooth-enamel-damage
  2. http://www.divinecaroline.com/self/wellness/mind-your-mouth-seven-foods-damage-tooth-enamel
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips/9-Foods-That-Damage-Your-Teeth/
  4. http://www.healingteethnaturally.com/foodstuffs-that-can-attack-teeth.html
  5. https://www.humana.com/learning-center/health-and-wellbeing/healthy-living/tooth-enamel
  6. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips

 

Did You Know? 4 Facts About Hagen Dental Practice That Will Surprise You

Saturday, April 23rd, 2016

facts about hagen dental in cincinnati

You may think you know a lot about Hagen, but did you know these 4 things?

1. Hagen was the second dentist in Cincinnati to use the CEREC machine and terminology!

CEREC uses ceramic materials to restore any tooth that is decayed or broken, a procedure that can be done in just one-visit. What’s great is that it also preserves your tooth structure, and it lasts for a long, long, long time – if not forever.

But did you know that Dr. Hagen was one of the first to do this – in the region?

Assuming you are a candidate for a CEREC restoration, we examine a number of factors including the tooth itself, and the tissue around it. We then get an optical impression of the tooth. A reflective powder is applied to the tooth, and a picture is taken and viewed on our computer screen. That’s all done so we can make the perfect restoration!

Then we use our CEREC machine to create the restoration. After we have our 3-dimensional, virtual model of the tooth, Dr. Hagen designs the custom-fit restoration you’ll eventually have inside your mouth. That means that – as you might have guessed by now – we’ve been doing a form of 3D printing, right in our office, for years!

Next Dr. Hagen will bond the crown to the remaining tooth structure. This ceramic, tooth-colored restoration is not only cut out and shaped perfectly but we make sure you have a proper fit and a comfortable bite when it’s in your mouth. Not only has Dr. Hagen been doing one-visit CEREC crowns for years, but he was one of the first to even call it by that name.

CEREC technology _dentist offerings

2. Hagen Dental Practice has 202 combined years of experience across our staff.

If you’ve been to Hagen Dental Practice, you know we do everything we can to make sure you are as comfortable as possible. We keep you smiling – not just with our excellent treatment, but with the unusually friendly and caring manner with which care is provided.

But did you know that our team has 202+ combined years of experience? We want our team members to be both technically competent and personally warm, and we feel fortunate to have found such people! See the team on our website here.

serving patients for more than 200 years3. Hagen Dental Practice offers Snap-On Smile™.

Snap-On Smile™ brings you an affordable, pain-free, non-invasive cosmetic way to get a beautiful smile.

Looking to close a gap you have in your teeth? Or maybe you are looking to cover your existing crooked teeth? Another way that Hagen Dental Practice is leading the way is with the ability to get a smile makeover in our office. With Snap-On Smile™, there is no drilling or extractions necessary. Let’s explore further.

Once we know if you are a candidate, we talk aesthetics. Then, a pain-free impression of your teeth is made, and on your next visit with Hagen, you will have your new smile fitting!

The fitting is just what it sounds like: we make sure that your new smile fits just as it should, and you get to walk out with your beautiful smile! Your smile makeover can be just that easy and quick, and your fitting can last as long as 5 years. That’s right: Snap-On Smile™ requires no shots and no drilling! Ask us for more information if you’d like to learn more about this life-changing solution.

4. Hagen Dental Practice’s patients’ ages range from 3 to 100.

When you come in to Hagen Dental Practice, a hygienist professionally cleans your teeth, helping to keep your teeth free of cavities and your gums free of bacteria. In turn, this lessen the risk of serious health conditions.

On your own, regular brushing helps combat plaque and tartar build-up, but that’s also what we look to remove when you come in to see us. Regular cleanings keep serious problems from developing and they help you keep your natural teeth for a lifetime. Just ask any of our patients – which certainly range from brand new teeth to teeth that have lasted for decades!

Speaking of teeth that last for a lifetime, did you know that Hagen Dental Practice’s patients range from 3 to 100 years old?
We are proud to be able to offer services to children at their first visit and to 100 and beyond!

Your Family Will Love Our Friendly & Relaxed Office

No matter your age, we’d love to come see you! After all, you and your entire family deserve a healthy smile that can last a lifetime. If you are thinking about bringing the younger kids in, know that we can relieve fears in children of all ages and put them at ease for every visit. Whether it is for a cosmetic consultation or for your regular visit, we’d love to see you. Read more about Dr. Hagen and the team, including our state-of-the-art dental methods and technologies, and then give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your children.

 

Why Does My Dentist Need to Know If I Have Diabetes?

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

diabetes and your smile and oral health

When you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop problems in your mouth, and you also less equipped to heal after dental surgery.

And, according to the American Diabetes Association, the most common problem affecting gums and teeth for people with diabetes is gum disease.

Think of your dentist as someone who is an advocate for your total health and well-being.

If we don’t know you are living with diabetes, we aren’t knowledgeable about the state of your health, and we may not be able to be as proactive in contributing to your treatment strategy.

Because diabetes makes you prone to other mouth problems – not “just” gum disease – if we know your health status, we are able to ensure that you are taking all the steps to best manage your blood sugar. Additionally, there are medications that can result in drastic and impactful changes in the mouth.

For instance, certain medications can drastically reduce the amount of saliva you have in your mouth, which can greatly impact your ability to “naturally” cleanse your teeth. As a result, we can see a drastic, and immediate change in the amount of harmful bacteria (and plaque) in your mouth – if you were to do nothing to manage this change in the mouth. All of this can happen relatively quickly, but with greater communication around your medications, we can come up with a strategy and plan to encourage a healthy mouth.

All in all, when we know the medications you’re taking, we’re better equipped to give you recommendations that take your entire health into account.

medication and diabetes

Mouth Problems: What to Know

In an ideal situation, we have a plan, and we manage our blood sugar levels, stay on a healthy nutrition plan, and continue daily, good oral health habits. If we also see a dentist regularly we can prevent problems, but if a problem occurs, we can catch it early!

When we have poor blood sugar control, we see an increase in the risk for gum problems. Just like with other infections, gum disease can cause our blood sugar to rise. And then, as a result, diabetes can be harder to manage because you are less able to fight bacteria and even more susceptible to infections.

If Our Blood Sugar is Uncontrolled…

If our blood sugar becomes uncontrolled, we may experience dry mouth and bad breath. What’s worse is that we can end up with thrush, inflammation in our gums and infections in the mouth.

Warning signs that you have an oral infection include:

  • Swelling or pus around the teeth or gums – even if small
  • Pain in your mouth that doesn’t go away
  • Pain when chewing
  • Dark spots in your teeth
  • The appearance of holes in your teeth
  • White or red patches on your gum tissue or anywhere in the mouth

Call us if you have diabetes and any of the signs or symptoms listed above.

Keep Taking Care of Your Teeth

The Canadian Diabetes Association says that, “Because periodontal disease is an infection, bacteria produce toxins that affect the carbohydrate metabolism in individual cells. It is also thought that the host response to periodontal bacteria can increase insulin resistance and, therefore, blood glucose levels.” Said another way, there is evidence to suggest (although cause and effect is not quite determined) that there is a two-way link between the state of your mouth and your management of diabetes (1).

If anything, this assertion just reinforces the idea that we have to be proactive in taking care of our mouths. Step one? Telling your dentist this major lifestyle change – that way we can work together to reduce your risk of complications and prevent gum and mouth infections or gum disease.

keep your teeth healthy

We Support Your Entire Health: Give Hagen Dental a Call Today

We want you to help you manage your diabetes – in a way that is as comfortable as possible. We’re here to partner with you so you can improve your total health.

Have questions? We’d love to answer them. Hagen Dental is supportive no matter where you are on your health journey. Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/5-reasons-why-oral-care-matters/
  2. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/more-on-the-mouth.html
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/diabetes

Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy: Part Two

Saturday, February 13th, 2016

choosing your childs dentist

Last week we talked about how February is National Children’s Dental Health Month. It’s important to take time with our kids to show them the importance of dental health.

After all, the mouth is the gateway to the body—meaning that the mouth greatly affects our total health, and that when we have a healthy mouth we often have a healthy body.

During Childhood: What We Can Do

Last week we talked about just how important it is to start taking your child to Dr. Hagen at around age 3. Besides taking our children to our dentist around that age (unless we were to tell you otherwise), there are other norms of tooth development during childhood.

First, kids will experience teeth that wiggle. Typically around age 6, kids will find that their teeth will begin to come loose. Generally speaking a good idea is to let the tooth come out naturally or with a bit of wiggling to help it come out with very little pain.
Cavities are also something to consider during this time. Again, in many cases due to high sugar in the diet, cavities can develop in our children’s teeth. There are steps we can take to make sure that kids reduce the likelihood of cavities, but also are educated on good oral health.

These steps include:

  1. Brushing for two minutes a day—at least. Take your time during this process and be sure that kids are brushing gently. In an ideal scenario, we might spend time brushing after every meal. Aim for two times per day, at minimum. Be sure to involve your children in the process and get creative to make it fun! Kids will enjoy it more if you are having fun, too. Verbalize how good of a job they are doing, why they are brushing their teeth, and even consider brushing your teeth as a family if that helps promote good oral health habits for all.
  1. Take a look at nutrition. Educate kids on how eating healthy can be delicious and can make them feel great! Emphasize the importance of instilling good dental hygiene habits at an early age. Since kids are often on the go, encourage healthy snacking from a young age if possible. This may mean planning ahead in order to avoid the more convenient, lower nutrient-dense (and sugar-heavy) snacks. Aim to avoid sugar-added drinks entirely if it’s possible, or keep them at a minimum since you know the damage they can do to teeth and overall health.dr hagen childrens dentist

When should kids start brushing their teeth by themselves?

It’s a good question, and every child is different—just like they are when it comes to tying their shoes. If we teach by example, many children can quickly pick up the habit and enjoy doing this on their own. Others are slower and less likely to pick up the habit on their own. Try to promote brushing their teeth as something fun and positive in your household to combat this notion.

On average, many kids have the ability to start brushing their teeth by themselves at age 4 or 5. It is at this age where they have the dexterity to be able to do so. If you notice your child is not taking enough time as they brush their teeth, consider some kind of timer to help them reach a goal.

When your child is around 7 or 8, they no longer need the baby toothbrush. At this point, they should be able to fully brush their teeth by themselves. A talking point used with many children is to discuss how although baby teeth fall out, they are important because they help “set up” our adult teeth. In other words, they set the stage for our adult teeth to come in.

“These Teeth Are For Life”

Communicate with your children that unlike the other bones in their body, our teeth do not “self-repair” in the same way. Although our gums do have the ability to “self-repair,” it is important for children to see why they need to take care of their teeth—even if they don’t have all their adult teeth in yet. Once they do have their adult teeth in, they should be aware that these are for life!

Another “norm” in our culture that can’t be forgotten is the Tooth Fairy! Technically, by the time our children have a full set of adult teeth, they will have lost 20 baby teeth…that’s a lot of teeth for the Tooth Fairy

Acting as the tooth fairy, many times parents give children around $1 for each tooth—or at least, when kids remember to leave it for the fairy! If your family is interested in the tradition, you can use the Tooth Fairy as a way to encourage good dental habits. Again, it’s just one more way you can promote education as well as good brushing habits.

Have questions about your child’s specific dental health? Or are you ready to bring your child in for their first visit to the dentist? Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here.

Sources

“Look Mom, No Cavities”: Here’s 10 Vintage Dental Ads You Don’t Want to Miss

Thursday, October 29th, 2015
5 times active

The promise of clean, fresh breath all day.

Tooth kit

Just look what 39 cents could get you in 1953!

acid fur

This one refers to “acid fur”!

baby ad

Can you believe this one?

do as your dentist

So direct!

duty

According to this ad, keeping you oral health up to par is what they call “keeping fit” and “America’s duty”!

Look mom no cavities advert

“No cavities!”

pass up the girl

Oh no! We don’t think we’d see this ad today! Here is one aimed at the ladies.

enamel

This Colgate ad talks about how nature can’t replace your enamel.

whiskey tooth paste

This ad is for genuine whiskey toothpaste!

These may be vintage ads, but we offer the latest, state-of-the-art technology and services at Hagen Dental. Learn more about our practice here and give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule an appointment.

Sources These Were Taken From:

  • http://www.smilegeneration.com/cerec

Say “Ahh” with Fresher Breath, Less Plaque Buildup & More

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

top cincinnati dentist

We know our tongues help us speak and chew food, but our tongues also help maintain the health of our mouth!

It’s time we talk about the tongue, and how it’s crucial for our entire health and well-being.

Have you ever had bad breath?

Chances are, at some point or another you have! It might have just been in the morning, or after a cup of coffee…Whatever the cause, one of the most common sources of bad breath can be the tongue.

That’s because, believe it or not, most of the bacteria in the mouth actually live on our tongue.

Inside the Mouth

Bacteria like to live on our tongue. Because of this, bacteria can be difficult to remove even with brushing and flossing. As a result, some people like to use a tongue scraper.

Using a tongue scraper helps proactively remove food, debris, fungi, toxins, dead cells…and well, yes, bacteria, from the surface of our tongue.

There are several benefits to using a tongue scraper or to taking extra, dedicated time to brushing your tongue thoroughly each day. Beyond just fighting bad breath that can be embarrassing, there are two other benefits to know about when it comes to keeping our tongue clean!

1. Resets our food palate, helping us stay nourished.

When we scrape or focus efforts on cleaning our tongue, we are able to activate saliva production. As you may know if you’re a regular Hagen blog reader, saliva helps naturally clean the teeth. Saliva is also a crucial component in kick-starting our digestion.

At the very start of digestion is when we get to taste and savor our food. When we have a clean tongue, we are better able to taste flavors. Just think: you are potentially removing a coated tongue, and removing “clogged” taste buds in the process.

Better tasting food should be enough reason alone to brush your tongue!

2. Keeps your immune system strong.

Has your tongue ever looked like a color you were not used to seeing, or almost as if it were fully “coated”? That could be due to dead cells and foot particles, which is what cleaning our tongue helps remove…

The tongue is the gatekeeper to our health, in many ways, that means it helps keep out many bad toxins that can affect our immunity. We also begin to break down nutrients in the mouth thanks to the tongue, as mentioned, which is another major factor influencing our total health, and the body’s ability to fight off germs.

cincinnati dentist hagen dental dds


Does your tongue look irregular? If you have any of these signs, here’s what it could mean. Ask us for more information.

 

Ready to learn more?

If you are interested in learning more about your tongue or a tongue scraper, ask us for more information. We can see if you are a better candidate for a tongue brush (effective at loosening particles on the surface of the tongue) or a tongue scraper (effective at gathering bacteria and particles and removing them from the mouth). Some people, at first, find they need to use the tongue scraper daily. Others, over time, begin to use it less often. Ask us for more guidance.

You know that clean feeling when you leave the dentist?

Toxins and build-up have been removed, which is part of why your mouth feels so great. If you are ready to start going to the dentist regularly again, or if you need a new dentist, give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit us at http://hagendds.com/

The Real Story Behind the Tooth Fairy

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

The Tooth Fairy

They say the three most famous figures in mythology are Santa, the Easter Bunny and…the tooth fairy!

For many of us, all three might have meant gifts at one time or another in our life.

Many are familiar with the stories behind Santa and the Easter Bunny, but what about the tooth fairy?

How and Why Did the Tooth Fairy Folklore Begin?

When we’re young and we lose teeth, we quickly learn that we can place the baby tooth underneath our pillow. Then—as the folklore goes—as we sleep, the tooth fairy will come and replace that lost tooth with a small amount of money.

Across Europe and around the world, the concept of exchanging baby teeth for a “fee” in return was seen as early as the 13th century. And not all the rituals with baby teeth had to do with money: baby tooth-related rituals have ranged from throwing teeth into the sun, throwing teeth into fire and even hiding or burying the baby teeth once they fell out.

It has also been documented that in both Russia and Mexico, among other places, people have sacrificed a mouse when a child loses a tooth! The idea behind the ritual was said to be that by sacrificing a mouse, the child’s adult teeth would grow in as strong and sturdy as the rodent’s teeth. Anthropologists call the underlying idea “sympathetic magic.”

We don’t know about you, but we’ll stick with putting a tooth underneath a pillow for a little financial incentive!

The Newcomer on the Mythological Scene

Although it is true that Europeans had some form of ritual around baby teeth, accounts vary on how that gifting process first translated into a tooth fairy leaving the gift behind.

Most likely the source? A story from France!

There was a tradition from 18th century France of a “tooth mouse,” potentially loosely based off a story La Bonne Petite Souris. In this story, a fairy changes into a mouse, and hides under a pillow in order to taunt the King. She then punishes him by knocking out all his teeth. This could have been a start to the earliest of ideas of the tooth fairy as the “good fairy.”

The tooth fairy (or “good fairy”) is said to have first been publicly referenced dating back to 1908, when the Chicago Daily Tribune gave reference to it. Other historians prefer the origin being closer to 1927, and still others say it was later in the 50, 60s or 70s when the tradition really began or gained popularity.

Just as the tooth fairy was gaining popularity, pop culture helped reinforce the concept. At the time, Disney was releasing films including Cinderella and Pinocchio; these undoubtedly helped solidify the idea of the tooth fairy in children’s minds and imaginations.

Some point to the fact that people were looking to encourage the idea in children of taking good care of their teeth—and that their teeth were in fact valued, around this time period. The tradition and idea of a tooth fairy made tooth disposal more lighthearted, and as a result, was embraced by families. It’s also said that parents saw it as a way to also help children get over any fear of losing a tooth. What is known is that by 1970s, when the tooth fairy was mentioned on the radio, the American Dental Association was inundated with inquiries about the fairy! Families and children loved the story.

A Very Good—and Popular—Fairy

The tooth fairy may be young, but she is getting more generous with time: the amount of money left behind by a tooth fairy does tend to increase with the rate of inflation.

Just how much does the tooth fairy leave, on average?

Researchers at Visa examined just how generous she is, finding that she leaves about $3.70 per tooth, a number that was steadily increasing over time.

The tooth fairy isn’t just embraced by young children. According to a Well’s Survey, 97 percent of parents feel neutral or positive about the tooth fairy. She may not be as celebrated as Santa and the Easter Bunny, but we like to hear the entire family embraces her!

Looking for a dentist that can take care of your entire family? Give Hagen Dental a call today at 513-251-5550.

References

How to Avoid 3 Strikes Against Your Teeth

Sunday, July 12th, 2015

One thing you shouldn’t see at this year’s All Star game held at Great American Ball Park?

Chewing tobacco!

That’s in part because in 2011, Major League Baseball stopped providing their players with smokeless tobacco. Then in 2012, restrictions on smokeless tobacco (which includes chewing tobacco) were implemented for baseball players at many ballparks, including Great American here in Cincinnati.

For years, Major League Baseball has seen the use of tobacco products by its players as a very negative choice for their overall health. They recognized that smokeless tobacco has at least 27 cancer-causing chemicals, and that it is known to directly cause cancer of the mouth, lip, tongue and pancreas. Other effects include oral leukoplakia (white mouth lesions), gum disease, and major gum recession. There is evidence that supports the idea it increases the risks for heart disease and diabetes, among other chronic conditions.

Hagen dental oral health blog cincinnati ohio dentist

In years past, professional baseball players have been known to use smokeless tobacco. The tie to tobacco in general was strong, even in baseball earliest days: in fact, trading cards were actually produced within cigarette packages. That kind of direct tie to tobacco existed before much was known about the consequences of tobacco.

Thankfully, today’s Major League Baseball players are often more educated about the extremely negative effects of smokeless tobacco, and more often than not, they recognize how they are role models for countless people.

Photo credit: The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum In the early 1900s, Honus Wagner famously said he would not allow tobacco companies to print his trading card. His baseball card is now one of the rarest and most expensive cards in the world! Photo credit: The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Knowing that many people pick up the negative habit by the time they are in high school—when they see their favorite athletes on TV and model their behavior—retired baseball player Sammy Sosa has been strong in his efforts to support tobacco prevention.

Part of that awareness and education was accelerated due to Tony Gwynn, a Major League player who unfortunately died of salivary gland cancer. Before his death, he said he believed it was from years of using chewing tobacco.

His death led to many baseball players, including Stephen Strasburg to quit the habit entirely, and to speak out about it. Strasburg has since said:

“It’s one of those things where I’ve done it for so long it’s just become a habit, a really bad habit…I think it’s a disgusting habit, looking back on it. I was pretty naive when I started. Just doing it here and there, I didn’t think it was going to be such an addiction. Bottom line is, I want to be around for my family.”

Despite so many players speaking out and being against the use of tobacco, the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) says that children often chew tobacco from a young age because of modeling behavior they see, whether it is baseball or another sport.

It is reported that as much as 20 percent of boys in high school use chewing tobacco, and 1 out of 2 in that group develop pre-cancerous patches in their mouth as a result. Many of those tobacco users are boys who play on youth baseball teams.

A prevailing myth is that just because chewing tobacco and other smokeless tobacco does not impact the lungs, it is not as bad for you.

This myth could not be further from the truth!

The truth is that smokeless tobacco leads to higher incidences of cavities and oral cancer. Interestingly, out of a group of men in a study who gave up cigarettes for smokeless tobacco, they still had higher death rates from lung cancer after, according to the American Cancer Society.

Do you have a friend or relative who should read this blog post to know about the risks associated with smokeless tobacco? Be sure to send them information that can prevent them from taking on a bad habit.

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Happy National Dentist Day

Friday, March 6th, 2015

It’s our kind of day today! We hope you have a day full of smiles.

Hagen Dental Cincinnati Happy National Dentist Day