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Mouth Sores: The Basics You Should Know

Monday, December 4th, 2017

cincinnati dentist

True dental health involves the entire mouth, so we’re trained to examine and identify problems with all the tissues of the mouth! Sores and irritations are common occurrences in the mouth.

Read on to learn about the most common oral sores, some of their causes, what you can do, and more.

Causes Of Mouth Sores

Sores in the mouth can stem from a variety of causes, including:

  • Infections from bacteria, viruses or fungus (1).
  • Irritation from a broken tooth, filling, piercing, loose orthodontic wire or other sharp appliance, or a denture that doesn’t fit (1).
  • Sores can be a symptom of a greater disease or disorder (1).
  • Immune system challenges and problems (2).

cincinnati dentist

The Most Common Mouth Sores

1. Canker Sores:

Canker sores develop in the soft tissues of the mouth, including the tongue, gums, uvula, or insides of the cheeks. They are typically white or gray sores with a red border. The good news about canker sores is they are NOT contagious. Their cause is hard to pinpoint, but could be related to other immune issues, oral hygiene issues, food irritation, stress, bacteria, viruses, or even trauma to the soft tissue (2).

Canker sores will typically heal on their own; however, it can take several days up to two weeks. If they are painful or causing problems with eating or talking, over-the-counter mouthwashes and pain killers designed for this type of sore can provide relief and help during the healing process. While a canker sore is healing, spicy, acidic, and overly salty foods should be avoided to minimize irritation and pain (2).

 2. Cold Sores:

Cold sores are also known as fever blisters. They present as a group of fluid-filled blisters around the lips, under the nose, or even around the chin. Cold sores are caused by the herpes simplex type 1 virus, and are VERY contagious. The initial infection of this virus will often be confused with a cold or flu. The main difference is that painful sores and lesions will emerge throughout the mouth (3).

Once a person is infected, the virus stays in the body and will cause periodic attacks. Some people notice that stress or other immune challenges can bring on an eruption. Cold sores will usually heal in about a week by themselves. If the blister is painful, over-the-counter topical medications can provide some pain relief. If the breakouts are severe or frequent, we can also prescribe antiviral drugs (3).

3. Thrush:

Thrush is a fungal infection that occurs when the yeast known as Candida albicans becomes overgrown in the oral cavity. It can reproduce rapidly in large numbers, causing an overgrowth and subsequent thrush infection (4).

Thrush is most common in people with weakened immune systems, in which the body’s own defenses can’t keep the Candida albicans in check. This population includes the very young, the elderly, or those who are affected by other diseases, such as diabetes or leukemia. Dry mouth syndromes and denture use both also make thrush more likely. Another risk factor is antibiotic treatment, which decreases the normal bacterial flora in the mouth, and gives Candida yeast a chance to flourish (4).

The best way to prevent and control thrush is focusing on good oral hygiene as well as controlling or preventing the conditions that make Candida more likely to reproduce rapidly (4).

cincinnati dentist4. Leukoplakia:

Leukoplakia are patches that form on the inside of the cheeks, gums or tongue. They are thick and whitish in color. They are caused by excessive cell growth (5).

Leukoplakia can result from irritations in the mouth, such as ill-fitting dentures or appliances, or in the case of people who are in the habit of chewing on the insides of the cheeks. These lesions are also common among tobacco users. Leukoplakia can, in some cases, be associated with oral cancer. We need to evaluate the lesion and might recommend a biopsy if the leukoplakia patch looks dangerous (5).

Removing and quitting those irritations that can result in leukoplakia are the first steps in treatment. For example, quitting tobacco or replacing anything ill-fitting appliances in the mouth are one of the first recommendations when dealing with leukoplakia from these causes (5).

We Are Here To Help!

While none of this is medical advice, these are some of the basics to know about when it comes to mouth sores. All mouth sores that last longer than a week should be examined by a dentist! Have you noticed new or recent sores in your mouth? Do you have a question about an unusual change in your oral soft tissue? It’s important that you have us analyze and take a look to rule out anything sinister or life-threatening. Whether for your next appointment or for another reason, be sure to give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/m/mouth-sores
  2. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/c/canker-sores
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/c/cold-sores
  4. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/thrush
  5. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/l/leukoplakia

Understanding Your Teeth: Each Tooth Has A Job To Do!

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

Have you ever wondered why we have so many varied teeth? What are all the types of teeth that make up our smile? These different shapes and sizes aren’t by accident – they all play a role! Teeth are important for and have various roles in chewing and digesting food, support aspects of our facial structure, and play a part in our speech and language capabilities (1,2).

cincinnati dentist

Types of Teeth

A full set of adult teeth include 32 permanent teeth, including the four wisdom teeth. These 32 teeth can be divided into four categories: incisors, canines, premolars, and molars (3).

Incisors

Incisors are the thin teeth with a sharp biting surface located in the front of the mouth. There are four on the top and four on the bottom. They are the teeth that comprise the majority of our visible smile (1,4).

These front teeth are used primarily for taking initial bites of food, cutting or shearing food into smaller chewable pieces, and pulling the food into our mouths. They also play an important role in proper speech and pronunciation as we speak. Additionally, they support the lip tissues (2, 3, 4).

Incisors are also the very first to arrive in the mouth, both in their primary form (baby teeth) and permanent, adult form (1, 4).

Canines

Canines are also known as Cuspids, or “fangs” for slang. These are located just behind the incisors, at the “corners” of the dental arches, and are our longest type of tooth. There are two canines in the top row and two on the bottom – one on each side, respectively. These are the sharpest of all the teeth, with very jagged, pointed biting surfaces. Their function is to grip food and tear it apart, as well as help guide the mouth and jaw into the best biting position (1,3,4).cincinnati dentist

Premolars

Moving further back into the mouth, we get to the premolars, which are also known as Bicuspids. These teeth have a flatter biting surface. They are used primarily for tearing, crushing, and grinding food during chewing. This part of the chewing process makes food more easily consumable and more easily swallowed. There are a total of eight premolars (1, 3, 4).

Molars

There are a total of twelve molars, including the wisdom teeth. They come in sets of four and are termed “first molars”, “second molars”, and “third molars”. Molars are the largest of all the teeth. Similar to the premolars, they have a large, flat biting surface. The function of all twelve molars is to chew, crush and grind food (1,3).

The wisdom teeth are the four molars which are often termed “third molars”, since they erupt into the mouth last; typically in the late teen years (although some people never develop them at all)! Many people get their wisdom teeth removed if they do not have enough room for them; they are located so far back in the jaw that they can cause crowding issues or bite misalignments if they are left to grow in (1, 4).

Some people consider wisdom teeth to actually be a fifth category of tooth. However, for functional classification, wisdom teeth fall into the “molar” category. For those who have room to allow their third molars to grow in, these teeth are used for chewing, crushing and grinding food – just like the other eight molars (1, 3).

A Clean And Healthy Mouth Is Good For Your Body!

Oral health is not only important for a great looking smile! The health of your teeth plays a role in ensuring ease of eating and digestion, proper speech, proper facial structure, and of course and plays a part in your overall health. At Hagen, we know the importance of keeping all your teeth healthy and strong – no matter what their shape or size. Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. https://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/basics/types-teeth-how-they-function/
  2. http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/basics/mouth-and-teeth-anatomy/article/four-different-types-of-teeth-plus-more-0115
  3. https://www.dentalhealth.ie/children/toothdevelopment/types.html
  4. https://aci.edu/five-types-human-teeth-function/

 

Don’t Neglect Your Dental Health While Away at College

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

oral health tips while at college

Midterms are in full force, you are deep into your class load, the manager from your part time job is calling to see if you can pick up an extra shift, there are intramural sports to be played, and there’s plenty of partying to be done on the weekend. As a college student, you are busy, and you have all the freedom and independence you want to make your own health decisions. But now is not the time to let your dental health go by the wayside due to your tightly packed schedule.

A 2016 study of dental health practices in US college students found that 76% of students reported having at least one dental exam in the year prior to their survey. But the study also found that dental health care habits and regular dental visits declined annually following the students’ freshman years.

Students cited reasons such as having a healthy mouth and not feeling they needed dental care, not having the time to go to the dentist, and worries about the cost of their visit for the explanations as to why they were missing their regular checkups (1).

Unfortunately, putting your oral health on the backburner is not a good choice. When it comes to your mouth and teeth, prevention is always cheaper and easier than waiting until a problem arises. Regular checkups can allow us to find issues before you show signs of pain and more advanced dental disease.

College students are also at risk for oral health changes because of poor dietary choices, changes in routine, and putting off regular visits to the dentist. Even though there is a lot on your plate and even more on your mind, there is hope!

Try these tips to maintain good oral hygiene while you make your way through your college years!

Keep it real. Eat “real foods” rather than packaged and processed foods to help minimize unnecessary sugars. Snacks such as fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts or seeds are great choices (2).

Keep sugar to a minimum.  Avoid using sugar as a stress reliever. Increased sugar intake increases your risk for decay and cavities.

Watch your late night eating and hygiene habits. Avoid late night snacking, or falling asleep without brushing your teeth. This habit leaves sugars and acids in your mouth to wreak havoc on your enamel until morning. Leftover food particles also become a breeding ground for bacteria. Furthermore, this sets you up for a bad case of morning breath (3).

Remember to exercise! Also be sure to develop regular exercise and good sleep habits. These routines are important and helpful for managing stress levels and maintaining both dental health and overall health during your college years (2).

Look at your entire health. Minimize or avoid alcohol use and smoking. College students sometimes experiment with these two behaviors, both of which cause dry mouth, changes in the pH of the mouth, and an increased risk for tooth decay or gum disease (2). Alcohol abuse also makes it more likely that you will skip or forget your nighttime dental cleaning routine.

Start with water! Choose water over sodas, energy drinks, and other sugary drinks. The acids found in carbonated and sugary drinks are very hard on your enamel (2, 3).

Brush and floss daily. These are time-tested habits that keep your oral health up. Even when you get home late or your schedule feels too busy, be sure to floss and brush. We recommend brushing twice a day with a soft brush, and flossing once a day (4). This investment takes about 5 minutes, which means you only have to dedicate 0.3% of your day to reap the rewards of a healthy smile.

Remember your regular dentist visits! Either find a great dentist near your school, or schedule your dental checkups around visits back to your hometown – over the holidays or school breaks. Don’t leave your next appointment without scheduling your next one!

dental exams

Call Hagen Dental Today

Are you overdue for your next dental cleaning? Or perhaps you are enrolled in school in the Cincinnati area and need to find a great dental practice while you are away from home? Give Hagen Dental a call to answer your questions or to schedule your next appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1363&context=jhdrp
  2. http://www.deardoctor.com/articles/10-health-tips-for-college-students/
  3. http://compdentalhealth.com/blog/college-students-oral-health/
  4. http://dental.ufl.edu/patient-care/patient-information/oral-health-tips-for-all-life-stages/

9 Dental Myths That People Still Believe

Monday, July 25th, 2016

9 Dental Myths That People Still BelieveYou hear a variety of things all the time about your oral health – from friends, your family, the media, from advertisements, and more…so how do you know what to believe and what to ignore? Finally, here are answers to your questions! In this post, we separate fact from fiction and drill down on those dental myths.

Myth #1: Brushing and flossing extra well before your dental appointment will hide the fact that you haven’t been keeping up with your regular brushing and flossing habits.

Ramping up your brushing and flossing a few days before you visit the dentist doesn’t mean you can “undo” the months where your oral hygiene habits were lacking! In fact, adding in extra oral hygiene after letting it go for a while has the potential to actually inflame your gums, making them swollen, red and more likely to bleed.

Your dentist will know your secret! There’s nothing that can substitute for regular care in between your dental visits. (1).

Myth #2: If your gums bleed, you should stop brushing and flossing.

It turns out, the opposite is true: you don’t want to stop brushing or flossing if you notice your gum is bleeding or irritated! Plaque build-up and food debris on the teeth are the culprits behind gum bleeding. Regular brushing and flossing is the best way to remove plaque build-up and food from the mouth. If the plaque build-up is too severe, getting a dental cleaning is the best choice to get the problem under control (1, 2). If your gum is bleeding abnormally or doesn’t stop, you want to let us know, too.

myth bustingMyth #3: Brushing MORE will always improve the health of your teeth.

More is not better in this case—especially if you tend to brush too hard. Over-brushing your teeth can wear the enamel down due to the abrasive properties of your toothpaste. Rinsing your mouth out after eating is a safe alternative to extra brushing sessions. Using a soft bristled brush also helps avoid problems from those prone to brushing too hard (1, 2).

Myth #4: Babies don’t need to go to the dentist.

We now recommend bringing in your toddler at around 18 months. This is typically about the time when some, but not all, of their baby teeth are in. The checkup will also allow you to ask questions and get any advice on how you can continue to promote a healthy dental routine for your baby—for life!

Myth #5: Dental treatment and visits to the dentist should be avoided during pregnancy.

Very false! During pregnancy, blood flow, hormones, and often a woman’s diet will change. This can cause an increase in bacteria in your mouth, which leads to an increased likelihood for dental issues such as gingivitis, bleeding gums, or development of cavities over the course of the pregnancy.

Be sure to keep that dental check-up during pregnancy! X-rays will likely be avoided, unless absolutely necessary, but many dental procedures, including cleanings are completely safe for pregnant women and can help prevent inflammation. It’s also very important to maintain good oral health to avoid adverse effects on your developing baby (1, 5).

Myth #6: If there is no visible issue in your mouth, you don’t need to see your dentist.

Just because you can’t see a problem, doesn’t mean you should skip your regular dental checkup. Your dental cleanings and exams each year help ensure your teeth STAY healthy! It’s also important to find any dental problems early so they don’t become serious (2). Don’t forget that your dentist visit also includes oral cancer screenings, too.

Myth #7: Teeth whitening will damage your enamel.

New technology has made teeth whitening much safer! (Zoom! Whitening, anyone?) You can stick with professional whitening for the safest options, and ask us any questions you have about the process (2)!

Myth #8: Losing baby teeth to tooth decay is okay – that’s what adult teeth are for, right?

False! Losing a baby tooth to tooth decay is not insignificant. This can result in damage to the developing crowns of the permanent teeth just below the baby tooth. It could also mean the child is not developing proper dietary and dental health habits to promote healthy teeth down the line (3).

Myth #9: You’ll know when you have a cavity.

Sometimes you’ll know when you have a cavity or an issue of some kind…but many times you won’t! And by the time you can feel the discomfort of a cavity, it has probably spread to a larger area than it would have if it had been caught at a regular dental cleaning and examination (4).

Have More Questions About Your Dental Health? We Can’t Wait to Meet You & Your Family

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

Sources

  1. http://www.stlawrencedentistry.com/top-10-dental-myths/
  2. http://www.1800dentist.com/dental-myths-separating-fact-from-fiction-finally/
  3. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100805103926.htm
  4. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/cavities-myths
  5. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-care-pregnancy

 

Foods (And Drinks) That Damage Your Enamel

Friday, July 15th, 2016

Did you know? Your tooth enamel health is directly related to what you are eating, including those beverages you are drinking!

Keeping your teeth healthy involves more than just brushing and flossing.

foods and drinks that can damage your enamel hagen dental

Your enamel is the hard outer layer of your teeth. In fact, it’s the hardest substance in the human body—and for good reason! This surface layer helps protect the sensitive inner parts of the tooth from decay and damage. However, even enamel is subject to harm if not treated well. It is normal for some wear and tear to occur, but by focusing on what you are feeding your body (and thus putting into your mouth) you can keep that outer barrier of your teeth stronger (5).

Maintain the Health of Your Enamel

Here are some foods to avoid or minimize for optimum enamel health:

Sugary Foods: Increased sugars feed bacteria in your mouth. Left unchecked, these bacteria produce acidic byproducts, which can soften and slowly wear away at your enamel. Candy, especially sour candies, which are sugar-filled and acidic, are the least friendly combo for your teeth! But sugar doesn’t just hide in candy…Check your food labels on condiments, cereals, and other desserts and snacks for high amounts of added sugar (1, 2).

Sugary Beverages: Just like sugary foods, beverages can be a sneaky source of sugar and acid, ready to harm your enamel! Soda is especially bad, because not only is it sugary, it has additional acidic components. Coffee is high in acidity, and people often load it with syrups or sugars, too! Just imagine what happens if a highly acidic, sugary drink sits on your enamel for hours on end. Try cutting back on that cup of joe, or leaving out the sweetener. Frequent use of sports drinks in recent years, especially in children, has also been shown to harm enamel since the sugar sits on their teeth during activity, in many cases. Even fruit juices should be taken in moderation, because they are high in simple sugars and acid as well (1, 2, 6).enamel facts hagen dental

Foods that give you heartburn: Severe heartburn means stomach acid is moving up the esophagus. Those stomach acids that escape the stomach can reach your mouth and erode the enamel as well. So if you have certain foods that trigger heartburn, avoid them (1).

Ice: Simply put, ice is for chilling, not chewing! But isn’t water good for you? Yes! And ice is fine in your beverages – but avoid chewing on it! Chewing on hard substances such as ice can damage the enamel. The same is true for very hard candies that you crunch on (3, 6).

Citrus Fruit: Fruits are an excellent choice for incorporating more vitamins into your diet, especially the citrus variety. But heed this warning: frequent exposure to acidic foods, such as citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, limes and lemons, can erode your enamel over time. Your best bet? Eat these foods as part of a meal, rather than by themselves (3, 6).

Sticky Foods: Sticky foods, such as sticky candies, taffy, caramels, or even dried fruit such as raisins, can leave residue in your teeth, which means the sugar will sit on the enamel, leaving a food source for bacteria, which will in turn release enamel-damaging acid (2, 3, 6). Limit your intake of these foods to avoid potential damage to your enamel over time.

Starchy Foods: Starch-filled foods, such as potato chips, cookies, cakes, muffins and other starchy, processed snacks, tend to get trapped in your teeth. These starchy carbohydrates stay in your mouth and breakdown into sugar and acid more slowly, thus creating a longer period of sugar and acid threat to the teeth. Bacteria in your mouth love to feed on the left-behind sugars from these foods (3, 4, 6).

Protect Your Enamel

Analyze your diet over the next few weeks to discover which of these simple, daily changes you could make to ensure better health and protection for your enamel! Call Hagen Dental at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here to learn more.


Sources/References

  1. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-mouth-15/beautiful-smile/tooth-enamel-damage
  2. http://www.divinecaroline.com/self/wellness/mind-your-mouth-seven-foods-damage-tooth-enamel
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips/9-Foods-That-Damage-Your-Teeth/
  4. http://www.healingteethnaturally.com/foodstuffs-that-can-attack-teeth.html
  5. https://www.humana.com/learning-center/health-and-wellbeing/healthy-living/tooth-enamel
  6. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips

 

Your Child’s First Dental Visit: When Should It Be?

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

Did you know? While in previous years, we would have recommended children to have their first dental visit around age 3, we now advise parents to come visit us earlier than that age!

hagen dental dds

We now recommend bringing in your toddler at around 18 months. This is typically about the time when some, but not all, of their baby teeth are in!

Why The Change Now?

We like to see your children to make sure that everything in the mouth is normal! Most children’s baby teeth, also known as primary teeth or even milk teeth, come in with no problems, but sometimes lifestyle factors can affect the health of those teeth…

Let’s dig deeper!

More and more frequently in recent years, for a number of different reasons, the rate of tooth decay in young children is rapidly increasing.

In fact, in recent years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 42 percent of children, from age 2 to 11, have had cavities in their baby teeth. This high percentage of children with dental decay is much higher than in previous years.

family dentist in cincinnati

Why Is This Happening?

This rapid increase in early childhood caries – or ECC – is actually being called an “epidemic” because of just how prevalent it has now become. Early childhood caries (which in the past has also been called baby bottle tooth decay) can develop with infants or toddlers who go to sleep with a bottle in their mouth. Other children might get into the habit of walking around with a “sippy” cup or using a similar kind of cup, where they expose their teeth, for long periods of time, to sugary liquids or foods – such as sugary or starchy foods. That habit can also lead to decay, especially when it happens day after day.

hagen dental in cincinnatiAnother contributing factor is more widespread use of bottled water and the lack of fluoride. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay because it increases the rate of re-mineralization in the mouth and it slows down the breakdown of enamel in our children’s mouth as well.

Because many children are drinking more water without fluoride, they aren’t experiencing those same benefits.

As mentioned, historically, this kind of tooth decay was not present to the same degree, and therefore most dentists would recommend a child’s first dentist be around age 3. Now you can put a reminder on your calendar to be sure you come in and see us around 18 months!

Your Child’s First Visit to Dr. Hagen: Timing is Everything!

Before getting worried, remember that tooth decay is preventable and bringing in your child earlier to see us is also a key preventative measure you can take. Bringing your child into the dentist can make sure that children’s teeth are coming in as they should!

taking your child to the dentist cincinnati ohio

It’s also an opportunity to talk about any habits that the baby may have that could be contributing to tooth decay.

Clearly, a healthy mouth is something we all want for our kids. When we have a healthy mouth we promote the ability to chew properly, which in turn, impacts a child’s ability to maintain good nutrition. Healthy teeth from a young age also help encourage speech development, it ensures a space for permanent teeth, and it promotes confidence in the long-term.

Starting young helps promote a lifetime of healthy and bright smiles.

Be sure to bring your child in around 18 months so that we can examine their teeth and gums and help you know the proper oral hygiene methods and techniques for their oral health. Before then, be sure that you are giving your children nothing but water at bedtime so that you can avoid sugary liquids or carbohydrates being exposed to teeth all night long. 

Sources/References

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/03/02/cavities-children-teeth/5561911/

 

Gum Disease? Here’s What to Know About Scaling & Root Planing

Friday, May 27th, 2016

At any given time, we’re all developing some degree of plaque in our mouths. But when we brush, floss, and get regular dentist cleanings, we help to make sure it doesn’t become a problem.

So what is plaque?

Plaque is a biofilm, mostly made of bacteria, that adheres to the surface of our teeth. Plaque has an organized structure and its components – glycoproteins and polysaccharides – make it impossible to remove with water or by just using mouthwash.

In as little as a day, the biofilm that is in our mouth can transform from the soft and removable kind of plaque into a hard state – also called tartar – and that is much harder to remove.

The bacteria in dental plaque is what can lead to periodontal disease. (“Peri” means around, and “odontal” refers to our teeth.)

root planingOur bodies strive to get rid of the bacteria we have in our mouth, and therefore the cells of your immune system have an inflammatory reaction. This inflammatory reaction is how and why our gums then become swollen and can bleed. The more that nothing is done to fight off this bacteria, the more this can become a problem, and the more the bacteria will thrive.

And that’s where scaling & root planing come in…

Scalers are a tool that your dentist uses during – you guessed it – scaling and root planing. These are special tools that are used professionally in order to fight this bacteria build-up. The scaler can come in a couple of different sizes, but generally, it is a tool that is narrower at the tip. No matter what the tool looks like, they are simply specialized tools used to remove tartar and plaque.

scaling removes plaque

And what exactly does the scaling and root planing treatment involve?

The treatment works towards fighting periodontal disease – both on the teeth and the roots of your teeth. First, your teeth and gums are numbed so that all the plaque and tartar can be removed without any discomfort. Next, the professional tools are used to remove calculus. That may be by ultrasonic, sonic scaler, or power scaler.

After the bacteria is removed beneath the gum line, then teeth are smoothed and cleaned so that the gum tissue not only properly heals, but so it “reattaches” to your teeth. Part of the reason teeth can be smoothed is to get rid of surfaces and areas where bacteria are trapped or held – the same places where that bacteria would otherwise be much more likely to thrive. That’s also part of the treatment designed to get your gums back to their healthiest state.

Certain patients may have additional steps as part of their scaling and root planing treatment, depending on their vulnerability to gum disease and their medical history.

For example, there is ARESTIN®, which allows antibiotics to be slowly released over time in your mouth. Your dentist simply adds ARESTIN® to the your most vulnerable areas in the mouth – the pocket between your gum and tooth. This means that not only have you killed a great deal of bacteria during scaling and root planing, but you are now killing bacteria left behind after your procedure.

arestin hagen dental

Who benefits from scaling and root planing?

Your dentist will be able to recommend and tell you if you have periodontal disease, including any appropriate treatments – such as scaling and root planing – that can help you get back your healthy smile. Your dentist will not only take into account the current state of your teeth, but also your entire health history. Typically, if your dentist determines that you have gum disease that has progressed to a certain stage where bone loss is more likely to occur, he or she may recommend this kind of treatment.

Getting Your Teeth & Gums Feeling – and Looking – Healthy Again

Does your infection go away forever thanks to this treatment? The answer is that it is important to know that just because you have scaling and root planing, doesn’t meant you should go back to and bad oral health habits. Rather, the treatment is going to be maximized only if brushing, flossing and regular dentist visits (among other behaviors you want to avoid such as smoking) are kept up after your treatment. With that said, scaling and root planing does greatly support those looking to regain healthy-looking, firm gums.

In the end, the entire procedure can be done in an environment in which you are comfortable, and it can typically be done in a single visit. For some people, after the treatment, the mouth may be tender. In certain scenarios, the treatment can be broken into several visits when requested by a patient.

Want to learn more about scaling and root planing or ARESTIN®? Whether it is for a cosmetic consultation, scaling and root planing, or your regular visit, we’d love to see you. Read more about Dr. Hagen and the team, including our state-of-the-art dental methods and technologies, and give us a call today at (513) 251-5500.

keep up with oral habits hagen dental

Sources/References

Did You Know? 4 Facts About Hagen Dental Practice That Will Surprise You

Saturday, April 23rd, 2016

facts about hagen dental in cincinnati

You may think you know a lot about Hagen, but did you know these 4 things?

1. Hagen was the second dentist in Cincinnati to use the CEREC machine and terminology!

CEREC uses ceramic materials to restore any tooth that is decayed or broken, a procedure that can be done in just one-visit. What’s great is that it also preserves your tooth structure, and it lasts for a long, long, long time – if not forever.

But did you know that Dr. Hagen was one of the first to do this – in the region?

Assuming you are a candidate for a CEREC restoration, we examine a number of factors including the tooth itself, and the tissue around it. We then get an optical impression of the tooth. A reflective powder is applied to the tooth, and a picture is taken and viewed on our computer screen. That’s all done so we can make the perfect restoration!

Then we use our CEREC machine to create the restoration. After we have our 3-dimensional, virtual model of the tooth, Dr. Hagen designs the custom-fit restoration you’ll eventually have inside your mouth. That means that – as you might have guessed by now – we’ve been doing a form of 3D printing, right in our office, for years!

Next Dr. Hagen will bond the crown to the remaining tooth structure. This ceramic, tooth-colored restoration is not only cut out and shaped perfectly but we make sure you have a proper fit and a comfortable bite when it’s in your mouth. Not only has Dr. Hagen been doing one-visit CEREC crowns for years, but he was one of the first to even call it by that name.

CEREC technology _dentist offerings

2. Hagen Dental Practice has 202 combined years of experience across our staff.

If you’ve been to Hagen Dental Practice, you know we do everything we can to make sure you are as comfortable as possible. We keep you smiling – not just with our excellent treatment, but with the unusually friendly and caring manner with which care is provided.

But did you know that our team has 202+ combined years of experience? We want our team members to be both technically competent and personally warm, and we feel fortunate to have found such people! See the team on our website here.

serving patients for more than 200 years3. Hagen Dental Practice offers Snap-On Smile™.

Snap-On Smile™ brings you an affordable, pain-free, non-invasive cosmetic way to get a beautiful smile.

Looking to close a gap you have in your teeth? Or maybe you are looking to cover your existing crooked teeth? Another way that Hagen Dental Practice is leading the way is with the ability to get a smile makeover in our office. With Snap-On Smile™, there is no drilling or extractions necessary. Let’s explore further.

Once we know if you are a candidate, we talk aesthetics. Then, a pain-free impression of your teeth is made, and on your next visit with Hagen, you will have your new smile fitting!

The fitting is just what it sounds like: we make sure that your new smile fits just as it should, and you get to walk out with your beautiful smile! Your smile makeover can be just that easy and quick, and your fitting can last as long as 5 years. That’s right: Snap-On Smile™ requires no shots and no drilling! Ask us for more information if you’d like to learn more about this life-changing solution.

4. Hagen Dental Practice’s patients’ ages range from 3 to 100.

When you come in to Hagen Dental Practice, a hygienist professionally cleans your teeth, helping to keep your teeth free of cavities and your gums free of bacteria. In turn, this lessen the risk of serious health conditions.

On your own, regular brushing helps combat plaque and tartar build-up, but that’s also what we look to remove when you come in to see us. Regular cleanings keep serious problems from developing and they help you keep your natural teeth for a lifetime. Just ask any of our patients – which certainly range from brand new teeth to teeth that have lasted for decades!

Speaking of teeth that last for a lifetime, did you know that Hagen Dental Practice’s patients range from 3 to 100 years old?
We are proud to be able to offer services to children at their first visit and to 100 and beyond!

Your Family Will Love Our Friendly & Relaxed Office

No matter your age, we’d love to come see you! After all, you and your entire family deserve a healthy smile that can last a lifetime. If you are thinking about bringing the younger kids in, know that we can relieve fears in children of all ages and put them at ease for every visit. Whether it is for a cosmetic consultation or for your regular visit, we’d love to see you. Read more about Dr. Hagen and the team, including our state-of-the-art dental methods and technologies, and then give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your children.

 

Why Does My Dentist Need to Know If I Have Diabetes?

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

diabetes and your smile and oral health

When you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop problems in your mouth, and you also less equipped to heal after dental surgery.

And, according to the American Diabetes Association, the most common problem affecting gums and teeth for people with diabetes is gum disease.

Think of your dentist as someone who is an advocate for your total health and well-being.

If we don’t know you are living with diabetes, we aren’t knowledgeable about the state of your health, and we may not be able to be as proactive in contributing to your treatment strategy.

Because diabetes makes you prone to other mouth problems – not “just” gum disease – if we know your health status, we are able to ensure that you are taking all the steps to best manage your blood sugar. Additionally, there are medications that can result in drastic and impactful changes in the mouth.

For instance, certain medications can drastically reduce the amount of saliva you have in your mouth, which can greatly impact your ability to “naturally” cleanse your teeth. As a result, we can see a drastic, and immediate change in the amount of harmful bacteria (and plaque) in your mouth – if you were to do nothing to manage this change in the mouth. All of this can happen relatively quickly, but with greater communication around your medications, we can come up with a strategy and plan to encourage a healthy mouth.

All in all, when we know the medications you’re taking, we’re better equipped to give you recommendations that take your entire health into account.

medication and diabetes

Mouth Problems: What to Know

In an ideal situation, we have a plan, and we manage our blood sugar levels, stay on a healthy nutrition plan, and continue daily, good oral health habits. If we also see a dentist regularly we can prevent problems, but if a problem occurs, we can catch it early!

When we have poor blood sugar control, we see an increase in the risk for gum problems. Just like with other infections, gum disease can cause our blood sugar to rise. And then, as a result, diabetes can be harder to manage because you are less able to fight bacteria and even more susceptible to infections.

If Our Blood Sugar is Uncontrolled…

If our blood sugar becomes uncontrolled, we may experience dry mouth and bad breath. What’s worse is that we can end up with thrush, inflammation in our gums and infections in the mouth.

Warning signs that you have an oral infection include:

  • Swelling or pus around the teeth or gums – even if small
  • Pain in your mouth that doesn’t go away
  • Pain when chewing
  • Dark spots in your teeth
  • The appearance of holes in your teeth
  • White or red patches on your gum tissue or anywhere in the mouth

Call us if you have diabetes and any of the signs or symptoms listed above.

Keep Taking Care of Your Teeth

The Canadian Diabetes Association says that, “Because periodontal disease is an infection, bacteria produce toxins that affect the carbohydrate metabolism in individual cells. It is also thought that the host response to periodontal bacteria can increase insulin resistance and, therefore, blood glucose levels.” Said another way, there is evidence to suggest (although cause and effect is not quite determined) that there is a two-way link between the state of your mouth and your management of diabetes (1).

If anything, this assertion just reinforces the idea that we have to be proactive in taking care of our mouths. Step one? Telling your dentist this major lifestyle change – that way we can work together to reduce your risk of complications and prevent gum and mouth infections or gum disease.

keep your teeth healthy

We Support Your Entire Health: Give Hagen Dental a Call Today

We want you to help you manage your diabetes – in a way that is as comfortable as possible. We’re here to partner with you so you can improve your total health.

Have questions? We’d love to answer them. Hagen Dental is supportive no matter where you are on your health journey. Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/5-reasons-why-oral-care-matters/
  2. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/more-on-the-mouth.html
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/diabetes

How Bad Is It to Go to Sleep Without Brushing Your Teeth?

Monday, March 21st, 2016

hagen dentalTypically most of us eat dinner at night. Just like with any other meal or snack, when we eat, the bacteria in our mouth have an opportunity to thrive. Sound gross?

Well—it doesn’t end there!

These bacteria thrive off the food particles that enter out mouth, and they then create an acid as a byproduct of feasting on the food we just ate. That acid is what breaks down our tooth enamel. Eventually, this is what causes decay and cavities.

Let’s say that you brush and floss after eating a meal, including after dinner before you go to bed. When we brush the right way, you interrupt that process from happening: in just two to three minutes of brushing, followed by flossing, you help prevent that build-up of bacteria.

You also help encourage the turnover of microbes on your teeth when you brush. This in turn means you reduce the tartar and the plaque build-up in your mouth. Another benefit? Brushing before bed is also another habit that can signal to our body that it’s time to get ready, unwind and go to bed!

If Fresh Breath & A Beautiful Smile Isn’t Enough to Motivate You…

So how bad is it if you don’t brush your teeth before going to sleep?

oral bacteria healthIf you don’t brush after a meal, and then head to bed, you contribute to a less healthy oral environment. Specifically, you are letting a lot of bacteria grow without interruption! You are also letting the plaque “sit” and harden on your teeth.

Over time, we get plaque on our teeth, and when it’s calcified (hardened) that makes it extremely difficult to remove and get rid of. Being that we have less saliva in our mouths at night, which helps naturally “swift away” food particles and bacteria, this can further accelerate the growth of bacteria.

From there, the plaque can continue to build-up in our mouth, resulting in a greater number of bacteria communities that may be thriving and doing harm to our oral health. Just imagine: bacteria in our mouth are always attempting to grow. All our daily habits can either work against this process—and work to reduce the bacteria that is present—or they can support the growth of the bacteria.

The good news it that this is part of why you regularly see us: we have the instruments and tools to remove your plaque build-up during your regular teeth cleaning. With that said, just think of how long that plaque can sit and get worse on your teeth in-between visits! 

But That’s Not All…

This plaque build-up is bad for your gum and teeth, but it can also signal to the body that you have an infection. This kind of inflammatory response that can come before or during the stages of gum disease keeps our immune system fighting off what it believes is something that is threating our body. In this process, our body is “attacking” our gum, hoping to protect our tissue.

This inflammatory response can result in our tissue being damaged or destroyed. When people see their gum line pulling away from the tooth, for example, this is often what has taken place.

Gum disease, inflammation and the repercussions of inflammation in our body is not something that would happen after just one night in which we fall asleep without brushing our teeth. But just like all our oral health habits, it comes down to the kind of habits we adopt over time.

teeth brushing

Fight an Elevated Oral Bacteria Count & Keep Your Smile Healthy

As you get ready for bed this week, put a priority on making sure you brush and floss. If you’re someone who often gets tired quickly, and then you end up accidentally falling asleep before brushing your teeth, change your habits so that you brush your teeth closer to finishing dinner. Your future, healthy mouth will thank you!

As little as three minutes can keep your teeth and gums healthy for the long run. It can help reduce future pain that could be associated with sensitive gum lines or cavities, and it can keep your smiling looking great. Help fight bad breath and help combat other diseases by taking time out to brush your teeth and floss before heading off to bed tonight.

Want to Setup an Appointment with Hagen Dental?
 

First, don’t forget to make brushing and flossing a part of your daily routine. If you are looking for a deep clean to get rid of the plaque build-up in your mouth, give Hagen a call today at 513.251.5500. Your teeth will feel great when you leave Hagen Dental. We have many options to help you achieve the smile of your dreams and we can’t wait to meet you.