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4 Things You Didn’t Know About Hagen Dental Practice

Sunday, February 21st, 2016

Think you know everything about Hagen Dental?

Think again! Here are 4 things you might not have known about Hagen Dental Practice.

1. Dr. Hagen Can Help You Sleep better!

Did you know that a custom-fit, oral appliance could greatly improve snoring and obstructive sleep apnea?

It may be you – or even your spouse or child – who suffers from snoring, sleep apnea, or a combination of both, as many people do. As recommended by The American Academy of Sleep Medicine, these custom oral devices are a treatment that can greatly improve the quality of our sleep, and our life!

Improve your sleep and gain back all the benefits that come with greater quality of sleep by coming in to see us to see if you are a candidate for this treatment.

We first diagnose and assess the severity of your sleep apnea. After we take a look at your symptoms as well as risk factors, we can construct the appropriate sleep appliance that is best fit for you.

Keep in mind this is a non-invasive way to improve your lifestyle: it is easy to wear, easy to take care of, it is quiet, you can wear it anywhere, it is convenient and it is affordable! We see that as much as 90 percent of those who use the sleep appliance have successful improvement in the problems associated with sleep apnea.

Rest easy: not only can we help you have a beautiful smile, but we can help you feel like a whole new person thanks to improved quality of sleep!

hagen dental practice sleep apnea

2. Our Goal is All About your Entire Health & Well-Being—which is Why We Value Earning Your Trust.

At Hagen Dental Practice, our first goal, from the moment you walk in the door, is to earn a feeling of trust.

We know it is critical to have trust with so that you can feel great about the decisions you make regarding your health. We believe the absolute best dentistry we can provide takes place when we have that trust. We’re all working together toward the common goals of healthy teeth and gums and a beautiful smile.

Certain people have apprehension or worries about visiting the dentist, and the most important thing we can do first is to listen to our patients. Our environment is always comforting and our patients know they come to Hagen Dental and be treated with compassion and understanding.

hagen dental practice in cincinnati ohio

3. Hagen Dental Offers Pain-Free Smile Makeovers.

You may know how we have the latest and greatest when it comes to dentistry—whether it is children’s, cosmetic, family, general, implant, preventive, restorative and sedation dentistry….we take pride in being able to offer you technology, experience, and expertise!

We find that many people want to greatly enhance or improve their smile, but also they want to have a natural look. For those looking for a “smile makeover,” Hagen Dental is your premier destination to do just that…and it can be a pain-free process.

Our goal is that you have confidence when you smile, meet new people, or just when you go to eat—and with our pain-free smile makeovers, this is possible.

That’s why we offer the Snap-On Smile™, which is a removable, cosmetic dental appliance that has been custom-made for your smile. We also work to make sure it fits with your overall facial structure. Snap-On Smile™ is a strong, thin material (specifically, hi-tech dental resin) and it fits directly over your existing teeth.

With Snap-On Smile™, you can get a new, natural-looking smile with no drills, no cutting down of your current teeth, no glue or adhesives, no needles, and if you want to remove it, you can at any time. We’ve used it with people who have dental fears, those who don’t want veneers or want to try these before veneers, and for people with discoloration, stains, gaps in their teeth, and/or missing teeth. Ask us for more information if you’d like to learn more.

4. We Promote (and Live) a Healthy Lifestyle.

Part of total health is going to your dentist regularly and having good daily oral health habits, but part of it is also eating nutritious foods that make us feel great. We approach “total health” as lifestyle decisions or habits that promote our quality of life—behaviors and decisions that set us up for longevity! Another part of this idea of total health is getting enough sleep, and part of total health is of course getting physical activity.

At Hagen Dental, we encourage physical training of some kind, given that it can help us control weight, keeps us in shape, combats disease, boosts energy, promotes sleep, and it can also improve our confidence and sense of well-being.

The Hagen family is often in-training and regularly exercises: in fact, Dr. Hagen is a regular cyclist, and Jenny is an avid runner! Did you know that Dr. Hagen has been riding for more than 25 years and has done the Sunflower Ride 5 times? When Dr. Hagen is on his bike, Jenny can be found running: she has run 5 marathons, and is training for number 6!

On top of this, the office assistant, dental hygienists, dental coordinators and dental assistants on the Hagen Dental team like to run, lift weights, do yoga, and even pure barre—which, in many situations, means waking up at or around 4:30 or 5 AM to get in their workouts!

At the end of the day, the Hagen Dental team knows—just like you likely recognize—that keeping up with our healthy habits takes preparation, sacrifice, diligence and what you could call dedication. But, with all of those things, it is definitely worth it when crossing that finish line!

hagen dental dds

We Can’t Wait to Meet You

Have questions or want to set up your first appointment with Hagen Dental? No matter where you are on your health journey, we can’t wait to meet and support you! Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family. The entire Hagen Dental team can’t wait to meet you.

Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy: Part Two

Saturday, February 13th, 2016

choosing your childs dentist

Last week we talked about how February is National Children’s Dental Health Month. It’s important to take time with our kids to show them the importance of dental health.

After all, the mouth is the gateway to the body—meaning that the mouth greatly affects our total health, and that when we have a healthy mouth we often have a healthy body.

During Childhood: What We Can Do

Last week we talked about just how important it is to start taking your child to Dr. Hagen at around age 3. Besides taking our children to our dentist around that age (unless we were to tell you otherwise), there are other norms of tooth development during childhood.

First, kids will experience teeth that wiggle. Typically around age 6, kids will find that their teeth will begin to come loose. Generally speaking a good idea is to let the tooth come out naturally or with a bit of wiggling to help it come out with very little pain.
Cavities are also something to consider during this time. Again, in many cases due to high sugar in the diet, cavities can develop in our children’s teeth. There are steps we can take to make sure that kids reduce the likelihood of cavities, but also are educated on good oral health.

These steps include:

  1. Brushing for two minutes a day—at least. Take your time during this process and be sure that kids are brushing gently. In an ideal scenario, we might spend time brushing after every meal. Aim for two times per day, at minimum. Be sure to involve your children in the process and get creative to make it fun! Kids will enjoy it more if you are having fun, too. Verbalize how good of a job they are doing, why they are brushing their teeth, and even consider brushing your teeth as a family if that helps promote good oral health habits for all.
  1. Take a look at nutrition. Educate kids on how eating healthy can be delicious and can make them feel great! Emphasize the importance of instilling good dental hygiene habits at an early age. Since kids are often on the go, encourage healthy snacking from a young age if possible. This may mean planning ahead in order to avoid the more convenient, lower nutrient-dense (and sugar-heavy) snacks. Aim to avoid sugar-added drinks entirely if it’s possible, or keep them at a minimum since you know the damage they can do to teeth and overall health.dr hagen childrens dentist

When should kids start brushing their teeth by themselves?

It’s a good question, and every child is different—just like they are when it comes to tying their shoes. If we teach by example, many children can quickly pick up the habit and enjoy doing this on their own. Others are slower and less likely to pick up the habit on their own. Try to promote brushing their teeth as something fun and positive in your household to combat this notion.

On average, many kids have the ability to start brushing their teeth by themselves at age 4 or 5. It is at this age where they have the dexterity to be able to do so. If you notice your child is not taking enough time as they brush their teeth, consider some kind of timer to help them reach a goal.

When your child is around 7 or 8, they no longer need the baby toothbrush. At this point, they should be able to fully brush their teeth by themselves. A talking point used with many children is to discuss how although baby teeth fall out, they are important because they help “set up” our adult teeth. In other words, they set the stage for our adult teeth to come in.

“These Teeth Are For Life”

Communicate with your children that unlike the other bones in their body, our teeth do not “self-repair” in the same way. Although our gums do have the ability to “self-repair,” it is important for children to see why they need to take care of their teeth—even if they don’t have all their adult teeth in yet. Once they do have their adult teeth in, they should be aware that these are for life!

Another “norm” in our culture that can’t be forgotten is the Tooth Fairy! Technically, by the time our children have a full set of adult teeth, they will have lost 20 baby teeth…that’s a lot of teeth for the Tooth Fairy

Acting as the tooth fairy, many times parents give children around $1 for each tooth—or at least, when kids remember to leave it for the fairy! If your family is interested in the tradition, you can use the Tooth Fairy as a way to encourage good dental habits. Again, it’s just one more way you can promote education as well as good brushing habits.

Have questions about your child’s specific dental health? Or are you ready to bring your child in for their first visit to the dentist? Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here.

Sources

3 Truths About Smoking & Your Health

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

dentist in cincinnati hagen dentalIt’s probably not surprising to hear that people who smoke regularly encounter quite a few negative side effects when it comes to their health.

Not only is your total health affected, but your oral health is also negatively impacted. Here are 3 ways your oral health is impacted when you smoke.

1. Smoking makes your teeth stained and yellow.

Many of us take pride in having that bright and dazzling smile to put on display. Our smile is—after all—what people notice first about us!

It’s not just vanity, though, depending on how you look at it: having a smile we are proud of actually gives us more confidence in social settings. When you smoke it makes it quite a bit harder to have a white, or a healthy-looking smile: specifically, smoking is one of the top ways to stain your teeth. Over time, it is not uncommon for people who regularly smoke to not just have stained teeth, but teeth that are quite yellow!

2. Smoking makes you more susceptible and likely to have gum disease.

Did you know if you smoke, your gums aren’t functioning as they normally would?

When you smoke, the bone and soft tissue in your mouth is impacted. What’s more is that blood flow to the gums can be significantly reduced. Smoking keeps your gum tissue cells from acting as they normally when it comes to our natural way of healing and repairing. That’s part of the reason why people who smoke are actually more prone to getting infections and gum disease.

People ask: are cigars or smoking from a pipe habits that are just as bad for our health?

The answer is that, yes, just like cigarettes, the smoke we expose our bodies to with pipes and cigars leads to more oral health problems, including more gum disease. The Journal of the American Dental Association reports how cigar smokers have bone loss (tooth and jaw) at the same rate as those who smoke cigarettes. Also, those who use pipes to smoke have a similar risk of tooth losstobacco and your oral health

3. …and smoking increases the risk of cancer.

People are aware that smoking puts you at greater risk for lung disease. And, while smoking directly contributes to gum disease (and oral disease in our body), it also puts you at greater risk for throat cancer and oral cancer. The Oral Cancer Foundation reports that if you expand the definition of oral and oropharyngeal cancers to include cancer of the larynx, the numbers of people who get diagnosed increases to about 54,000 individuals per year. What’s more alarming is that there are 13,500 deaths per year in the U.S. alone for those kinds of cancers (1, 2)!

Truths About Smoking

Sure, losing your sense of taste and smell and having bad breath are negative side effects of smoking, but if someone needs more of a deterrent, share this blog with them so they can see the tobacco-oral cancer connection.

In general, more than 20 million Americans have died because of smoking since the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health was issued more than 50 years ago (1, 2).

If you want to maintain good overall health—including oral health, you should avoid smoking. For those who already smoke, know that quitting before age 40 can reduce excess mortality attributable to continued smoking by 90 percent (5). Also, quitting before age 30 reduces risk levels by more than 97 percent (5). Those are good figures to know to motivate us into taking steps to quit a habit that has so many negative impacts on our well-being.

References/Sources

  1. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/smoking-and-tobacco
  1. http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/facts/
  1. https://www.sharecare.com/health/healthy-teeth-and-mouth/can-smoking-irritate-your-gums
  1. http://www.pensacoladentist.us/page/The-Effects-of-Smoking-on-Your-Dental-Health
  1. http://www.dentalhealth.ie/dentalhealth/causes/smoking.html
  1. http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/89/8/572.long
  1. http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/tobacco/tobacco-as-a-cause.php

What to Know About Microbeads in Your Toothpaste

Sunday, January 17th, 2016

is this safe hagen dental microbeads

“What’s all this I’m hearing about microbeads?”

Microbeads are scrubbing beads that have commonly been used in a variety of exfolianting products. They’ve also been used to provide color in products ranging from soap to gum! Recently, more attention has been garnered for how they are used by popular brands in cosmetics as well toothpaste.

By definition, they are called “microbeads” because they are less than 5 millimeters in diameter—but many microbeads used in toothpaste, lip balm and makeup are much, much smaller.

“…But are microbeads in my toothpaste safe?”

The answer is that the polyethylene microbeads that are used in brands including Crest Toothpaste and others are microbeads that are safe (1). While you can always ask us when you have questions about any toothpaste or oral hygiene product, a general rule of thumb is that products that have the ADA Seal are products that have been independently evaluated by the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs for their safety.

With that said, Crest (the brand receiving most of the attention for its use of microbeads) has committed to removing all microbeads in its toothpastes going forward. They have already removed microbeads in the majority of their toothpastes.

“What exactly is the concern with microbeads in my toothpaste?”

The microbeads used in the majority of toothpaste brands today are in fact safe—however, some people still prefer not to use toothpaste with microbeads as a precaution. The concern is that chemically, these tiny particles are plastic microspheres, and some people would rather see more biodegradable particles in their makeup, personal care products and in their toothpaste.

what to know about MICROBEADS

Taking a step back, know that polyethylene (which is what you would see on the list of ingredients in any product that has these kinds of microbeads) is an FDA-approved food additive. Microbeads are an inactive ingredient and they are not associated with any health risk.

Many of your favorite toothpaste brands have many toothpastes that do not contain any microbeads.

According to the Crest blog, they have a long list of toothpastes that have no microbeads whatsoever. The list includes:

  • Crest Pro-Health Advanced Smooth Mint
  • Crest 3D White Radiant Mint
  • Crest Sensi Repair & Prevent, Crest Pro-Health [HD]
  • Crest Whitening + Scope, Crest Baking Soda Peroxide
  • Crest Extra Whitening, Crest Cavity
  • Crest Tartar + Whitening (1)

You can see that’s quite a long list that offers you microbead-free brushing, if desired—and that is just Crest alone. As mentioned, it was recently announced that due to media attention as well as consumer concern and confusion, Crest is removing all of the microbeads by late February/March of this year. The majority of all Crest products, as well as others available on the shelf, are already microbead-free. Because of a growing consumer sentiment that reflected a preference to remove all microbeads, other brands that also made this pledge include L’Oreal, Neutrogena, Unilever and Johnson & Johnson.

Want to talk more with us about microbeads and whether or not they are safe for you and your family? Contact us online or give us a call today to schedule your next appointment at 513.251.5500.

References/Further Reading

  1. http://crestfaq.tumblr.com/

20 Interesting Health & Dental Facts to Start the New Year

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016
  1. Just how hard is a tooth? Your enamel is the hardest part of your body.
  1. Gum disease is a problem for a growing number of people… One in every two people who are older than 30 have some form of periodontal disease, which is about 65 million Americans. Brushing twice a day, flossing and going to your dentist can help detect and prevent gum disease.
  1. Dr. Hagen attended St. Xavier High School and Xavier University before earning his dental degree from The Ohio State University School of Dentistry.
  1. Oh no! It’s said that roughly 27 percent of adults lie about how often they floss their teeth!
  1. People can take advantage of Snap-On Smile™ a removable, cosmetic dental appliance that provides comfort and function to give you a beautiful smile. It is a non-invasive alternative for a brand new smile, but it can easily give you that smile you’ve been missing! This approach requires no adhesives or glue of any kind. We are talking no tooth removal, bonding, drilling or shots!
  1. As many as 400 medications people take affect their saliva production in their mouth, which is part of why we want to know about any medications you may be taking.
  1. Unfortunately, 36,000 people will be diagnosed with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancer this year, and these cancers will cause 6,850 deaths. Going to your dentist is one of the top preventative measures (and also avoiding tobacco) that you can take to make sure you are doing all you can to spot anything unusual in your mouth or with your jaw.

    taking care of your oral health cincinnati dentist

  1. We only have two sets of teeth our entire lifetime…our baby teeth and our permanent teeth, which is why we want to take good care of them!
  1. Seeing the health of your mouth tells us about your total health, in part because many risk factors for diseases and conditions are connected with the health of our mouth! For example, a diet that lacks nutrition can not only mean dental issues, but it can result in diabetes, stroke, obesity or other issues. Also, periodontal disease can contribute to cardiovascular diseases and other chronic diseases.

    periodontal disease cincinnati dentist

  1. The most teeth (according to the Guinness World Records) in the mouth are 37, achieved by Vijay Kumar V.A, 27, as verified in Bangalore, India. This is five more than normal!
  1. Over a lifetime, the average American likely spends about 38.5 total days brushing their teeth!
  1. Dr. Hagenparticipated in the Blood, Sweat & Gears bike race each year. The Blood, Sweat & Gears title given to the race is not an exaggeration by any means—it’s a grueling, 100-mile ride taking place in North Carolina’s High Country. If you guessed that takes a lot of training and preparation, then you guessed right!

    dr hagen dentist in cincinnati

  1. When it’s right for you, CEREC™ technology gives you a perfect-fitting crown in just one visit! This system uses a computer program to design and mill the restoration. It will create the crown in just a few minutes! Just imagine what people used to do!
  1. Invisalign is another approach that’s becoming increasingly popular. It offers barely-visible trays that are utilized to move people’s teeth—it’s an alternative to braces for people who are candidates. People who have gapped teeth, overbite, crossbite, or underbite and overcrowding can benefit. The trays themselves, which look similar to a teeth-whitening tray, will actually move your teeth about .2 to .25 mm at a time.
  1. You might just say that Hagen “does it all.” Dr. Hagen has in-depth knowledge about sleep dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, crown and bridge restorations, CEREC, Invisalign, and much, much more.
  1. Your child’s first dental visit should be around age 3. This way, we can make sure everything is progressing as it should!
  1. US consumers buy 14 million gallons of toothpaste every year.
  1. What color is your toothbrush? More people use blue toothbrushes than red.
  1. Cincinnati Magazine approached more than 5,000 physicians and asked them the question: “Who would you turn to if you, a family member, or a friend needed medical attention?” The result when his peers were asked this question? Dr. Hagen was selected as a Top Doctor.

    Dr Hagen DDS Cincinnati Top Doctor

  1. About one third of each tooth is underneath your gums. No wonder our gum health is so important!

References/Sources

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/oralcavityandoropharyngealcancer/detailedguide/oral-cavity-and-oropharyngeal-cancer-key-statistics

http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/news/2015/9/revealed-the-astounding-new-record-holders-in-guinness-world-records-2016-editio-395642

http://acceledent.com/blog/10-fun-facts-about-teeth/

http://www.childrensdentalvillage.net/patient/resources/interesting-facts/

https://www.perio.org/consumer/quarter-of-adults-dishonest-with-dentists

Say “Ahh” with Fresher Breath, Less Plaque Buildup & More

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

top cincinnati dentist

We know our tongues help us speak and chew food, but our tongues also help maintain the health of our mouth!

It’s time we talk about the tongue, and how it’s crucial for our entire health and well-being.

Have you ever had bad breath?

Chances are, at some point or another you have! It might have just been in the morning, or after a cup of coffee…Whatever the cause, one of the most common sources of bad breath can be the tongue.

That’s because, believe it or not, most of the bacteria in the mouth actually live on our tongue.

Inside the Mouth

Bacteria like to live on our tongue. Because of this, bacteria can be difficult to remove even with brushing and flossing. As a result, some people like to use a tongue scraper.

Using a tongue scraper helps proactively remove food, debris, fungi, toxins, dead cells…and well, yes, bacteria, from the surface of our tongue.

There are several benefits to using a tongue scraper or to taking extra, dedicated time to brushing your tongue thoroughly each day. Beyond just fighting bad breath that can be embarrassing, there are two other benefits to know about when it comes to keeping our tongue clean!

1. Resets our food palate, helping us stay nourished.

When we scrape or focus efforts on cleaning our tongue, we are able to activate saliva production. As you may know if you’re a regular Hagen blog reader, saliva helps naturally clean the teeth. Saliva is also a crucial component in kick-starting our digestion.

At the very start of digestion is when we get to taste and savor our food. When we have a clean tongue, we are better able to taste flavors. Just think: you are potentially removing a coated tongue, and removing “clogged” taste buds in the process.

Better tasting food should be enough reason alone to brush your tongue!

2. Keeps your immune system strong.

Has your tongue ever looked like a color you were not used to seeing, or almost as if it were fully “coated”? That could be due to dead cells and foot particles, which is what cleaning our tongue helps remove…

The tongue is the gatekeeper to our health, in many ways, that means it helps keep out many bad toxins that can affect our immunity. We also begin to break down nutrients in the mouth thanks to the tongue, as mentioned, which is another major factor influencing our total health, and the body’s ability to fight off germs.

cincinnati dentist hagen dental dds


Does your tongue look irregular? If you have any of these signs, here’s what it could mean. Ask us for more information.

 

Ready to learn more?

If you are interested in learning more about your tongue or a tongue scraper, ask us for more information. We can see if you are a better candidate for a tongue brush (effective at loosening particles on the surface of the tongue) or a tongue scraper (effective at gathering bacteria and particles and removing them from the mouth). Some people, at first, find they need to use the tongue scraper daily. Others, over time, begin to use it less often. Ask us for more guidance.

You know that clean feeling when you leave the dentist?

Toxins and build-up have been removed, which is part of why your mouth feels so great. If you are ready to start going to the dentist regularly again, or if you need a new dentist, give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit us at http://hagendds.com/

The Real Story Behind the Tooth Fairy

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

The Tooth Fairy

They say the three most famous figures in mythology are Santa, the Easter Bunny and…the tooth fairy!

For many of us, all three might have meant gifts at one time or another in our life.

Many are familiar with the stories behind Santa and the Easter Bunny, but what about the tooth fairy?

How and Why Did the Tooth Fairy Folklore Begin?

When we’re young and we lose teeth, we quickly learn that we can place the baby tooth underneath our pillow. Then—as the folklore goes—as we sleep, the tooth fairy will come and replace that lost tooth with a small amount of money.

Across Europe and around the world, the concept of exchanging baby teeth for a “fee” in return was seen as early as the 13th century. And not all the rituals with baby teeth had to do with money: baby tooth-related rituals have ranged from throwing teeth into the sun, throwing teeth into fire and even hiding or burying the baby teeth once they fell out.

It has also been documented that in both Russia and Mexico, among other places, people have sacrificed a mouse when a child loses a tooth! The idea behind the ritual was said to be that by sacrificing a mouse, the child’s adult teeth would grow in as strong and sturdy as the rodent’s teeth. Anthropologists call the underlying idea “sympathetic magic.”

We don’t know about you, but we’ll stick with putting a tooth underneath a pillow for a little financial incentive!

The Newcomer on the Mythological Scene

Although it is true that Europeans had some form of ritual around baby teeth, accounts vary on how that gifting process first translated into a tooth fairy leaving the gift behind.

Most likely the source? A story from France!

There was a tradition from 18th century France of a “tooth mouse,” potentially loosely based off a story La Bonne Petite Souris. In this story, a fairy changes into a mouse, and hides under a pillow in order to taunt the King. She then punishes him by knocking out all his teeth. This could have been a start to the earliest of ideas of the tooth fairy as the “good fairy.”

The tooth fairy (or “good fairy”) is said to have first been publicly referenced dating back to 1908, when the Chicago Daily Tribune gave reference to it. Other historians prefer the origin being closer to 1927, and still others say it was later in the 50, 60s or 70s when the tradition really began or gained popularity.

Just as the tooth fairy was gaining popularity, pop culture helped reinforce the concept. At the time, Disney was releasing films including Cinderella and Pinocchio; these undoubtedly helped solidify the idea of the tooth fairy in children’s minds and imaginations.

Some point to the fact that people were looking to encourage the idea in children of taking good care of their teeth—and that their teeth were in fact valued, around this time period. The tradition and idea of a tooth fairy made tooth disposal more lighthearted, and as a result, was embraced by families. It’s also said that parents saw it as a way to also help children get over any fear of losing a tooth. What is known is that by 1970s, when the tooth fairy was mentioned on the radio, the American Dental Association was inundated with inquiries about the fairy! Families and children loved the story.

A Very Good—and Popular—Fairy

The tooth fairy may be young, but she is getting more generous with time: the amount of money left behind by a tooth fairy does tend to increase with the rate of inflation.

Just how much does the tooth fairy leave, on average?

Researchers at Visa examined just how generous she is, finding that she leaves about $3.70 per tooth, a number that was steadily increasing over time.

The tooth fairy isn’t just embraced by young children. According to a Well’s Survey, 97 percent of parents feel neutral or positive about the tooth fairy. She may not be as celebrated as Santa and the Easter Bunny, but we like to hear the entire family embraces her!

Looking for a dentist that can take care of your entire family? Give Hagen Dental a call today at 513-251-5550.

References

All About Lucy Hobbs Taylor, The First Woman DDS With the Cincinnati Connection

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Lucy Hobbs was born on March 14, 1833 in New York. Consider life then: Andrew Jackson was President, and at this time, most people lived in rural locations. Life was much shorter, with a life expectancy between 40 and 50 years old. Clothes were made by hand. This is even during a time when there was no indoor plumbing in rural areas!

Fast-forward more than 20 years, and Hobbs began her career as a teacher. She then made the move to Cincinnati, Ohio in 1859.

cincinnati dentist

Lucy Beaman Hobbs Taylor. Photo courtesy of kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. For some, the name may sound a bit familiar: that’s because a scrubs and lab coat company, designed and named one of their lab coats after Hobbs Taylor. Called the Lucy H.T. Lab Coat, the company says they named the line of apparel after her “tribute to this amazing, prestigious, and accomplished woman.”

She wanted to become a dentist. She’s reported to have said that she wanted “to enter a profession where [I] could earn [my] bread not alone by the sweat of [my] brow, but by the use of [my] brains also.”

At first, she was refused admission because she was female. No woman had ever graduated dentistry school before at this point in US history, although about 4 years prior a woman named Emeline Roberts Jones became the first woman to practice dentistry. (She had been married to a dentist, and he allowed her to be his assistant.)

But Hobbs did not give up on her dream. Jonathan Taft, Dean of the Ohio College of Dental Surgery is said to have welcomed Hobbs into his office until another dentist agreed to teach her.

Hobbs began her own private program of study and soon made up her mind she would also have her own practice one day.

A Cincinnati Connection

After learning from her mentor and eventually receiving a doctorate in dentistry, despite being refused initially by the school, she started her practice in Cincinnati, making Dr. Lucy—as her patients called her—the first official woman in the US to do so.

People were amazed when they learned that a young girl had wanted to study dentistry, she explained at the time. Things sure have changed since that time!

She would then make the move to the state of Iowa to practice dentistry. By 1865, she had earned the respect of her peers who allowed her to join the Iowa State Dental Society. “The profession has nothing in its pursuits foreign to the instincts of women,” asserted the Dental Society at the time. The move helped reinforce the idea that woman could be involved in the dental industry.

Later in life, she married a railroad car painter named James M. Taylor. Ever the persuasive person, she then convinced him that he should become a dentist alongside her. After he agreed, they practiced dentistry in Lawrence, Kansas. Speaking about these years, she’s quoted as saying, “I am a New Yorker by birth, but I love my adopted country—the West. To it belongs the credit of making it possible for women to be recognized in the dental profession on equal terms with men.”

After her husband died, Hobbs Taylor took on campaigns that supported women’s rights. Less than 20 years after she became the first woman to graduate dentistry school, the American Association of Women Dentists honored Hobbs Taylor by establishing the Lucy Hobbs Taylor Award. This award is now presented annually to an American Association of Women Dentists member in recognition of professional excellence and achievements in advancing the role of women in dentistry.

It’s reported that by 1900, ten years before Hobbs Taylor’s death, about one thousand other woman followed Hobbs Taylor’s footsteps in becoming involved in the field of dentistry. Thanks in part to pioneer women such as Hobbs Taylor who refused to give up on their dreams when first told “no,” hundreds of thousands of women have been able to participate in the field of dentistry since.

When she died, her obituary captured her local legacy, saying she was “one of the most striking figures of Lawrence [who] occupied a position of honor and ability, and for years she occupied a place high in the ranks of her profession.”

First a pioneer, then a dentist, and then a mentor, Lucy Hobbs Taylor changed the face of dentistry, and even though her name isn’t necessarily widely recognized, the first woman DDS still did have a meaningful impact on history.

References

  • http://dent.umich.edu/about-school/sindecuse-museum/lucy-beaman-hobbs-taylor-first-woman-dds
  • http://home.comcast.net/~thorsdag/LucyHobbsTaylor.html

What Effect Does Rigorous Exercise Have on My Teeth?

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

Rigorous exercise may affect our teeth and mouth in ways that we would not expect.

study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine in 2013, examined 278 athletes during the 2012 Summer Olympics, and found that most of them actually had very high levels of tooth decay and gum disease.

hagen dental cincinnati dentist“Higher risk for dental erosions, exercise-dependent caries risk, and load-dependent changes in saliva parameters point out the need for risk-adapted preventive dental concepts in the field of sports dentistry,” reported the study.
But what about studies that looked at people who all had a higher degree of access to quality dental care, which some in the Olympic study did not have?

For this kind of information, we turn to a study published in the International Journal of Sports Medicine concluded that elite athletes often use “training strategies that coincide with risk factors for dental caries and erosion.” (Source.)

Just what were those habits that were looked at?

The study, which was aimed at identifying specific risk factors for dental caries in elite triathletes, looked at nutrition, to start.

Researchers found that nearly 84 percent of these endurance athletes consumed sports drinks when they trained.

About half of them took small sips, often from a bottle, meaning often the teeth had prolonged exposure to sugar, which feeds bacteria of the mouth. Although that was only part of the story, the study also showed how this kind of nutrition contributed to some of the athletes’ mouth’s having a pH below 5.5. Having that “off balance” pH level in the mouth can contribute to erosion and caries.

Another recent study included 35 triathletes and 35 non-exercising controls. This study found that athletes had an increased risk for dental erosion, but not caries—although their risk for caries also increased as training time each week increased.

In other words, in this research, the more they trained, the higher risk they had for caries.

Keep in mind that these “extreme” athletes, such as triathletes, are exercising for an average of 9 hours per week. It is less of a surprise, then, that there was a high degree of carbohydrate consumption in these athletes, including sports drinks, gels, and bars.

Many people also tend to breathe heavily through their mouth during exercise. Mouth breathing reduces the flow of saliva and dries out your mouth. This too allows bacteria to thrive—so you can see why for people who train for multiple hours per day, this could affect their dental health.

Based on such findings, it would seem like a smart idea to brush your teeth after prolonged exercise such as cycling, swimming and/or running, especially if you had carbohydrate-rich snacks during the prolonged training period. But it also begs the question: does exercise really do the body—or our teeth/mouth—good?

The answer is yes, it does do the body good! And this research should not suggest that we cut back on our exercise or training regimens.

Just because these studies suggest you are at a heightened risk for dental erosion as an endurance athlete, it does not mean that this risk outweighs the benefits received from these activities. In fact, research has shown time and time again that exercise is the single best preventive measure for many diseases! That should not be forgotten.

Instead of worrying about the potential uptick in risk, we need to make sure our daily habits work to undo any saliva- or nutrition-related issues due to prolonged, intense training regimens.

Be sure to be intentional and consistent with your dental health, just as you would be about your training.

As researchers also pointed out, exercise alone might not be the factor that is affecting the oral health of these participants, as the number of people in the studies was notably low.

What you can do as an endurance athlete to help prevent tooth decay:

  • Talk to your Dentist about your rigorous training schedule when you go in for your regular visits.
  • Floss your teeth in the morning and at night.
  • Drink lots of water, and stay hydrated—which most athletes actually do! Also remember that staying hydrated does not guarantee any kind of change of pH in the mouth.
  • Examine the sugar content in your favorite training snacks to make sure you are aware of how much sugar you are consuming.
  • Continue to brush your teeth each day, but know that citric acids in sports drinks or gels will soften your tooth enamel, so in some cases, it is not ideal to brush your teeth directly after consuming.

Have questions on anything you are reading? Let us know; after all, this blog is general advice that is not specific to any one person. Find more www.hagendds.com

References

http://www.mensfitness.com/life/intense-exercise-could-be-bad-your-teeth#sthash.IkyPbMO3.dpuf

http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2013/12/27/proper-exercise-breathing.aspx

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=frese+dental+erosion

Green Tea: Good or Bad for Our Teeth?

Sunday, March 15th, 2015

is green tea good or bad for teeth

The short answer is that brewed, unsweetened tea (in moderation) is good for our teeth. 

According to the General Dentistry, a clinical, peer-reviewed journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, drinking green tea does not lead to any teeth erosion.

This is quite different from when we drink pop, certain energy drinks, or sports drinks which are packed with enamel-damaging acids. (More on dental erosion here.)

Less Tooth Decay and Less Inflammation

This same study also supported the finding that green tea can have a positive effect on our gums, too. Specifically, drinking green tea every day resulting in less gum recession and less gum bleeding. A separate German study found that people even saw greater gum health when they simply chewed green tea extract! (We’ll just stick with a glass of green tea!)

Better Smelling Breath

Green tea also cuts down on microbes that contribute to bad breath. In fact, in one study, green tea was better at reducing bad breath when compared to mints, chewing gum and even parsley.

What are some of the other benefits of green tea? After all, it’s been called one of the healthiest beverages we can consume…

The Other Health Benefits of Green Tea

Green tea has many important nutrients, including compounds known as polyphenols. These are natural plant compounds and they include catechins, theaflavins, tannins, and flavonoids. These polyphenols have been shown to have positive benefits on our health, including being powerful antioxidants.

In part, this means they can help reduce the formation of free radicals in our body, which can help protect cells and molecules from damage. Assuming we choose a quality brand, these compounds we get from green tea can also support enzyme function and help stimulate our cell receptors. Studies have shown that flavonoids can help improve our insulin sensitivity as well.

While you can almost never go wrong with water as your beverage of choice, green tea in moderation is an alternative with health benefits that much research has supported.

Sources for this blog: