Phone (513) 251-5500

Posts Tagged ‘@hagendental’

The Future of Dentistry is Here!

Monday, March 27th, 2017

“Dentistry” as we know it has come a long way since its ancient origins. Over hundreds of years, oral care, dental knowledge, hygiene practices, cleaning and surgical procedures have developed into the modern day dental advances we know, enjoy and appreciate today.

As you know, Hagen Dental Practice is proud to offer the latest and greatest when it comes to today’s dental innovations!

dentistry innovations

A Long History Full of Improvements

Not surprisingly, the 20th century boasts some of the most meaningful innovations and advancements throughout this long history of dental practice. To start, the 20th century saw the standardization of operative procedures and instrumentation, as well as the improvement of dental training and text books.

Dental practices also started becoming more comfortable during this time. In 1905, a German chemist formulated the local anesthetic now known as Novocain that helps numb feeling in the tissues being worked on. Fifty years later, in 1958, a fully reclining dental chair was introduced to the profession, allowing patients to sit more comfortably during dental appointments.

We know how important it is to have a comfortable and relaxing environment when you come in to see us!

Along with better education for Dentists, the training of dental hygienists was also initiated and improved. Their practice of cleaning teeth was shown to greatly reduce the incidence of cavities among the children being worked on, which launched the dental hygienist movement to complement existing dental practices.

As the century continued, toothpaste and toothbrush quality saw improvements and changes. Nylon was introduced as material for toothbrush bristles, and fluoride was added to paste. New filling materials and bonding resins improved the outcomes of dental work. Lasers were approved for soft tissue work, and the first commercial electric toothbrush went to market.

Moving into Cosmetic Dentistry

In the late 1980’s, home tooth bleaching became a possibility with new commercial products offered on the market. During the 1990’s, dental care expanded to allow for cosmetic accommodations for patients, not just practical or essential dental work. Other innovations included new tooth-colored restorative materials, implants and veneers became available.

tech continues to advance in dentistry

Technology Continues To Enhance The Care We Provide You

In the 21st century, dental advancements and technology developments have not slowed down. We continue to see improvements for patient care, cleaning procedures, restorative processes and preventative care.

Several of these advancements have arisen in the way we perform imaging and cavity detection. At Hagen Dental, we are proud to utilize digital x-ray technology which offers a decreased amount of radiation to our patients, the removal of strong developing chemicals from our office, and faster, more reliable access to the images of your mouth.

We also use a Laser Scanner, which can detect smaller cavities up to years earlier than traditional x-ray and visual examination. This means finding the cause of sensitivity and pain earlier, and allowing more of your natural tooth to remain intact and in your mouth with earlier treatment.

The Best Clean Possible

New cleaning technological advances that are now available mean a better removal of plaque and calculus from your teeth. At Hagen Dental, we offer the best cleaning possible with the use of the Piezo Scaler to more quickly and effectively clean your teeth and gums thoroughly. This tool utilizes high-frequency vibrations to perform the best clean possible.

Detecting serious health issues as early as possible means a better survival and cure rate. Diseases such as oral cancer are more easily cured in early stages. We are thrilled to offer our patients access to a VELscope exam, which is a quick and easy examination designed to effectively identify any abnormal tissues in the oral cavity. By using this efficient technology, we can detect issues much sooner for better outcomes.

Many of the restorative care improvements that have been developed in recent years means better value and time savings for our patients. This is why we love the CEREC technology that was developed in the late 1980’s and has been gaining in popularity in recent years. CEREC stands for Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics.

The CEREC process allows dentists to design, construct and insert individual ceramic restorations for a tooth that has decayed, is weakened, or is broken. It can also be used to remove and replace old or defective fillings. CEREC is extremely precise and durable, making them the most reliable restorative process currently available in the dental market. They are natural-looking and long lasting. The best part? This restoration process can take place in one visit.

hagen dental in cincinnati

Call Hagen Dental Practice Today

Ready to experience some of the great technological advances available to you at Hagen Dental? Call us today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule your complimentary consultation.

Sources

  1. http://www.ada.org/en/about-the-ada/ada-history-and-presidents-of-the-ada/ada-history-of-dentistry-timeline

6 Habits You Didn’t Realize Were Harming Your Teeth

Monday, February 6th, 2017

Life can get busy. And as the minutes and days and activities and events pass by, bad habits can start to form as we fall into our routines – sometimes before we are even aware of them. Let’s dive into some of the most common tooth-related negative habits, so you can avoid these pitfalls and keep your teeth strong and healthy.

avoid these negative dental habits

Chewing Ice

Chewing on ice weakens the enamel and surface areas of your teeth. Because ice is so hard, chewing on it repeatedly leads to uneven wear and tear, and long term will cause permanent chips and cracks in the teeth, which will damage the underlying tooth structure. Eventually, the cracks become large enough that you will require a trip to the dentist for repair. Ice isn’t the only culprit for this type of damage!

Habitually chewing on other hard items like pens, pencils, bobby pins, or paperclips can cause the same damage. If you need to break this habit, try keeping these items out of reach, substitute your chewing urge for sugarless gum, or avoid putting ice in your drinks while you learn to resist the urge (1, 2).

Using Your Teeth As ‘Tools’

Are you in the habit of using your teeth to crack open bottle caps, rip off clothing tags, hold heavy objects, or even as a replacement for scissors when trying to open those tough plastic bags? These and similar actions put traumatic pressure on the bones in the mouth, increasing your likelihood for weakened teeth, chips and cracks in the bone. Try to remember that teeth are there for eating (and smiling!); they are not meant to be used as a substitute for knives, scissors and hands (1,2).

Skipping Your Nighttime Brushing

Late nights out, bedtime snacks, or falling asleep in front of the television can all lead to one bad habit: skipping or forgetting your night time brushing routine. All the sugars and particles from the food and beverages you had since your last brushing session will be left to wreak havoc on your gums and enamel all night long. If you are guilty of this habit, try starting your bedtime rituals a little bit earlier – before you get too sleepy. Once you have brushed, don’t eat or drink anything else except water.

don't skip your night time brushing

Sugary Drinks

Sugary drinks, especially soda, bathe your teeth in an acidic and sugary environment. This dangerous combination creates the perfect environment for erosion, bacteria growth and decay. Sodas aren’t the only culprit, however. Fruit juices, sports drinks, and alcoholic beverages, especially mixed drinks, can contain surprising amounts of sugar and acids as well. Cut back your sugary drinks to a minimal number – or avoid them all together – and when you do indulge, drink through a straw and rinse your mouth with plain water in between drinks until you can get home and brush (1,2).

Playing Sports Without A Mouth Guard

According to the American Dental Association, an estimated 5 million teeth are knocked out every year during sports activities and competitions. Mouth guards successfully prevent approximately 200,000 sports-related mouth injuries each year. How many more could be prevented if participants were more diligent about wearing mouth guards? Rough play during high impact sports can occur at any time. Mouth guards are recommended for the following sports: basketball, football, lacrosse, water polo, hockey, softball, skateboarding, rugby, mixed martial arts and soccer. The guard helps cushion rapid or hard blows to the teeth and jaw, lessening your risk for soft tissue injury or tooth loss (2).

avoid tooth loss with mouth guard use

Smoking

If you still smoke or chew tobacco, here’s another petition for you to find a way to quit. Nicotine yellows your teeth and can contribute to or cause oral cancers. Tobacco products also dry out your mouth and increase the amount of plaque buildup around your teeth. Smokers have a higher risk of gum disease and tooth loss because of these changes in the conditions of the oral cavity. If you have questions about quitting, discuss them with Dr. Hagen at your next appointment (1,2).

Give Us A Call at Hagen Dental Practice

Need help or advice on how to kick any of these habits, or ensure you don’t have damage already? Call us at (513) 251-5500 to learn more about your dental needs and how to develop positive oral habits!

Sources

  1. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/your-teeth-bad-habits#1
  2. http://www.onhealth.com/content/1/protect_teeth_dental_health

Be Ready For the Mistletoe With These Breath-Boosting Tips

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

The holiday season is upon us! And with it, a host of office Christmas parties, invitations to dinners, white elephant exchanges with your friends, and ugly sweater get-togethers.

Mistletoe can be hiding in the eaves of any social gathering, so it is a great time of year to ensure your breath is fresh, whether you want to be ready for a quick peck under the mistletoe with your crush, or a long smooch with your spouse. Use these dental hygiene and better breath tips as part of your holiday-ready routine!

is-your-breath-ready-for-mistletoe

The Quick-Fix Options

Carrying a small travel (or even disposable) toothbrush and small tube of toothpaste is a great option, especially if you’re planning on going straight to a holiday get-together right after a long day of work or school. Even if you forget the paste, brushing with just water can offer a little bit of help to reduce the microbes collecting in your mouth after meals.

Flossing with a mint flavored dental floss helps remove food particles from your recent meal. Flossing on the go can be made more realistic with products such as disposable floss picks.

Gargle with an anti-bacterial mouthwash for 20-30 seconds. Many mouthwashes come in small travel-sized bottles that will fit in your pocket, purse, car or desk. This will help fight bacteria in the mouth that contribute to bad breath and give you an instant odor freshener (1).

Chew on a stick of sugar-free or natural gum. Since dry mouth can lead to bad breath, and gum stimulates saliva production, gum is a helpful choice. As an added bonus, gum can remove some of the food particles left in small gaps in your teeth. Find a nice peppermint flavor for an instant odor cover-up (1).

Chew on a sprig of mint. This herb doesn’t clean your teeth, but will offer a strong minty smell to cover up bad breath temporarily. Just be sure to check the mirror for any stray remnants of the green leaf before heading into the party.

Chew on nuts. This option works well if you are already at the party, and have none of the other options available to you. Nuts have a strong aroma. Additionally, the abrasive texture of nuts will help remove residue or food particles from the teeth, tongue and gums (2).

Order your water with lemon or lime. This acidic, citrusy combination is a powerful tool against bad breath. The moisture of the water keeps your mouth from getting too dry, which helps minimize odor. The acidity of the citrus fruit combats bacteria and masks the odor with its fresh flavor (1).

The Long Term Story: How to Prevent Breath Issues

Once the party is over, it is important you take a step back and find out the underlying cause of your bad breath. Was it just a garlic-laden lunch? Or is the halitosis (bad breath) something you deal with regularly? It could be your oral hygiene habits need a tune-up, or something more serious at play.

Proper dental hygiene habits, such as consistently using floss, mouthwash, and brushing regularly are your best defense against bad breath. These daily habits serve to keep bacteria, food particles and inflammation to a minimum. Ensuring you stick to a regular dental checkup schedule will help keep teeth clean and serve to catch any underlying problems as early as possible, or before they become a big problem.

Staying hydrated is also important to prevent dry mouth induced bad breath. Drinking hot tea after a meal helps to remove food particles, and also contains polyphenols which discourage the growth of bad breath causing bacteria.

However, if bad breath is already a frequent problem, call us to schedule an examination. Chronically foul smelling breath can be a sign of gingivitis, periodontitis, plaque buildup, infections, cavities, gastritis, or poor brushing habits. It is imperative that you consult with Dr. Hagen to discover and eliminate the offender before it affects your long term health.

dont-let-bad-breath-ruin-your-day

Worried About Getting Too Close?

We never want your dental health concerns to get in the way of your personal relationships. Call Hagen Dental practice today to discuss how we can help! (513) 251-5500

Sources:

  • http://www.wikihow.com/Fix-Bad-Breath-on-the-Spot
  • http://www.livescience.com/40052-get-rid-bad-breath.html
  • http://whole30.com/2016/05/whole30-fresh-breath/

What to Know About Oral Cancer, Eating Disorders & Decalcification

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

eating disorders and oral health

More than 10 million Americans are affected by serious eating disorders. These disorders can have serious ramifications for your overall health, as well as your oral health!2

A Serious Subject: Eating Disorders & Your Health

Two of the most common eating disorders are bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa. Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by repeated, excessive eating, followed by self-induced vomiting, also known as purging. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by an extreme fear of gaining weight, a desire to be thin, self-induced starvation, and the inability to maintain a normal weight.

Both conditions deprive the body of crucial vitamins, minerals, proteins and other nutrients required to maintain good health, including oral health. These deficiencies can lead to decalcification of the teeth.3

Decalcification is an early form of tooth decay and damage that can lead to further injuries or breakdown of teeth, more serious tooth decay, and cavities.

Eating disorders can also cause bad breath, tenderness of the mouth and throat, as well as swelling in the salivary glands. These disorders can lead to dry mouth, cracked lips, sores in the mouth, bleeding gums, and sensitivity of the teeth.1,2

The self-induced vomiting that occurs with bulimia nervosa causes powerful digestive acids from the stomach (that normally aren’t found in the mouth) to come in contact with the teeth. This acid attacks and wears away at the tooth enamel, causing erosion. This frequent purging can also change the color, shape, or even length of the teeth!1

Those with anorexia nervosa can experience osteoporosis and severe malnutrition, leading to weakening of the bones. This includes weakening of the jaw bone as well as weakening of the teeth and enamel, or even tooth breakage or loss.1

Long-Term Negative Health Effects

Long term malnutrition from eating disorders can lead to increased susceptibility to infections and other negative health effects.

The repeated vomiting of bulimia can damage the lining of the esophagus because of the repeated contact with the strong stomach acid and the micro-traumas of the tissue associated with the purging. A very small percentage of bulimics can develop bulimia-related cancer due to the damage to the esophagus.4

What to Know About Oral Cancer

Concerned about oral cancer? Early warning signs include lumps or growths in the mouth, throat or neck, patchy areas or lesions in the tissues of the mouth, hoarseness or difficulty swallowing, unusual bleeding, or persistent sores that don’t heal. Recall that when you come in for your regular visit, we look for signs of cancer—after all, we’re trained to do so.

Prevention and regular dental checkups are key when it comes to proper oral health as well as preventing oral cancer! Additionally, a healthy, nourishing diet is important to give your mouth and teeth the building blocks it needs to stay healthy.

prevention at hagen dds practice in cincinnati

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

If you or someone you know suffers from an eating disorder, it is important that you seek professional help as soon as possible. Overcoming the eating disorder is the first step to healing the effects of the acid and nutrient deficiencies that come along with these conditions.

We can help you restore and work with some of the problems created from eating disorders (and that’s part of why we want to know about your health history, too.) Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

References/Sources:

  1. http://www.yourdentistryguide.com/eating-disorder/
  2. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/Teens/concerns
  3. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/decalcification
  4. http://www.bulimiahelp.org/articles/bulimia-and-cancer-what-you-need-know
  5. http://www.atooth.com/oral-cancer/

 

Minerals and Vitamins for a Healthy Smile

Saturday, August 20th, 2016

the health of your teeth hagen dental

Good oral hygiene practices are essential for a healthy smile. But have you ever wondered if your diet supports the best building blocks to keep those teeth strong? Mineral deficiencies can lead to weak bones and teeth. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin D are all important minerals and vitamins when it comes to preventing tooth decay and oral health issues. Check out these lists of foods that support you in your quest for strong, healthy teeth.

Calcium — Your teeth and jaw are formed and kept strong with the use of lots of calcium. Regular intake of this mineral helps keep your teeth enamel and jaw bones strong and healthy. Most of the body’s calcium is stored in the bones (teeth included!), while some circulates in the bloodstream for other uses. Consuming too little calcium can put you at risk of gum disease and tooth decay, and you will leech calcium from the bone to use for other body functions.

Sources of Calcium: Kale, tofu, chia seeds, sardines, canned salmon, green leafy vegetables such as collard greens, spinach and kale, dairy products, cauliflower, cabbage, almonds, bok choy, figs, and sesame seeds.1, 6

Phosphorus — Calcium and phosphorus work together to maximize the strength of bones and teeth. Without phosphorus, calcium can’t do it’s job properly. The combination of these two minerals is essential in children, whose bones and teeth are developing and forming their hard structure.

Sources of phosphorus: Pumpkin seeds, romano cheese, salmon, shellfish, almonds and other nuts, pork, beef, tofu, eggs, grapes, citrus fruit, cucumbers, tomatoes, beans and lentils.4, 8

your teeth health hagen dental cincinnatiMagnesium — Magnesium helps to build strong enamel for your teeth, as well as proper tooth formation. It also helps prevent the formation of cavities. Magnesium also works well alongside calcium for many functions.

Sources of Magnesium: Dark chocolate, green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and swiss chard, black beans, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, brown rice, cashews, salmon, raisins and avocado.2, 3, 7

Vitamin D — Vitamin D regulates the body’s balance of calcium and phosphorus and can promote their absorption. Vitamin D also helps to decrease inflammation of gums which is associated with periodontal disease.

Sources of Vitamin D: Natural sunlight (your body produces vitamin D with exposure to sun! This is your BEST source of D), shellfish, fish such as salmon, catfish and mackerel, eggs and butter.4, 5

These lists aren’t the only places to find these great bone builders, but they are a great place to start. See something new? Be adventurous this week and try a new recipe. Try to incorporate some of these foods in your regular diet alongside your other dental care routine. You’ll enjoy them knowing you are helping build and maintain a healthy smile.hagen dental cincinnati ohio

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at(513) 251-5500.

Sources/References used directly in this article:

1.http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/6-vitamins-and-minerals-your-mouth-needs/

2. http://www.123dentist.com/important-minerals-and-vitamins-for-your-oral-health

3.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/17/magnesium-benefits.aspx

4. https://www.dhsv.org.au/dental-advice/teeth-tips-and-facts/calcium-vitamin-d-and-phosphorus

5.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/11/12/vitamin-d1.aspx

6. http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/blog/whole-story/non-dairy-sources-calcium

7. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/

8. https://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/high-phosphorus-foods.php

Getting Into the Valentine’s Day Spirit—The Healthy Way

Saturday, February 6th, 2016

dentist in cincinnati hagen dental ddsAs we get into the Valentine’s Day spirit, here are two main ways we can stay heart-healthy and happy this February.

Exercise for Your Heart

Whether you have a special someone in your life this Valentine’s Day or not, one thing is still true: cardio (or cardiovascular) exercise is important for the health of your heart because it increases your heart rate and increases your blood circulation.

Besides being good for your heart, cardio makes us feel better, strengthens our bones in many cases, reduce stress and anxiety, helps us sleep better, and research has shown it adds years to your life expectancy. (Source.)

When we maintain our cardiovascular fitness, we are “working” our heart, which makes sure that is stays strong.

As you likely know, there are quite a few different varieties of cardio exercise. Whether it’s cycling or running (which just might be our favorites) or another form such as an organized sport team you play on, get in cardio exercise so that you can work your heart muscle just like you would want to work any other muscle in your body!

Not only are you helping your heart stay in shape, but with regular cardio, you can help support your metabolism, help manage your weight, improve your ability to recover from workouts in general, and for those with diabetes, cardio actually can help you manage your condition.

Pro tip: use a heart rate monitor to really see how hard you training. Many of the heart monitors today are very affordable and some can even get data from your wrist.

dentist west side of cincinnati hagen dental dds

Eat for Your Heart

Eating for the health of our heart involves eating foods that support our nutritional needs, including vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. This also means eating in a way that doesn’t spur too much inflammation in the body.

While Valentine’s Day may mean a time to reach for some candy treats including sour candies and hard candies, just remember when we eat foods high in added sugar, over time, we can do damage to the body.

And yes, we also have to mention how the constant sugar on your teeth is harmful—and not to mention it sometimes can even result in a broken or chipped tooth!

But when it comes to our diet, more specifically, too much sugar can mean your body is not getting the nutrients it needs. That is because sugar contains calories that lack nutrient value, but at the same time they can still be quite high in calories. Additionally, when we eat lots of sugar regularly, it can result in insulin resistance (2). You can also think about it this way: while inflammation is a natural response in our body, if we have too much of it—which can happen when we eat too much sugar—it is thought to play a role in heart disease, certain cancers and in obesity.

Smile- and heart-friendly options that you can choose instead of all the hard, sour or gummy candies that can be popular around Valentine’s Day include:

  • Fun finger foods that can still be healthy such as stuffed mushrooms
  • “Tater tots” made from sweet potatoes
  • Fruit skewers: fruit that you put on kabobs—think blueberries, strawberries or another fruit if you are sticking to a color theme
  • Watermelon or another melon “cut out” using a heart cookie cutter. If you put these on kabobs, you can call them “Cupid Kabobs”
  • Mini smoothies made with no added sugar. You can even top it off with a red or heart-themed straw!

Healthy Choices: That’s Something We Love to Hear!

Whether you choose some of these more healthy and fun alternatives or not this Valentine’s Day, find what works for you by looking for lifestyle changes that you can sustain. Be sure to look to incorporate nutrient-dense foods that support your level of activity! It’s never a bad idea to educate yourself on just how much added sugar you’re consuming! This alone might be motivation so that you can cut back on sugar-added drinks that offer very little nutrients.

References/Sources

  1. http://www.livescience.com/36723-exercise-life-expectancy-overweight-obese.html
  1. http://whole9life.com/2010/06/sugar-sugar-sugar/

How to Choose Your Dentist

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

cincinnati dentist familyTime to choose a new dentist? Maybe you moved or maybe you haven’t been to the dentist in recent years. Whatever the case may be, what are the top things you should know as you look for a new dentist?

Your Dental Needs: How to Get the Highest Level of Care

When it comes to choosing your dentist, one of the biggest things you don’t want to do is choose your dentist based solely on your insurance plan since, after all, dental insurance is very limited and is not focused on quality of your care.

Some of the factors that many patients look for include:

  • Personalized, approachable and friendly team
  • Transparency around treatment options, and openness, or the ability, to ask questions about care or recommended care
  • Comfortable environment in the office at all times during your visit
  • Respect of your time
  • Modern technology & superior service offerings
  • Strong expertise and experience
  • Family-oriented

These are what are patients are usually looking for, which helps them find a match at Hagen Dental.

You want a dentist focused on your overall health and well-being, as well as your specific oral health needs. Here are 3 other factors to consider when looking for a dentist.

Ask questions!

Don’t be afraid to ask questions about a dentist’s approach, the technology/services they offer, and/or about the dental team. Keep in mind that most dentists would love to tell you about their ongoing education and about their approach to your health. If desired, ask about the available services and technology, and take a look at their website if appropriate.

Talk to family and friends.

Don’t be afraid to also pick up the phone and ask friends and family about their dentist. We are proud that our patients refer us to many of their family members and friends.

Being referred by a friend, colleague or family member is a great way to know the dentist you will be going to is friendly, that the office environment is comfortable, and that they will care about your health.

Evaluate after your visit.

There are many questions you can ask after your first visit. Was the office clean and orderly? Did the approach of the dentist align with what you were looking for? Was the team and office welcoming? Did you feel you could trust your dentist and ask him questions?

If you came to Hagen Dental for your first visit, you would be able to hear how Dr. Hagen received his dental degree from The Ohio State University School of Dentistry. He is also president of the Greater Cincinnati Dental Study Club and a member of the American Dental Association, Ohio Dental Association, and Cincinnati Dental Society.

Dr. Hagen has undergone extensive postgraduate education over the years, including training in whole mouth rehabilitation, CEREC™ one-visit restorations, and crown and bridge restorations, allowing him to provide you with the state-of-the-art options (see more of them here) for obtaining the smile of your dreams. His training in sleep dentistry also allows him to offer alternative treatments for sleep apnea for better overall health.

While the first visit if of course focused on the patietn, you also might hear how Dr. Hagen’s commitment to lifelong education means he is constantly evaluating emerging dental methods and technologies, so that patients can have the latest and greatest available.

Dr. Hagen is focused on your total health, so he wants to see you with the best results, in the least invasive manner, all with a high emphasis on comfort.

Wherever you go, after that first visit, be sure to evaluate and make sure you are satisfied with your dentist and the dental team. You deserve the highest quality of care, an easy-to-talk to dentist, a friendly team, and state-of-the-art technology.

We Look Forward to Meeting You and Your Entire Family

At Hagen Dental, we know that many patients have different levels of apprehension about visiting the dentist, and the most important thing we can do first is to listen to our patients. We want to know about your unique needs and how we can help you have confidence and be happy with your (oral) health.

Whether you or your loved ones are concerned about pain, have had past dental experience that has been traumatic, or are simply ashamed of your own perceived dental shortcomings, we will treat you with compassion and understanding. Give us a call today (513) 251-5500 or see more on our website at hagendds.com

The Complete Guide to Dry Mouth: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

Dry Mouth

“It seems like my mouth is drier than normal.”

This is what someone may think or say when they are experiencing abnormal dry mouth.

Chronic dry mouth, also called xerostomia, is when we have a lack of saliva or when we have a reduced amount of saliva.

While the actual incidents of chronic dry mouth increase as people age, dry mouth is not a normal part of aging.

Symptoms of Dry Mouth

Dry mouth is a sticky, parched and potentially gritty feeling in the mouth.

But also know that the following are other symptoms of dry mouth:

  • Bad breath
  • Different sense of taste (or a taste disorder)
  • Lipstick sticking to teeth
  • Increased need to drink water
  • Inflamed tongue
  • Cracked lips
  • A red or raw tongue
  • A dry feeling in your throat
  • Abnormal difficulties in chewing or speaking

There are many reasons why we can experience dry mouth, and dry mouth is more common than you would think. The simplest explanation for dry mouth is an inadequate function of our salivary glands.Why Dry Mouth Occurs

Over the counter and prescription drugs can impact the saliva in our mouths. Take for example blood pressure medications and antihistamines, just two examples—of as many as 400 medications—that can alter the saliva level in the mouth.

But there are other health-related reasons that can result in dry mouth:

  • Radiation treatment for head and neck cancer
  • Salivary gland disease
  • Emotional stress
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Chemotherapy
  • Nerve damage
  • Snoring or breathing through your mouth
  • Other medical conditions including diabetes, HIV/AIDs and Sjogren’s syndrome

Talk with your dentist about the medications you are taking and any other changes in your health to help determine the cause of your dry mouth. Remember that when we age, particularly over the age of 50, our body’s thirst sensation may reduce. If we aren’t drinking enough water each day, this can contribute to dry mouth.

The Negative Effects of Dry Mouth

Saliva helps us chew, start digestion, protects our teeth from decay, and helps heal sores that are in our mouths. It also helps prevent infection by controlling bacteria and fungi in the mouth. Accelerated tooth decay can develop if we have dry mouth, and our ability to digest properly can also be affected if we have trouble chewing.

What We Can Do

Do you feel a sticky or (abnormal) dry feeling in your mouth? When it’s out of the norm, be sure to tell us about it. Not only is dry mouth uncomfortable, but it can lead to serious health consequences and it can also signal a health condition you need to be aware of. When you see us, we can take a look at any medications you share with us to help determine the cause, as well help you with steps to ensure you are careful and protective of your teeth. We can also potentially suggest a prescription-strength fluoride gel that can help prevent dental decay.

Before you come in to see your dentist, be sure to also:

  • Avoid drinks with caffeine which can further dry the mouth out
  • Drink water and sugarless drinks
  • If you have a humidifier, use it at night
  • Avoid tobacco and alcohol which dry out the mouth
  • Be careful with spicy or salty foods which can cause pain in a dry mouth

Want to know more about Hagen Dental? Visit us here or give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

How Acid Reflux Can Damage Your Teeth

Saturday, November 15th, 2014

Dental erosion: it’s when acids wear away at the enamel on our teeth.

Eating lots of acidic foods is one of the major reasons we see erosion. Once this erosion occurs, the teeth can look shiny and a bit deficient compared to the parts of our teeth that do not have erosion.

When we lose or damage our enamel, it cannot be brought back. This erosion is a problem because our enamel is what gives our teeth their structure, and shape. We then see the underlying dentin being exposed.

Hagen Dental DDS BlogIt’s safe to say that most of us want to avoid any loss of tooth structure. So what are some signs you may have tooth erosion? Here are a few:

  • Sensitivity
  • Change in tooth form/shape
  • Cracks in the edges of teeth
  • Small dent-like appearances on your teeth
  • Discoloration
  • “Transparent” looking teeth

Knowing that acid reflux directly contributes to teeth erosion, let’s examine acid reflux a bit more.

What’s acid reflux and how does it happen?
We have a muscular ring between the end of our esophagus and our stomach. This ring is what helps keep our day-to-day stomach acid within the stomach, where it helps us digest properly. In some situations, this sphincter muscle does not work as it should, and as a result, our stomach acid comes up into our esophagus. (Sometimes you’ll hear this muscle called the LES, short for the lower esophageal sphincter muscle.)

But is this muscle all to blame as the cause of acid reflux? The answers is that as much as 90 percent of most heartburn cases are due to the foods/beverages we eat, meaning that for many of us, we are able to avoid or keep our heartburn to a minimum.

Besides being a major culprit for teeth erosion, acid reflux also contributes to bad breath. That’s just one more reason to be aware of how we to work to avoid acid reflux.

One of the ways to avoid tooth erosion (and of course the discomfort) that come with acid reflux is to look at the foods you are eating, as well as when you are eating them.

Although it varies from person to person, we compiled a list of some of the biggest offenders.

  • Meats, with especially acid sauces or chicken/buffalo wings
  • Grains, especially those with tomato sauces added
  • Dairy, including sour cream and even ice cream
  • Specialty drinks such as coffee, liquor, wine or tea
  • Fats, certain oils, and sweets. This can be chocolate, donuts, butter cookies, or even potato chips.

This list shows that across all categories of food, we can find highly acid foods and drinks that can contribute to acid reflux.

So what’s missing from this list?

You guessed it: juices, fruits, and vegetables. Most of us recognize how orange juice, lemons, lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, tomato or raw onions are some of the foods that are also on this list.

In general, look to neutralize the acid in your stomach when acid reflux does occur, and also be sure to tell us if you are having a problem. If you do have extreme gastric-related issues, or a chronic problem with acid reflux, we can also help. Also be sure to tell us if you smoke, since that’s a major contributor to acid reflux that leads to teeth erosion for many people. Link to hagendds.com

Look to cut back on the number of acidic foods you are snacking on throughout the day. This way, you are minimizing the amount of time acid is exposed to your teeth.

Oral Cancer: Frequently Asked Questions

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

How does oral cancer start?

Oral, or mouth cancer, can refer to any kind of cancerous tissue growth in our oral cavities, can come from neighboring anatomy (such as the nose), or it can simply originate in the mouth. As you may or may not know, cancer can be best understood as a result of a mutation of our DNA.

When our cells operate in these abnormal ways, we can see them as red or white patches on our soft tissue, or as spots in our mouth that simply won’t heal. Most oral cancers are cancer of the epithelial cells. We see this classification of cancer in the tissue in our mouths and/or lips in most cases. 

Woral cancer cincinnati ohio what you need to knowhat are some of the common warning signs of oral cancer?

This is exactly why you come in to see us on a regular basis—we are checking for the early signs of oral cancer through screening each time we see you. If we were to see unusual lumps or ulceration that are not healing, we would want to know more. These skin lesions can be on the tongue, lip, or around the mouth. They can be white, red, or best describes as “pale” in color.

In other cases, signs or symptoms are mouth sores, or even pain in more advanced cases. And still in other situations, people have issues with tongue movement. Many of us have had some sort of unusual feeling, or possibly a sore in our mouth at one time or another, so the best course of action is to come in and see us if you are concerned.

The key is early detection, which in the case of oral cancer, greatly improves one’s survival rate.

What causes oral cancer?

Approximately two thirds of oral cancers are actually due to our behaviors. You may have already heard how in particular, heavy alcohol use and tobacco are two behaviors we know contribute to a rise in likelihood for oral cancer. Part of the reason why tobacco is so harmful for us is that tobacco has more than 60 known carcinogens.

Also keep in mind that chewing tobacco is putting this exposure directly onto our tissue. Chewing tobacco/snuff also (intentionally) is designed to irritate our mucous membranes (for quicker absorption), which is even worse for our oral health.

With that said, be aware that the majority of new cases of oral cancer are HPV-related.

That also means more young people are getting oral cancer today, a fact that surprises many.

Poor oral hygiene habits, as well as cases of chronic infection, have also been found to result in increasing one’s chance of oral cancer. Other risk factors include ultraviolet light (from sunlight or tanning beds) and infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). In some cases, these symptoms are

Seeing a dentist regularly, maintaining good oral hygiene habits over time, and avoiding tobacco are all very beneficial for us in terms of taking control of our lifestyle habits.