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Posts Tagged ‘hagen dental dds’

Hagen Dental Practice: Featured Services

Thursday, June 14th, 2018

Take a look at a few of featured services below.

hagen dental featured services

You can view the PDF version of this infographic here.

Can Gum Recession Happen In An Otherwise Healthy Mouth?

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

The short answer is that yes, gum recession can happen in a mouth that is otherwise ”healthy.”

Gum recession is the process during which the margin of gum tissue surrounding the teeth wears away or pulls back. This process causes exposure of more of the tooth’s surface, or even the tooth’s root.

Gaps can form between the teeth and gum line, creating an easy place for bacteria to build up. If left untreated, the teeth can become severely damaged, cause extreme discomfort, and even lead to tooth loss.

How Does it Happen?

Gum recession usually happens gradually. Signs include tooth sensitivity or noticing a tooth that seems to have “gotten longer”. There can also be a noticeable notch where the tooth meets the gum. It’s important NOT to ignore these signs. Prevention (when possible) and early treatment are the keys to repairing the gum and tooth and prevent further damage.

what-causes-gum-recession

What Causes Gum Recession?

Part of the reason that gum recession can happen, even if you have good oral health habits, comes down to how it happens. Here are a few scenarios that can lead to recession:

Insufficient Dental Care: Skipping or slacking on your regular dental hygiene habits makes it much easier for plague to turn into tartar. This hard substance builds on and between your teeth, and can only be removed at a professional dental cleaning. Tartar increases the likelihood of gum recession. So keep up your daily habits like regular brushing, flossing and rinsing with antibacterial mouthwash to keep tartar buildup to a minimum.

Periodontal Disease: Bacterial infections can destroy gum tissue and the supporting boney tissue that hold the teeth in place. Regular checkups, healthy dietary choices, and proper oral hygiene routines are paramount to preventing gum infection.

many-factors-that-can-cause-gum-recession

Remember this: even if you have an otherwise healthy mouth, and stay regular with your oral hygiene, there are many other factors that can cause your gums to start receding:

Genetics: Some people are more susceptible to gum disease. Some people have thinner or weaker gum tissue to start with. Others have larger, more prominent roots. Some studies show that approximately 30% of the population are predisposed to gum recession, regardless of how well they care for their teeth (1,2).

Brushing Too Hard: Aggressive tooth brushing creates a high risk for gum recession. This includes several components: Trauma to the gum tissue associated with brushing too hard, using too hard a toothbrush, or cross friction as you brush sideways across the gums. These factors can cause the enamel on the teeth to wear away, and irritate the gums, causing them to recede. The safest way to brush is gently, with a soft-bristled brush, in an up and down motion (1,2). Remember how we’ve talked about the benefits of flossing and using an electric toothbrush? It’s all making sense now since we don’t typically brush as hard when using an electric toothbrush.

Hormonal Changes: Women are more susceptible to gum recession related to hormone fluctuations. Across the course of a woman’s life, changes that accompany puberty, pregnancy and menopause can make gums more sensitive and vulnerable to gum recession.

Tobacco Products: Tobacco users develop sticky plaques on their teeth, which also can lead to gum recession.

Grinding and Clenching: The added forces and pressure placed on the teeth that are associated with clenching and grinding of the jaw serve to irritate the gums at their attachment site on the bone, causing the gum tissue to recede from the base of the tooth. A custom-made mouth guard can be helpful for night bruxism. (Ask us for more information specific to you.)

Crooked Teeth and Misaligned Bite: If teeth don’t come together evenly, increased and imbalanced forces are placed upon the gums and bones, increasing the probability that the gums will recede (1, 2). Invisalign is a great alternative to braces to help straighten issues with crooked teeth or bite.

Lip or Tongue Piercings: Jewelry in or around the oral cavity can cause repetitive irritation or rubbing of the gums, leading to wearing away of the affected gum tissue.

Trauma to the Gum Tissue: Traumatic injury to the teeth or gums from events such as accidents, fights, sports injuries or falls can lead to gum recession.

Call Hagen Dental Practice Today for all Your Oral Health Needs

Do you have questions about the prevention or treatment of gum recession? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have regarding your gums or your dental health! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/receding_gums_causes-treatments#1
  2. http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/problems/gums-receding.htm
  3. http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/gum-disease/article/receding-gums-and-treatment-and-causes-0214

What to Know About Oral Cancer, Eating Disorders & Decalcification

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

eating disorders and oral health

More than 10 million Americans are affected by serious eating disorders. These disorders can have serious ramifications for your overall health, as well as your oral health!2

A Serious Subject: Eating Disorders & Your Health

Two of the most common eating disorders are bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa. Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by repeated, excessive eating, followed by self-induced vomiting, also known as purging. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by an extreme fear of gaining weight, a desire to be thin, self-induced starvation, and the inability to maintain a normal weight.

Both conditions deprive the body of crucial vitamins, minerals, proteins and other nutrients required to maintain good health, including oral health. These deficiencies can lead to decalcification of the teeth.3

Decalcification is an early form of tooth decay and damage that can lead to further injuries or breakdown of teeth, more serious tooth decay, and cavities.

Eating disorders can also cause bad breath, tenderness of the mouth and throat, as well as swelling in the salivary glands. These disorders can lead to dry mouth, cracked lips, sores in the mouth, bleeding gums, and sensitivity of the teeth.1,2

The self-induced vomiting that occurs with bulimia nervosa causes powerful digestive acids from the stomach (that normally aren’t found in the mouth) to come in contact with the teeth. This acid attacks and wears away at the tooth enamel, causing erosion. This frequent purging can also change the color, shape, or even length of the teeth!1

Those with anorexia nervosa can experience osteoporosis and severe malnutrition, leading to weakening of the bones. This includes weakening of the jaw bone as well as weakening of the teeth and enamel, or even tooth breakage or loss.1

Long-Term Negative Health Effects

Long term malnutrition from eating disorders can lead to increased susceptibility to infections and other negative health effects.

The repeated vomiting of bulimia can damage the lining of the esophagus because of the repeated contact with the strong stomach acid and the micro-traumas of the tissue associated with the purging. A very small percentage of bulimics can develop bulimia-related cancer due to the damage to the esophagus.4

What to Know About Oral Cancer

Concerned about oral cancer? Early warning signs include lumps or growths in the mouth, throat or neck, patchy areas or lesions in the tissues of the mouth, hoarseness or difficulty swallowing, unusual bleeding, or persistent sores that don’t heal. Recall that when you come in for your regular visit, we look for signs of cancer—after all, we’re trained to do so.

Prevention and regular dental checkups are key when it comes to proper oral health as well as preventing oral cancer! Additionally, a healthy, nourishing diet is important to give your mouth and teeth the building blocks it needs to stay healthy.

prevention at hagen dds practice in cincinnati

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

If you or someone you know suffers from an eating disorder, it is important that you seek professional help as soon as possible. Overcoming the eating disorder is the first step to healing the effects of the acid and nutrient deficiencies that come along with these conditions.

We can help you restore and work with some of the problems created from eating disorders (and that’s part of why we want to know about your health history, too.) Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

References/Sources:

  1. http://www.yourdentistryguide.com/eating-disorder/
  2. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/Teens/concerns
  3. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/decalcification
  4. http://www.bulimiahelp.org/articles/bulimia-and-cancer-what-you-need-know
  5. http://www.atooth.com/oral-cancer/

 

Your Child’s First Dental Visit: When Should It Be?

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

Did you know? While in previous years, we would have recommended children to have their first dental visit around age 3, we now advise parents to come visit us earlier than that age!

hagen dental dds

We now recommend bringing in your toddler at around 18 months. This is typically about the time when some, but not all, of their baby teeth are in!

Why The Change Now?

We like to see your children to make sure that everything in the mouth is normal! Most children’s baby teeth, also known as primary teeth or even milk teeth, come in with no problems, but sometimes lifestyle factors can affect the health of those teeth…

Let’s dig deeper!

More and more frequently in recent years, for a number of different reasons, the rate of tooth decay in young children is rapidly increasing.

In fact, in recent years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 42 percent of children, from age 2 to 11, have had cavities in their baby teeth. This high percentage of children with dental decay is much higher than in previous years.

family dentist in cincinnati

Why Is This Happening?

This rapid increase in early childhood caries – or ECC – is actually being called an “epidemic” because of just how prevalent it has now become. Early childhood caries (which in the past has also been called baby bottle tooth decay) can develop with infants or toddlers who go to sleep with a bottle in their mouth. Other children might get into the habit of walking around with a “sippy” cup or using a similar kind of cup, where they expose their teeth, for long periods of time, to sugary liquids or foods – such as sugary or starchy foods. That habit can also lead to decay, especially when it happens day after day.

hagen dental in cincinnatiAnother contributing factor is more widespread use of bottled water and the lack of fluoride. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay because it increases the rate of re-mineralization in the mouth and it slows down the breakdown of enamel in our children’s mouth as well.

Because many children are drinking more water without fluoride, they aren’t experiencing those same benefits.

As mentioned, historically, this kind of tooth decay was not present to the same degree, and therefore most dentists would recommend a child’s first dentist be around age 3. Now you can put a reminder on your calendar to be sure you come in and see us around 18 months!

Your Child’s First Visit to Dr. Hagen: Timing is Everything!

Before getting worried, remember that tooth decay is preventable and bringing in your child earlier to see us is also a key preventative measure you can take. Bringing your child into the dentist can make sure that children’s teeth are coming in as they should!

taking your child to the dentist cincinnati ohio

It’s also an opportunity to talk about any habits that the baby may have that could be contributing to tooth decay.

Clearly, a healthy mouth is something we all want for our kids. When we have a healthy mouth we promote the ability to chew properly, which in turn, impacts a child’s ability to maintain good nutrition. Healthy teeth from a young age also help encourage speech development, it ensures a space for permanent teeth, and it promotes confidence in the long-term.

Starting young helps promote a lifetime of healthy and bright smiles.

Be sure to bring your child in around 18 months so that we can examine their teeth and gums and help you know the proper oral hygiene methods and techniques for their oral health. Before then, be sure that you are giving your children nothing but water at bedtime so that you can avoid sugary liquids or carbohydrates being exposed to teeth all night long. 

Sources/References

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/03/02/cavities-children-teeth/5561911/

 

Gum Disease? Here’s What to Know About Scaling & Root Planing

Friday, May 27th, 2016

At any given time, we’re all developing some degree of plaque in our mouths. But when we brush, floss, and get regular dentist cleanings, we help to make sure it doesn’t become a problem.

So what is plaque?

Plaque is a biofilm, mostly made of bacteria, that adheres to the surface of our teeth. Plaque has an organized structure and its components – glycoproteins and polysaccharides – make it impossible to remove with water or by just using mouthwash.

In as little as a day, the biofilm that is in our mouth can transform from the soft and removable kind of plaque into a hard state – also called tartar – and that is much harder to remove.

The bacteria in dental plaque is what can lead to periodontal disease. (“Peri” means around, and “odontal” refers to our teeth.)

root planingOur bodies strive to get rid of the bacteria we have in our mouth, and therefore the cells of your immune system have an inflammatory reaction. This inflammatory reaction is how and why our gums then become swollen and can bleed. The more that nothing is done to fight off this bacteria, the more this can become a problem, and the more the bacteria will thrive.

And that’s where scaling & root planing come in…

Scalers are a tool that your dentist uses during – you guessed it – scaling and root planing. These are special tools that are used professionally in order to fight this bacteria build-up. The scaler can come in a couple of different sizes, but generally, it is a tool that is narrower at the tip. No matter what the tool looks like, they are simply specialized tools used to remove tartar and plaque.

scaling removes plaque

And what exactly does the scaling and root planing treatment involve?

The treatment works towards fighting periodontal disease – both on the teeth and the roots of your teeth. First, your teeth and gums are numbed so that all the plaque and tartar can be removed without any discomfort. Next, the professional tools are used to remove calculus. That may be by ultrasonic, sonic scaler, or power scaler.

After the bacteria is removed beneath the gum line, then teeth are smoothed and cleaned so that the gum tissue not only properly heals, but so it “reattaches” to your teeth. Part of the reason teeth can be smoothed is to get rid of surfaces and areas where bacteria are trapped or held – the same places where that bacteria would otherwise be much more likely to thrive. That’s also part of the treatment designed to get your gums back to their healthiest state.

Certain patients may have additional steps as part of their scaling and root planing treatment, depending on their vulnerability to gum disease and their medical history.

For example, there is ARESTIN®, which allows antibiotics to be slowly released over time in your mouth. Your dentist simply adds ARESTIN® to the your most vulnerable areas in the mouth – the pocket between your gum and tooth. This means that not only have you killed a great deal of bacteria during scaling and root planing, but you are now killing bacteria left behind after your procedure.

arestin hagen dental

Who benefits from scaling and root planing?

Your dentist will be able to recommend and tell you if you have periodontal disease, including any appropriate treatments – such as scaling and root planing – that can help you get back your healthy smile. Your dentist will not only take into account the current state of your teeth, but also your entire health history. Typically, if your dentist determines that you have gum disease that has progressed to a certain stage where bone loss is more likely to occur, he or she may recommend this kind of treatment.

Getting Your Teeth & Gums Feeling – and Looking – Healthy Again

Does your infection go away forever thanks to this treatment? The answer is that it is important to know that just because you have scaling and root planing, doesn’t meant you should go back to and bad oral health habits. Rather, the treatment is going to be maximized only if brushing, flossing and regular dentist visits (among other behaviors you want to avoid such as smoking) are kept up after your treatment. With that said, scaling and root planing does greatly support those looking to regain healthy-looking, firm gums.

In the end, the entire procedure can be done in an environment in which you are comfortable, and it can typically be done in a single visit. For some people, after the treatment, the mouth may be tender. In certain scenarios, the treatment can be broken into several visits when requested by a patient.

Want to learn more about scaling and root planing or ARESTIN®? Whether it is for a cosmetic consultation, scaling and root planing, or your regular visit, we’d love to see you. Read more about Dr. Hagen and the team, including our state-of-the-art dental methods and technologies, and give us a call today at (513) 251-5500.

keep up with oral habits hagen dental

Sources/References

Did You Know? 4 Facts About Hagen Dental Practice That Will Surprise You

Saturday, April 23rd, 2016

facts about hagen dental in cincinnati

You may think you know a lot about Hagen, but did you know these 4 things?

1. Hagen was the second dentist in Cincinnati to use the CEREC machine and terminology!

CEREC uses ceramic materials to restore any tooth that is decayed or broken, a procedure that can be done in just one-visit. What’s great is that it also preserves your tooth structure, and it lasts for a long, long, long time – if not forever.

But did you know that Dr. Hagen was one of the first to do this – in the region?

Assuming you are a candidate for a CEREC restoration, we examine a number of factors including the tooth itself, and the tissue around it. We then get an optical impression of the tooth. A reflective powder is applied to the tooth, and a picture is taken and viewed on our computer screen. That’s all done so we can make the perfect restoration!

Then we use our CEREC machine to create the restoration. After we have our 3-dimensional, virtual model of the tooth, Dr. Hagen designs the custom-fit restoration you’ll eventually have inside your mouth. That means that – as you might have guessed by now – we’ve been doing a form of 3D printing, right in our office, for years!

Next Dr. Hagen will bond the crown to the remaining tooth structure. This ceramic, tooth-colored restoration is not only cut out and shaped perfectly but we make sure you have a proper fit and a comfortable bite when it’s in your mouth. Not only has Dr. Hagen been doing one-visit CEREC crowns for years, but he was one of the first to even call it by that name.

CEREC technology _dentist offerings

2. Hagen Dental Practice has 202 combined years of experience across our staff.

If you’ve been to Hagen Dental Practice, you know we do everything we can to make sure you are as comfortable as possible. We keep you smiling – not just with our excellent treatment, but with the unusually friendly and caring manner with which care is provided.

But did you know that our team has 202+ combined years of experience? We want our team members to be both technically competent and personally warm, and we feel fortunate to have found such people! See the team on our website here.

serving patients for more than 200 years3. Hagen Dental Practice offers Snap-On Smile™.

Snap-On Smile™ brings you an affordable, pain-free, non-invasive cosmetic way to get a beautiful smile.

Looking to close a gap you have in your teeth? Or maybe you are looking to cover your existing crooked teeth? Another way that Hagen Dental Practice is leading the way is with the ability to get a smile makeover in our office. With Snap-On Smile™, there is no drilling or extractions necessary. Let’s explore further.

Once we know if you are a candidate, we talk aesthetics. Then, a pain-free impression of your teeth is made, and on your next visit with Hagen, you will have your new smile fitting!

The fitting is just what it sounds like: we make sure that your new smile fits just as it should, and you get to walk out with your beautiful smile! Your smile makeover can be just that easy and quick, and your fitting can last as long as 5 years. That’s right: Snap-On Smile™ requires no shots and no drilling! Ask us for more information if you’d like to learn more about this life-changing solution.

4. Hagen Dental Practice’s patients’ ages range from 3 to 100.

When you come in to Hagen Dental Practice, a hygienist professionally cleans your teeth, helping to keep your teeth free of cavities and your gums free of bacteria. In turn, this lessen the risk of serious health conditions.

On your own, regular brushing helps combat plaque and tartar build-up, but that’s also what we look to remove when you come in to see us. Regular cleanings keep serious problems from developing and they help you keep your natural teeth for a lifetime. Just ask any of our patients – which certainly range from brand new teeth to teeth that have lasted for decades!

Speaking of teeth that last for a lifetime, did you know that Hagen Dental Practice’s patients range from 3 to 100 years old?
We are proud to be able to offer services to children at their first visit and to 100 and beyond!

Your Family Will Love Our Friendly & Relaxed Office

No matter your age, we’d love to come see you! After all, you and your entire family deserve a healthy smile that can last a lifetime. If you are thinking about bringing the younger kids in, know that we can relieve fears in children of all ages and put them at ease for every visit. Whether it is for a cosmetic consultation or for your regular visit, we’d love to see you. Read more about Dr. Hagen and the team, including our state-of-the-art dental methods and technologies, and then give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your children.

 

Hoppin’ Facts About Bunny Teeth

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

hagen and easter

Easter often brings a combination of gift baskets, dyed Easter eggs, candy…and of course, the Easter Bunny!

Let’s take a quick look at the Easter bunny…and rabbits in general.

So what exactly does the Easter bunny have to do with Easter? It’s said that the tie-in with Easter is based some in myth, in particular, that a bunny is a symbol of both spring renewal and fertility. Springtime coincides with Easter each year, so that is part of where the tradition comes from.

The real source of the Easter – Easter bunny connection may be from German folklore in particular, with Ostara, the German goddess of springtime. It was said that the German’s “Oschter Haws” (or “Easter Hare”) laid a nest of colored eggs as gifts for the kids who were well behaved!

There’s a few other stories about the Easter Bunny and its origins, but let’s take another look at rabbits – and their teeth!

“Carrots are devine… You get a dozen for a dime, It’s maaaa-gic! – Bugs Bunny

Bugs Bunny, one of the most famous bunnies of all time, once said these words when giving praise to carrots.

But do rabbits really eat carrots?

The answer, is – well, yes! Rabbits are herbivores, so they don’t eat meat. Instead, they eat a combination of grass, clovers, wild flowers and farm crops, including carrots and other root vegetables, at least when they are in the wild.

To chew their food, they have 28 teeth – and, believe it or not – these teeth actually never stop growing. Other members of the rodent family also have this trait, also known as “teeth that are open-rooted” and it actually helps them thrive in the wild.

Why Do Rabbits’ Teeth Keep Growing?

The teeth themselves are somewhat similar to horse teeth – they have 4 large incisors (also known as front teeth) as well as the other, smaller teeth. Many people just think they have 4 large teeth, but the smaller teeth (also called peg teeth) are what help them grind their food into smaller pieces before swallowing.

Being that they are similar to horse teeth, rabbit teeth are designed to break down fibrous veggies. But what happens if a bunny is unable to get enough weed, twigs, grasses or forage in her diet?

If a wild rabbit isn’t able to get that fiber in her diet, she won’t wear down her teeth naturally, meaning the teeth will grow beyond the desirable length. If this happens, the visible section of the tooth will grow higher and meet the other tooth abnormally (instead of where it would properly be worn down). This can lead to abnormal wear for the rabbit, and the teeth can form sharp edges that can be harmful.

Just imagine if your teeth started to shape in a way where they had sharp points – you could imagine the accidental damage your tongue and cheeks could endure!

The same is true for rabbits if this happens, which is part of why they are prone to dental issues. Because rabbits in the wild aren’t always able to get the right kind of diet to wear down the teeth, this can happen more often than you’d think. In some cases, the rabbit’s teeth can become impacted and inflamed, and it can even lead to an infection in the bone.

If a rabbit is a household pet, they are also not always getting the extreme amount of fiber their teeth were designed to break down. In those cases, people can usually take their domesticated rabbits to a vet in order to cut down the teeth on a regular basis.

You Mean Bunny Teeth…Can Be Similar to Ours?

Even if your pet is getting enough fiber to keep their teeth worn down as they would naturally be in the wild, vets recommend taking your bunny in to see the doctor for regular check-ups about twice a year, unless they tell you otherwise.

Just like for us humans, these check-ups can ensure everything in the mouth – even what we can’t see – is as it should be. People may think their bunny is eating normally and isn’t showing signs of pain, but there could be an issue going on, and it’s better to catch it early than have any disease progress. In fact, did you know that rabbits are actually known for being able to hide their pain and illnesses well! Who knew! 

hagen dental dds blogWe Support Your Entire Health: Give Hagen Dental a Call Today

At Hagen Dental, we are here to partner with you so you can improve your total health. Have questions?We’d love to answer them! Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.kidsplayandcreate.com/fun-bunnyrabbit-facts-for-kids/
  2. http://www.mybunny.org/info/dental-care/
  3. http://www.thedailymeal.com/7-things-you-never-knew-about-easter-bunny/4714

 

 

Why Does My Dentist Need to Know If I Have Diabetes?

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

diabetes and your smile and oral health

When you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop problems in your mouth, and you also less equipped to heal after dental surgery.

And, according to the American Diabetes Association, the most common problem affecting gums and teeth for people with diabetes is gum disease.

Think of your dentist as someone who is an advocate for your total health and well-being.

If we don’t know you are living with diabetes, we aren’t knowledgeable about the state of your health, and we may not be able to be as proactive in contributing to your treatment strategy.

Because diabetes makes you prone to other mouth problems – not “just” gum disease – if we know your health status, we are able to ensure that you are taking all the steps to best manage your blood sugar. Additionally, there are medications that can result in drastic and impactful changes in the mouth.

For instance, certain medications can drastically reduce the amount of saliva you have in your mouth, which can greatly impact your ability to “naturally” cleanse your teeth. As a result, we can see a drastic, and immediate change in the amount of harmful bacteria (and plaque) in your mouth – if you were to do nothing to manage this change in the mouth. All of this can happen relatively quickly, but with greater communication around your medications, we can come up with a strategy and plan to encourage a healthy mouth.

All in all, when we know the medications you’re taking, we’re better equipped to give you recommendations that take your entire health into account.

medication and diabetes

Mouth Problems: What to Know

In an ideal situation, we have a plan, and we manage our blood sugar levels, stay on a healthy nutrition plan, and continue daily, good oral health habits. If we also see a dentist regularly we can prevent problems, but if a problem occurs, we can catch it early!

When we have poor blood sugar control, we see an increase in the risk for gum problems. Just like with other infections, gum disease can cause our blood sugar to rise. And then, as a result, diabetes can be harder to manage because you are less able to fight bacteria and even more susceptible to infections.

If Our Blood Sugar is Uncontrolled…

If our blood sugar becomes uncontrolled, we may experience dry mouth and bad breath. What’s worse is that we can end up with thrush, inflammation in our gums and infections in the mouth.

Warning signs that you have an oral infection include:

  • Swelling or pus around the teeth or gums – even if small
  • Pain in your mouth that doesn’t go away
  • Pain when chewing
  • Dark spots in your teeth
  • The appearance of holes in your teeth
  • White or red patches on your gum tissue or anywhere in the mouth

Call us if you have diabetes and any of the signs or symptoms listed above.

Keep Taking Care of Your Teeth

The Canadian Diabetes Association says that, “Because periodontal disease is an infection, bacteria produce toxins that affect the carbohydrate metabolism in individual cells. It is also thought that the host response to periodontal bacteria can increase insulin resistance and, therefore, blood glucose levels.” Said another way, there is evidence to suggest (although cause and effect is not quite determined) that there is a two-way link between the state of your mouth and your management of diabetes (1).

If anything, this assertion just reinforces the idea that we have to be proactive in taking care of our mouths. Step one? Telling your dentist this major lifestyle change – that way we can work together to reduce your risk of complications and prevent gum and mouth infections or gum disease.

keep your teeth healthy

We Support Your Entire Health: Give Hagen Dental a Call Today

We want you to help you manage your diabetes – in a way that is as comfortable as possible. We’re here to partner with you so you can improve your total health.

Have questions? We’d love to answer them. Hagen Dental is supportive no matter where you are on your health journey. Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/5-reasons-why-oral-care-matters/
  2. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/more-on-the-mouth.html
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/diabetes

How Bad Is It to Go to Sleep Without Brushing Your Teeth?

Monday, March 21st, 2016

hagen dentalTypically most of us eat dinner at night. Just like with any other meal or snack, when we eat, the bacteria in our mouth have an opportunity to thrive. Sound gross?

Well—it doesn’t end there!

These bacteria thrive off the food particles that enter out mouth, and they then create an acid as a byproduct of feasting on the food we just ate. That acid is what breaks down our tooth enamel. Eventually, this is what causes decay and cavities.

Let’s say that you brush and floss after eating a meal, including after dinner before you go to bed. When we brush the right way, you interrupt that process from happening: in just two to three minutes of brushing, followed by flossing, you help prevent that build-up of bacteria.

You also help encourage the turnover of microbes on your teeth when you brush. This in turn means you reduce the tartar and the plaque build-up in your mouth. Another benefit? Brushing before bed is also another habit that can signal to our body that it’s time to get ready, unwind and go to bed!

If Fresh Breath & A Beautiful Smile Isn’t Enough to Motivate You…

So how bad is it if you don’t brush your teeth before going to sleep?

oral bacteria healthIf you don’t brush after a meal, and then head to bed, you contribute to a less healthy oral environment. Specifically, you are letting a lot of bacteria grow without interruption! You are also letting the plaque “sit” and harden on your teeth.

Over time, we get plaque on our teeth, and when it’s calcified (hardened) that makes it extremely difficult to remove and get rid of. Being that we have less saliva in our mouths at night, which helps naturally “swift away” food particles and bacteria, this can further accelerate the growth of bacteria.

From there, the plaque can continue to build-up in our mouth, resulting in a greater number of bacteria communities that may be thriving and doing harm to our oral health. Just imagine: bacteria in our mouth are always attempting to grow. All our daily habits can either work against this process—and work to reduce the bacteria that is present—or they can support the growth of the bacteria.

The good news it that this is part of why you regularly see us: we have the instruments and tools to remove your plaque build-up during your regular teeth cleaning. With that said, just think of how long that plaque can sit and get worse on your teeth in-between visits! 

But That’s Not All…

This plaque build-up is bad for your gum and teeth, but it can also signal to the body that you have an infection. This kind of inflammatory response that can come before or during the stages of gum disease keeps our immune system fighting off what it believes is something that is threating our body. In this process, our body is “attacking” our gum, hoping to protect our tissue.

This inflammatory response can result in our tissue being damaged or destroyed. When people see their gum line pulling away from the tooth, for example, this is often what has taken place.

Gum disease, inflammation and the repercussions of inflammation in our body is not something that would happen after just one night in which we fall asleep without brushing our teeth. But just like all our oral health habits, it comes down to the kind of habits we adopt over time.

teeth brushing

Fight an Elevated Oral Bacteria Count & Keep Your Smile Healthy

As you get ready for bed this week, put a priority on making sure you brush and floss. If you’re someone who often gets tired quickly, and then you end up accidentally falling asleep before brushing your teeth, change your habits so that you brush your teeth closer to finishing dinner. Your future, healthy mouth will thank you!

As little as three minutes can keep your teeth and gums healthy for the long run. It can help reduce future pain that could be associated with sensitive gum lines or cavities, and it can keep your smiling looking great. Help fight bad breath and help combat other diseases by taking time out to brush your teeth and floss before heading off to bed tonight.

Want to Setup an Appointment with Hagen Dental?
 

First, don’t forget to make brushing and flossing a part of your daily routine. If you are looking for a deep clean to get rid of the plaque build-up in your mouth, give Hagen a call today at 513.251.5500. Your teeth will feel great when you leave Hagen Dental. We have many options to help you achieve the smile of your dreams and we can’t wait to meet you.

Spring Break: What to Know About Your Teeth When You Travel

Saturday, March 5th, 2016

If you have any upcoming out-of-the-country trips planned, consider doing some research about medical care while on your trip.

That’s because, although it’s unlikely to happen, dental emergencies can happen when we travel.

Because dental emergencies happen, it’s best to be prepared no matter where we are, and that includes while on vacation!

What Classifies as a Dental Emergency?

A dental emergency is anything that requires immediate attention. If you’ve had a tooth knocked out, a loose tooth, a tooth that is suddenly out of alignment, a soft tissue wound or injury, or abnormal bleeding, these are typically situations that require urgent attention.

Of course any kind of severe and abnormal pain around the mouth can also be an emergency, and in many cases, a chipped or fractured tooth will also warrant an urgent trip to come see us. When your local, that’s when you would use our after-hours contact information to get ahold of us.

emergency dentist hagen dental dds

When traveling or going out of the country in particular, that’s where being prepared is essential.

With any dental emergency, whatever has gone wrong could get worse (or will get worse), if you wait to take care of it. Don’t think your “tough” just because you aren’t looking to set up an emergency visit if something happens to your mouth! After all, infections can spread, issues are likely to get worse without medical attention, more lasting damage can occur, and the costs associated could increase if you wait to see a dentist.

Here’s a list of situations when it’s best to get urgent attention:

  • Puncture wounds or lacerations to the cheeks, tongue or lips
  • Bleeding in the mouth
  • Severe and unusual pain
  • Large bulges on the gum tissue
  • Foreign object stuck in teeth or gums (potential emergency)
  • Sudden swelling in the mouth or gums
  • Loose teeth
  • Knocked out teeth, loose and/or misaligned teeth and fractured teeth

dental health on vacation and going abroad

Accidents Happen

In an ideal scenario you can come in to Hagen Dental for your regular visit before any long trips or extended time out of town or abroad. If you already have any issues such as gum disease, this is especially important.

While on your trip, avoid activities where you use your teeth like tools (e.g. using your teeth to cut tape or opening a bag in general using your teeth like scissors) and avoid things you already do such as chewing ice. Be cautious before taking any medication if you have a dental emergency because certain medications can thin your blood and increase bleeding. 

If you are going to be traveling for quite some time (or even if just for a “short” trip), it is a good idea to prepare for any medical emergency ahead of time. If you need in help in looking up information before you leave, let us know. We want to be sure your family is safe and has good access to dental care no matter where you are.