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Posts Tagged ‘Hagen Dental Practice’

Hagen Dental Practice: Featured Services

Thursday, June 14th, 2018

Take a look at a few of featured services below.

hagen dental featured services

You can view the PDF version of this infographic here.

20 Little Known Facts About Bad Breath

Tuesday, April 24th, 2018

bad breath and your mouth

Here are 20 things you may not know about bad breath.

1. Many times, bad breath is treatable. That’s because in many cases, foul-smelling breath is caused by the breakdown of food (and the presence of bacteria) in the mouth! If you think about it, that’s actually good news…

2. That said, periodontal disease (aka gum disease), also causes bad breath. That’s less of an issue of just brushing your teeth or flossing to get rid of food debris and bacteria; That’s reflective of poor oral health habits resulting in disease in the mouth. All in all, that’s a condition that occurs over time, as you can imagine.

3. Ever heard of “garlic breath”? It’s a term coined from how you can have less-than-desirable breath after eating garlic. Research has actually shown that part of the reason garlic breath can happen is actually due to digestion.

4. Similar to garlic, bad breath can also be caused by onion, which is another member of the allium family. Even if you rush for your toothbrush after eating onion (especially raw), when digested, it will cause distinctive gasses to be released. In turn, your breath can become smelly, even despite any efforts to brush and floss post-meal! (1)

5. People following a low-carb nutrition plan can be surprised by…well, different smelling breath. That’s because, in extreme cases, certain chemicals can be released as the body burns fat in a state that’s also called ketosis. In turn, we can smell that on people’s breath.

6. Ever wonder why someone with bad breath doesn’t do something about it? Part of the reason may be because people can become nose blind to their own bad breath!

7. Caffeine and coffee can give you breath that you can almost…well, taste! Since coffee and caffeine can end up drying out the mouth, you really can have latte breath. Combat this by drinking plenty of water and brushing and flossing your teeth. And, of course, keep up your regular professional cleanings and check-ups.

8. It may surprise you to learn that issues with you ear, nose and throat, and even your kidneys can end up giving you bad breath.

9. Drinking water won’t get rid of your bad breath, but it can help you fight dry mouth, which can give you bad breath. (And, keep in mind dry mouth can lead to an increase in gum disease and tooth decay, too.) The takeaway: drinking a lot of water can help you combat dehydration and dry mouth, helping you moisturize the mouth and neutralize acids.

10. Dentures can be the source of your bad breath. If you have removable dentures, be sure to keep up your regular oral health habits and clean them every night.

11. One way to guarantee better smelling breath? Giving up smoking. Not to mention it will benefit your entire health, not just your oral health.

12. One thing is clear: people want to avoid bad breath! It’s been reported that nearly three billion dollars a year is spent on gum, mints, and mouth rinses.

13. About 50 percent of the population suffers from bad breath that is caused by something other than food, drinks, or smoking cigarettes (2).

14. The name given to people who think they have bad breath, but others don’t notice it is “pseudohalitosis.” This is when someone thinks they have bad breath…but they really don’t! (2, 3)

15. Have you heard that you can check the smell of your own breath by breathing on your hand…and then smelling it? Well, believe it or not, that “test” may work in some cases, but it won’t always tell you whether or not you truly have bad breath.

16. About 60 percent of women and 50 percent of men say that they use breath freshening products.

17. Bad breath is, and can be found, in people at ANY age.

18. Infections such as strep throat, tonsillitis, and sinusitis can actually give you bad breath. Said another way, even if you’re brushing your teeth and keeping up with your oral habits, these infections can wreak havoc on your breath.

19. When you’ve done all you can and you still feel like you have bad breath, be sure to tell us! Don’t be embarrassed, as it’s just a sign of something going on with your health. We can help discover the cause, whether it is a gum-issue, infection, cavities, gum disease, due to medication, dry mouth, nutrition, illness, or another issue entirely.

20. Using a tongue scraper is a great way to eliminate odor-causing bacteria that seems to stick to your tongue. Ask us for more information.

 

bad breath hagen dental practice blog

Schedule Your Next Appointment with Hagen Dental Practice

Your dream smile is within reach! Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit. Be sure to see our new patient specials here. We’re looking forward to earning your trust with personalized care!

Sources/References:

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/get-rid-of-garlic-onion-breath
  2. https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/gastrointestinal-disorders/bad-breath-from-stomach-problems-0714
  3. https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/bad-breath/halitosis

The Legend of the Shrine of St. Patrick’s Tooth

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018

all about st patricks day tooth

Are you celebrating St. Patrick’s Day this year?

Many people know of the holiday, St. Patrick’s Day, but are just as many people familiar with the patron saint of Ireland himself? Let’s briefly look at who St. Patrick really was, and then let’s dig deeper to learn about the legend of the “Shrine of St. Patrick’s Tooth.”

Get to Know The Patron Saint of Ireland

Saint Patrick was a Christian missionary, and he’s the one that helped to convert Ireland to Christianity back around the 5th century (approximately).

Here’s what surprising: St. Patrick himself was actually not Irish, and there’s much debate on what his birthplace was and when exactly he was born. It is believed, however, that his parents were Romans who lived in Britain (1).

According to many history books, his birth name was Maewyn Succat—quite the mouthful compared to a name that’s pretty common today, Patrick! When he entered the priesthood, that’s when he took on the name Patrick.

In his teenage years, he was taken prisoner by people who had attacked the estate where he was living. In the following years, in Ireland, he was a slave. That’s when he embraced his religion and became a devout Christian.

Once he escaped slavery, he pursued religious education, eventually becoming a priest and a bishop. When he then was sent to Ireland, he ministered Christian and worked on converting other Irishmen to Christianity (2). And of course, over a period of about 40 years, he had a lot of influence, integrating Irish traditions with religion, many of which still are celebrated today! The official date for when Ireland was converted to Christianity is 432, according to the history books! (1)

legend has it about st patricks tooth

The Legends & the Great Debates Around St. Patrick

There are quite a few legends and quite a few debates when it comes to the history of St. Patrick. For example, many debate over when and where he actually died. Some say it was March 17, 460, in Downpatrick, which is part of why St. Patrick’s Day holiday is on March 17th. Others argue that’s actually his day of birth, not the date of his death (2, 3).

The Beloved Tooth of St. Patrick is Lost

Another much-talked about part of history related to St. Patrick: The Shrine of St. Patrick’s Tooth. Legend says this ornate shrine contained an actual tooth of St. Patrick’s—a tooth that was lost while he visited the Church of Killaspugbrone.

This Church was the oldest church of the Barony of Carbury. Its name comes from three words: Kill from cill, meaning church; aspug from easbog, meaning bishop,; and Brón was the name of St Patrick’s disciple (4).

Some versions of the legend claim that while on a visit to the Church, St. Patrick tripped and fell. In doing so, when he landed on the ground, he lost a tooth. As a sign of friendship and goodwill, the legend claims he then gave the tooth to Bishop Bronus (who was a native of that area). In turn, after that, it’s said that Bronus is the one who enshrined that gift in the church (5).

Then, in the 14th century, the legend says that a wooden box was created to hold the tooth. The box was made of a combination of gold, silver, and amber, among other materials. On the backside of the shrine, there is an image of King David playing the harp. That also has a lot of meaning as music meant a great deal to people during the time period this was made.

As for the front of the shrine, there is an inscription that says how the shrine was decorated for Thomas de Bermingham, Lord of Athenry (5).

But, much to the disappointment of many, the tooth that was once inside…has since entirely disappeared. Another point that’s up for debate is how the tooth was lost.

Interestingly, the box itself, meant to hold the tooth, is still around today. (See a photo of the shrine here.)

That beautiful box, despite missing the tooth, is at the National Museum of Ireland. Many come each year in order to get a glimpse, and it was even used in past years to cure sick animals!

Legends Continued…

Despite such a great deal of mystery about his life, there are other intriguing facts and stories about St. Patrick. A few include:

  • His tombstone. Historians say he was buried in Northern Ireland, and probably around the Down Cathedral (which now claims to be his burial site). Today there is a stone placed, in his memory, to mark the approximate location on the church’s grounds. That stone was actually taken from the Mourne Mountains which are nearby (2).
  • The shrive of his hand. You read that right…even his hands were seen as worthy of a dedicated shrine! Legend says that after he died, a silver holster was created in a way to replicate St. Patrick’s hand. The relic had been passed around quite a bit (among Bishops and others), and supposedly somewhere along the way, it was lost.
  • Reproductions of his tooth shrine. Today, there are even reproductions of his tooth shrine. That goes to show just how important this is to people and how much artifacts connected to St. Patrick are valued.
  • The Confession of St. Patrick. There was a letter that St. Patrick is believed to have written late in his life. It begins, “My name is Patrick. I am a sinner, a simple country person, and the least of all believers…” What it goes on to say includes his beliefs on religion, and more details that reveal some of his biography. Just like many artifacts with St. Patrick, there is much debate on this letter. Speculation exists that says he probably penned the piece when he was defending his good name after some in power had attached him (6).

Many artifacts and stories surrounding St. Patrick are speculative and there’s lots of unknowns, that’s for sure!

But it’s definitely interesting to hear how much value was placed on having one of his teeth…and having a place fully dedicated to saving that tooth–even if the tooth is now lost! 

looking forward to seeing you

Come in & Visit Hagen Dental Practice

Do you have questions about your oral health? We want to help you on your health journey, no matter where you are at today.
We’re here to help with all your dental needs. Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!

Sources:

  1. http://www.saintpatricksdayparade.com/life_of_saint_patrick.htm
  2. http://english-zone.com/holidays/st-pat.html
  3. http://mentalfloss.com/article/55485/7-artifacts-supposedly-connected-st-patrick
  4. http://gostrandhill.com/explore/history/killaspugbrone/
  5. https://stpatricksstrandhill.ie/killaspugbrone-circa-500ad/
  6. http://www.ccel.org/ccel/patrick/confession/confession.html

This Is Why Cold Weather Can Hurt Your Teeth

Monday, January 22nd, 2018

Did you know 1 in 8 people have tooth sensitivity?

Many people notice more tooth discomfort in the cold winter months than the warmer spring and summer seasons. The cold temperatures and chilly, windy air of wintertime are here to stay for a few more months and could be to blame for some of this stinging and zinging pain.

But why? Read on as we explore some of the factors involved in this cold weather phenomenon (1).

Taking a Closer Look at Cold Weather

Your teeth are very sensitive to temperature, and can vary up to 120 degrees when exposed to different hot or cold environments as well as hot or cold foods and beverages. Like most material, teeth actually expand and contract slightly as they change temperature.

hagen cincinnati

Teeth contract with exposure to cold temperature, and then expand as they warm back to body temperature. Your teeth are able to adapt to some extent, but tiny cracks and fissures can form over time due to the stress of this movement. The cracks shouldn’t affect the integrity of your teeth, but they can cause a lot of discomfort when cold air or liquid comes into contact!

Amalgam fillings (those made of mixed metal) will actually expand and contract more rapidly than the natural bone of teeth, meaning teeth with metal fillings could hurt even more than other teeth in the bitter, cold weather (1, 2).

Exposed Layers

The enamel is the outer, protective layer of your teeth. If the enamel has started to wear away, the next layer – the dentin – becomes exposed. Dentin is very sensitive due to the nerve endings found in this layer. This layer of the tooth can sense extreme changes in temperature more readily, and will create nerve irritation without the full shelter of the enamel that is typically covering it.

Dentin exposure can be caused from the tiny cracks mentioned above, damage to the tooth, long term wear and tear from rough brushing, home whitening kits, or even highly acidic foods (1, 2).

Root exposure will also cause abrupt pain when this part of the tooth comes in contact with cold air or liquid. The root of the tooth can become exposed by brushing too hard or with cross friction. They can also become exposed due to gum recession from grinding or gum disease. Dr. Hagen can help with determining the cause of gum recession, as well as give tips on proper brushing motions (3).

Jaw Tension

It’s not uncommon to unconsciously clench your jaw in colder weather. Some people have a tendency to tighten up their muscles (often the arms, shoulders, jaws, etc.) in an attempt to keep warm. This can put unnecessary and painful pressure on your jaw and the teeth (1).

Sinus Pressure

Seasonal allergies and sinus issues can show up during cold months. Sinus infections, fluid backup and pressure in the sinuses will often cause tooth pain because of their proximity to the oral cavity and teeth. Many people will mistake this feeling as tooth pain when it is really the referral from nearby tissues. Figuring out the cause of the sinus issue will help alleviate the oral pain in this case (1).

cincinnati dentist

What to Do About Sensitivity or Pain

Tips for reducing cold weather tooth pain start with protection and prevention. Try breathing through your nose instead of your mouth, or wearing a scarf or mask over your mouth while you’re out in the elements (4).

Good oral hygiene habits are of upmost importance when it comes to preventing sensitive teeth and other painful tooth difficulties. Be sure to brush and floss regularly to reduce your risk of decay or infection.

Hagen Dental is your resource for figuring out the cause of your tooth pain. We can perform an examination and do x-rays, if needed, to discover the issue. Switching to sensitive toothpaste can often help ease the discomfort. Other times, we may recommend painting a protective varnish on any teeth that show wear and tear of the enamel and are particularly sensitive.

Though many times the pain can be an easy fix, it is extremely important to get checked. Pain, whether temperature related or not, can signal more serious underlying issues with the health of your teeth and mouth. Tooth pain can be caused from defective fillings, recessed gums, tooth grinding, infection, cavities and other problems. Often times, the cold will just exacerbate the pain that was actually caused by one of those issues.

We want to catch cavities, infection, damage, or other disease sooner than later in order to keep you healthy. Let us know if you have any pain, discomfort or other issues so that we can help!

Schedule An Appointment with Hagen Dental Practice

We are excited to meet you and your family. Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!  Or, give us a call at (513) 251-5500 today!.

Sources:

  1. http://thedentistsofficefallon.com/burr-is-cold-weather-making-your-teeth-hurt/
  2. https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/tooth-sensitivity-in-cold-weather.html
  3. http://www.familycedarrapidsdentist.com/cold-weather-effects-your-teeth
  4. https://www.carefreedental.com/resources/24-your-teeth/58-how-does-the-winter-affect-your-teeth

 

New Year, New Brush Head

Wednesday, January 17th, 2018

toothbrush facts and oral health hagen dental practice in cincicnnati ohio

Can you remember the last time you changed out your toothbrush?

Maybe it was when you came in to see us!

Whether or not that was the last time you replaced your toothbrush head, here are a few of the things we think you should know about toothbrush care…

Toothbrush Replacement: Here’s What to Know

Did you know that there’s millions of bacteria growing in your mouth!? And, of course your toothbrush is a fertile breeding ground many of those viruses and bacteria, including ones that make you feel…well, not so great!

The American Dental Association recommends that you change out your toothbrush (or brush head) every 3-4 months, at minimum. If you see that the bristles look worn, its definitely time to trade out your toothbrush for a new one so it’s still working as well as it should (1)!

Here’s just a few more reasons to remember to trade out that toothbrush:

  • Your toothbrush is typically stored in the bathroom, a place with a ton of germs! By regularly switching out your toothbrush, you can help avoid some of microorganisms that may come and go in your bathroom environment. (Yes, a little gross when you stop and think about it!)
  • If you find that you often are that person getting sick in the winter, you might even want to change out your toothbrush more often than that recommendation! After all, your putting your toothbrush right in your mouth…and you are still brushing your teeth when you don’t feel great. It’s an easy step to take to stay healthy!
  • Sharing toothbrushes has been shown to also share illness and germs. That’s not too surprising! But what is surprising is that so many of us put our toothbrushes right next to another toothbrush (such as in a toothbrush holder). Because of this, you can, in theory, be exposing yourself to even more germs. Long story short: if you store your toothbrush close to someone else’s toothbrush, it’s all the more reason to regularly change out both of your brushes!

blog post hagen dental practice in cincicnnati ohiCleaning Your Current Toothbrush: The Takeaways

Although it’s not guaranteed to work or to kill off all germs, you can also clean your toothbrush itself. Some people will:

  • Use a UV toothbrush sanitizer. Now…is that the easiest route? Probably not, but it’s a choice!
  • Soak your toothbrush in antibacterial mouthwash. Before you use it again, you’ll want to rinse it off. Ask us for more details, but just know that this does not guarantee you will kill off all germs.
  • Run your toothbrush through extremely hot water for 3 minutes. The water needs to be hot enough to kill germs, so be careful that you don’t burn yourself! (Hey, if you really don’t want to buy a new brush, it’s worth a try!)

Not Even Sure Which Toothbrush Type Is Right For You?

So…you are ready to buy a new toothbrush to replace your old one?!

When it comes to a manual toothbrush versus electric, lots of people have a personal preference for one or the other, and that’s okay!

If you are thinking you might want to try or switch to an electric toothbrush, consider the Sonicare toothbrush, one that we recommend and that you can purchase from us.

With this toothbrush, you are able to improve how you clean beyond the “reach” of each of the bristles.

Thanks to its oscillating power brush, the bristles create a motion that better allows the toothbrush to get into those hard-to-reach places throughout your mouth. You can think of the technology powering the Sonicare toothbrush in two ways: First, you have a scrubbing action that keeps the surface area of your teeth as bacteria free as possible.

dentistry hagen dds blog cincinnati ohio dentist(This is the same as your manual brush.) But then there’s the second component—how the bristles are vibrating. That cleans in a way that your traditional, manual brush cannot. Imagine this: the Sonicare brush head vibrates more than 30,000 brush strokes per minute you brush! That’s more than a manual brush delivers in a month of brushing, just to compare.

A Recap On What You’ve Learned

So, to recap, it’s best to change out whatever kind of toothbrush head you have every 3-4 months. A few more tips: Don’t share your toothbrush and thoroughly rinse your toothbrush after each use. You also want to avoid covering your toothbrush regularly, which traps in germs, and it can create a moist environment where microorganisms thrive.
Have any more questions? We’d love to answer them! Keep up with your consistent professional cleanings and dental exams to ensure we can catch issues early and do our part to keep your teeth, gums, and mouth! Give us a call to schedule your next appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Source:

  1. http://www.ada.org/en/about-the-ada/ada-positions-policies-and-statements/statement-on-toothbrush-care-cleaning-storage-and-

What Your Tongue Says About Your Health (INFOGRAPHIC)

Friday, January 5th, 2018

Hagen-Infographic-What Your Tongue Says About Your Health

See the PDF version of the “Your Tongue Can Indicate Your State of Health” infographic here.

4 Things to Know About Acid Reflux

Monday, November 20th, 2017

what is acid reflux hagen

Acid reflux: it’s when small amounts of our stomach acid travel into the esophagus or even our mouth.

Symptoms of acid reflux include heartburn which is best described as a burning pain and discomfort in your throat area, chest area or around your abdomen. Other symptoms include a sour or bitter taste in your throat (also called regurgitation).

Other symptoms people experience include bloating, a feeling that food is stuck in your throat, burping, black stools, dry cough, sore throat, hoarseness for no reason, and more.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as GERD, is a more serious form of reflux. Although a medical professional can diagnose you either way, GERD includes more persistent heartburn. It is heartburn that is sometimes also accompanied by coughing, wheezing, chest pain and possibly regurgitation. Sometimes the symptoms get worse at night.

Here are 4 more things to know about acid reflux.

#1: Acid reflux can have a negative effect on your teeth.

Both acid reflux and GERD can put you or your child at greater risk for tooth erosion and periodontal issues.

That’s because the acid can damage the enamel—as well as the dentin. Just like acid from foods can, over time, damage your teeth, so can acid that comes from your own body. Stomach acid can also irritate the esophagus.

#2. But you can do something if you have acid reflux!

First, follow your doctor’s advice to reduce symptoms and to get to the cause of your issue. This may include avoiding trigger such as spicy foods, tomato, citrus fruits, raw onions, alcohol and coffee, just to name a few (3).

Next, be sure to let us know! We can help you come up with a plan to combat the acid that may be coming in contact with your teeth.

Even our little ones can get acid reflux! If your child has acid reflux, let us know, including any changes in their medication related to acid reflux. It may even require an additional visit or two to the dentist so that their teeth can be properly watched.

Since kids don’t always know what is “normal” in terms of acid reflux, or not having acid reflux, they might not be able to report that they are having it. Or they can simply be too young to tell you! If you spot any signs, be sure to ask them or take them to their doctor.

A general rule of thumb if your child has a history of acid reflux: be sure to take extra special care of their teeth! After all, a recent student found that kids with reflux are about six times more likely to experience damage to their enamel compared with kids who do not have acid reflux (1, 2, 3). That’s where fluoride and prescription toothpaste can help.

Don’t forget: we can help spot signs and symptoms of acid reflux (and tooth erosion) in your mouth.

#3. Look at your diet if you have symptoms of acid reflux.

Can dietary changes help ease or get rid of the symptoms? In some cases, yes! A first step can be to eliminate sugar from your diet. Then reduce how much soda you drink and cut back on fruit or other acidic drinks. n some cases, if you drink something acidic, you can benefit from rinsing out your mouth after. Another tip: stay hydrated with water, since water (and your saliva) supports the natural way of getting rid of enamel-eating acids.

Other lifestyle factors that can contribute to, or worsen, acid reflux include:

Smoking (just one more reason to quit!)

  • Size of meals
  • Posture and way of sleeping
  • Certain clothes (if they are super tight around the waist)
  • Being overweight
  • Certain medications (1, 2, 3) 

fighting acid reflux hagen dental practice

 

#4. Foods can also ease acid reflux, in some cases.

It’s true that so many foods can worse, or create, acid reflux issues or symptoms. But, your diet can also help take away the discomfort, too.

Foods that can sometimes ease acid reflux include:

  • Green vegetables
  • Many lean meats
  • Oatmeal
  • Non-citrous fruits like melons or bananas (1, 2, 3)

Dental Health For Your Whole Family

Talk to us if you believe you or a child has symptoms of acid reflux. Regular checkups with Dr. Hagen are crucial to maintaining a healthy mouth! Have questions or need to schedule your next appointment? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

References

  1. http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/gastrointestinal-disorders/article/acid-reflux-a-dental-disaster-in-the-making-1013
  2. https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2017/foods-help-acid-reflux-fd.html
  3. http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/gastrointestinal-disorders/article/ada-12-acid-reflux-and-dental-health

Do You Know the Top 5 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer?

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

what to know oral cancer

Oral cancer: it’s a serious subject, and for good reason!

Cancer, as you may or may not know, is when cells in our body begin to grow in a way that is out of control. Really, any cell in our body can become cancerous.

So what about cancer of the mouth or “oral cancer”? (more…)

10 Must-Know Facts About Dental Hygienists

Sunday, August 20th, 2017

Part of the smiling team you’ll always see at Hagen Dental is our Dental Hygienists!

Curious about what dental hygienists do?

During the past 100 years, the dental hygiene profession has drastically evolved.

Starting back in 1906, the position originally only consisted of providing thorough dental cleanings. Now, in addition to administering preventative care, dental hygienists are also responsible for much more (1). Let’s take a closer look…

10 must know facts

They’re Different from Dental Assistants

Sometimes mistaken for the same profession, there is a difference between dental hygienists and dental assistants, although many people do use the wording a bit interchangeably. Dental assistants typically work as a direct aide to a dentist, while dental hygienists provide one-on-one care to patients, generally speaking!

They Do More Than “Just” Clean Your Teeth

In addition to scrubbing your pearly whites, they also perform more advanced tasks. Initially, many of these tasks were only done by dentists. Dental hygienists perform patient history reviews, vital checks, risk assessments, periodontal examinations, and much more!

They Are Very Well Educated

Becoming a dental hygienist isn’t necessarily easy (but of course we’d like to think it’s worth the time it takes!)

To enroll in a dental hygiene program, a student must have already taken human anatomy, sociology, chemistry, and sociology (not the easiest courses, huh?) Dental hygiene programs can vary in length, depending on the institution. Most range from 2-4 years. After schooling, they must take a standardized exam and acquire state licensure in order to perform patient care!

The Job Outlook is Positive

Did you know?! From 2014-2024, the job outlook for dental hygienists is calculated to grow 19 percent, which is much faster than the average job outlook. Demand for preventative care by hygienists will grow as research continues to uncover the strong correlation between oral and overall health. We like to think it’s because more and more people are interested in helping people with their oral and overall health!

did you know dental hygienists

They’re Absolutely Essential In Our Dental Office

Dental hygienists perform much of the “behind-the-scenes” tasks, but they definitely receive much praise in our office for helping so much—and for making patients feel comfortable and at home!

Even though you don’t always see it firsthand, the team members in a dental office work diligently together to provide you with excellent oral care.

Without hygienists taking on roles involving the business side of a dental office (attending meetings, maintaining equipment, updating health histories, and much more!) it wouldn’t run quite as smooth. Essentially, think of Dental Hygienists as helping take care of you, the patients, and helping to keep all the detail you don’t see running smoothly—all with a smile of course.

…But They Don’t Just Work in Dental Offices

Did you know that dental hygienists aren’t only needed in dental offices? They also work in hospitals, nursing homes, community clinics, and schools—so it’s not just the people you see when you go to visit the Dentist.

And, in some cases, they might not always be working directly with teeth. Some dental hygienists find work as researchers, administrators, entrepreneurs, or educators (3, 4).

They Are Not All ‘9-5’ers

You might think that dental hygiene is always a full-time profession, but that’s not always true either. In fact, plenty of dental hygienists work within a flexible schedule. Weekend, evening, and part-time schedules aren’t out of the ordinary. That’s another reason so many find it as an attractive career option.

They Are Your First Aide in Early Detection

Dental hygienists are your first line of defense in preventing and identifying oral health issues. Examining your mouth and jaw area by feeling for abnormalities and taking X-rays, they can help detect oral cancer, periodontal disease, TMJ, and more (6). (Clearly, they deserve our appreciation!)

They Rank High on Career Satisfaction

“Do what you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” Fortunately for the majority of dental hygienists, they actually feel this way. More specifically, about 84 percent of folks in this profession are satisfied with their career and feel that they made the right choice in becoming a dental hygienist.

With nearly half of Americans feeling unsatisfied with their jobs, this is a promising statistic for those considering dental hygiene as a profession! (8, 9)

Not Only Will They Take Care of Your Teeth, But They’ll Teach You How to Take Care of Your Teeth

Sure, dental hygienists will help to give you a thorough teeth cleaning and examination while you’re at your check-up…but, most of the time, it’s you who’s taking care of your teeth!

After helping to give your mouth a deep clean, they’ll be able to suggest at-home maintenance tips specific to your needs. For example, if you’re experiencing bleeding gums, they’ll suggest a distinct regimen using specific products in order to minimize the bleeding! (And, of course, Dr. Hagen will want to speak to you about any issues you’re having as well.)

Come Meet Our Dental Hygienists

Want to meet some of the best dental hygienists around that are sure to make you feel comfortable and at ease? Give Hagen Dental Practice a visit! We want the best for your oral health, so don’t be afraid to pick up the phone and schedule your next appointment.

Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit today.

Sources:

  1. http://www.rdhmag.com/articles/print/volume-30/issue-1/feature/our-remarkable-role.html
  2. https://www.concorde.edu/blog/dental-assistant-vs-dental-hygienist
  3. http://www.allalliedhealthschools.com/dental-assisting/how-to-become-dental-hygienist/
  4. https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/dental-hygienists-surprising-facts
  5. https://www.wku.edu/dentalhygiene/facts_dentalhygiene.php
  6. http://www.firstchoicedental.com/blog/your-dental-hygiene-visit-more-cleaning
  7. https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-hygienists.htm
  8. http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2015/02/career-satisfaction-dental-hygienists-are-satisfied-yet-still-daydream.html
  9. http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/10/06/3-how-americans-view-their-jobs/

10 More Hagen Dental Practice Testimonials

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

patient testimonials

We’re proud of our patients’ satisfaction, and we love hearing about their experiences with us! Here are some of our top patient reactions we’d like to share with you.

1. “Goes That Extra Mile”

hagen dental testimonial“This is one of those rare places where EVERY person you come in contact with is friendly, knowledgeable and goes that extra mile to make make you feel welcome.” –Darren

2. “Up-to-date Technology”

“Incredible staff of friendly and knowledgeable people. Up-to-date technology. All questions answered. Immaculate.” –Jerry

3. “Professional, Caring People”

“I have been a patient over 25 years. Dr. Hagen and all his staff are always professional, caring people. They help me take good care of my teeth. Visits to the dentist are a pleasure. They keep up with the latest in dental care. I don’t live in the area and drive across town to continue to be a patient.” –Regina

4. “Exemplary”

“Dr. Hagen and all the hygienists that work here are exemplary and the most professional dental folks I have ever worked with. I’ve been coming for years and they got me together for my wedding photos back in 2011. The reception folks are courteous and respectful.

The waiting area always smells good and has contemporary magazines, with modern furniture and they ALWAYS have fresh flowers! A great detail! The equipment is clean and everyone does a great job.” –Michael

5. “Great With Kids”

“Very friendly staff. They are also great with kids. [I have] been coming to Dr. Hagen for almost 10 years. Highly recommended.” –Wanda

6. “When I Come Here, I Feel Like a Celebrity”

“When I come here I feel like a celebrity, important. I always brag about the entire staff. Definitely satisfied.”–Ken

7. “I Couldn’t Be Happier”

hagen patient experiences“I couldn’t be happier with Dr. Hagen and the wonderful staff at Hagen Dental Practice. I lost my front tooth at 24 years old and everyone gave the best care to remedy the situation.” –Dani

8.“Best Dental Care I’ve Ever Had”

“Hagen Dental has given me the best dental care I’ve ever had. I’m just sorry I didn’t discover them sooner!” –Barb

9. “It Makes Going to the Dentist a Pleasure”

“Dr. Hagen and his staff are truly amazing! They are always so friendly; it makes going to the dentist a pleasure.” –Christina

10.“Identified My Gum Recession Early”

“I’ve been a patient of HDP since 2002 and always leave my visits healthier than when I arrived. They also identified my gum recession early in my time as a patient and have helped me stave off further recession. Viva HDP!” –Dan

Obtain the Smile of Your Dreams at Hagen Dental

Need a new dentist? Or are you ready to start going to the dentist regularly again? Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit us at hagendds.com.