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Posts Tagged ‘Hagen DDS’

9 Dental Myths That People Still Believe

Monday, July 25th, 2016

9 Dental Myths That People Still BelieveYou hear a variety of things all the time about your oral health – from friends, your family, the media, from advertisements, and more…so how do you know what to believe and what to ignore? Finally, here are answers to your questions! In this post, we separate fact from fiction and drill down on those dental myths.

Myth #1: Brushing and flossing extra well before your dental appointment will hide the fact that you haven’t been keeping up with your regular brushing and flossing habits.

Ramping up your brushing and flossing a few days before you visit the dentist doesn’t mean you can “undo” the months where your oral hygiene habits were lacking! In fact, adding in extra oral hygiene after letting it go for a while has the potential to actually inflame your gums, making them swollen, red and more likely to bleed.

Your dentist will know your secret! There’s nothing that can substitute for regular care in between your dental visits. (1).

Myth #2: If your gums bleed, you should stop brushing and flossing.

It turns out, the opposite is true: you don’t want to stop brushing or flossing if you notice your gum is bleeding or irritated! Plaque build-up and food debris on the teeth are the culprits behind gum bleeding. Regular brushing and flossing is the best way to remove plaque build-up and food from the mouth. If the plaque build-up is too severe, getting a dental cleaning is the best choice to get the problem under control (1, 2). If your gum is bleeding abnormally or doesn’t stop, you want to let us know, too.

myth bustingMyth #3: Brushing MORE will always improve the health of your teeth.

More is not better in this case—especially if you tend to brush too hard. Over-brushing your teeth can wear the enamel down due to the abrasive properties of your toothpaste. Rinsing your mouth out after eating is a safe alternative to extra brushing sessions. Using a soft bristled brush also helps avoid problems from those prone to brushing too hard (1, 2).

Myth #4: Babies don’t need to go to the dentist.

We now recommend bringing in your toddler at around 18 months. This is typically about the time when some, but not all, of their baby teeth are in. The checkup will also allow you to ask questions and get any advice on how you can continue to promote a healthy dental routine for your baby—for life!

Myth #5: Dental treatment and visits to the dentist should be avoided during pregnancy.

Very false! During pregnancy, blood flow, hormones, and often a woman’s diet will change. This can cause an increase in bacteria in your mouth, which leads to an increased likelihood for dental issues such as gingivitis, bleeding gums, or development of cavities over the course of the pregnancy.

Be sure to keep that dental check-up during pregnancy! X-rays will likely be avoided, unless absolutely necessary, but many dental procedures, including cleanings are completely safe for pregnant women and can help prevent inflammation. It’s also very important to maintain good oral health to avoid adverse effects on your developing baby (1, 5).

Myth #6: If there is no visible issue in your mouth, you don’t need to see your dentist.

Just because you can’t see a problem, doesn’t mean you should skip your regular dental checkup. Your dental cleanings and exams each year help ensure your teeth STAY healthy! It’s also important to find any dental problems early so they don’t become serious (2). Don’t forget that your dentist visit also includes oral cancer screenings, too.

Myth #7: Teeth whitening will damage your enamel.

New technology has made teeth whitening much safer! (Zoom! Whitening, anyone?) You can stick with professional whitening for the safest options, and ask us any questions you have about the process (2)!

Myth #8: Losing baby teeth to tooth decay is okay – that’s what adult teeth are for, right?

False! Losing a baby tooth to tooth decay is not insignificant. This can result in damage to the developing crowns of the permanent teeth just below the baby tooth. It could also mean the child is not developing proper dietary and dental health habits to promote healthy teeth down the line (3).

Myth #9: You’ll know when you have a cavity.

Sometimes you’ll know when you have a cavity or an issue of some kind…but many times you won’t! And by the time you can feel the discomfort of a cavity, it has probably spread to a larger area than it would have if it had been caught at a regular dental cleaning and examination (4).

Have More Questions About Your Dental Health? We Can’t Wait to Meet You & Your Family

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

Sources

  1. http://www.stlawrencedentistry.com/top-10-dental-myths/
  2. http://www.1800dentist.com/dental-myths-separating-fact-from-fiction-finally/
  3. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100805103926.htm
  4. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/cavities-myths
  5. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-care-pregnancy

 

Foods (And Drinks) That Damage Your Enamel

Friday, July 15th, 2016

Did you know? Your tooth enamel health is directly related to what you are eating, including those beverages you are drinking!

Keeping your teeth healthy involves more than just brushing and flossing.

foods and drinks that can damage your enamel hagen dental

Your enamel is the hard outer layer of your teeth. In fact, it’s the hardest substance in the human body—and for good reason! This surface layer helps protect the sensitive inner parts of the tooth from decay and damage. However, even enamel is subject to harm if not treated well. It is normal for some wear and tear to occur, but by focusing on what you are feeding your body (and thus putting into your mouth) you can keep that outer barrier of your teeth stronger (5).

Maintain the Health of Your Enamel

Here are some foods to avoid or minimize for optimum enamel health:

Sugary Foods: Increased sugars feed bacteria in your mouth. Left unchecked, these bacteria produce acidic byproducts, which can soften and slowly wear away at your enamel. Candy, especially sour candies, which are sugar-filled and acidic, are the least friendly combo for your teeth! But sugar doesn’t just hide in candy…Check your food labels on condiments, cereals, and other desserts and snacks for high amounts of added sugar (1, 2).

Sugary Beverages: Just like sugary foods, beverages can be a sneaky source of sugar and acid, ready to harm your enamel! Soda is especially bad, because not only is it sugary, it has additional acidic components. Coffee is high in acidity, and people often load it with syrups or sugars, too! Just imagine what happens if a highly acidic, sugary drink sits on your enamel for hours on end. Try cutting back on that cup of joe, or leaving out the sweetener. Frequent use of sports drinks in recent years, especially in children, has also been shown to harm enamel since the sugar sits on their teeth during activity, in many cases. Even fruit juices should be taken in moderation, because they are high in simple sugars and acid as well (1, 2, 6).enamel facts hagen dental

Foods that give you heartburn: Severe heartburn means stomach acid is moving up the esophagus. Those stomach acids that escape the stomach can reach your mouth and erode the enamel as well. So if you have certain foods that trigger heartburn, avoid them (1).

Ice: Simply put, ice is for chilling, not chewing! But isn’t water good for you? Yes! And ice is fine in your beverages – but avoid chewing on it! Chewing on hard substances such as ice can damage the enamel. The same is true for very hard candies that you crunch on (3, 6).

Citrus Fruit: Fruits are an excellent choice for incorporating more vitamins into your diet, especially the citrus variety. But heed this warning: frequent exposure to acidic foods, such as citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, limes and lemons, can erode your enamel over time. Your best bet? Eat these foods as part of a meal, rather than by themselves (3, 6).

Sticky Foods: Sticky foods, such as sticky candies, taffy, caramels, or even dried fruit such as raisins, can leave residue in your teeth, which means the sugar will sit on the enamel, leaving a food source for bacteria, which will in turn release enamel-damaging acid (2, 3, 6). Limit your intake of these foods to avoid potential damage to your enamel over time.

Starchy Foods: Starch-filled foods, such as potato chips, cookies, cakes, muffins and other starchy, processed snacks, tend to get trapped in your teeth. These starchy carbohydrates stay in your mouth and breakdown into sugar and acid more slowly, thus creating a longer period of sugar and acid threat to the teeth. Bacteria in your mouth love to feed on the left-behind sugars from these foods (3, 4, 6).

Protect Your Enamel

Analyze your diet over the next few weeks to discover which of these simple, daily changes you could make to ensure better health and protection for your enamel! Call Hagen Dental at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here to learn more.


Sources/References

  1. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-mouth-15/beautiful-smile/tooth-enamel-damage
  2. http://www.divinecaroline.com/self/wellness/mind-your-mouth-seven-foods-damage-tooth-enamel
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips/9-Foods-That-Damage-Your-Teeth/
  4. http://www.healingteethnaturally.com/foodstuffs-that-can-attack-teeth.html
  5. https://www.humana.com/learning-center/health-and-wellbeing/healthy-living/tooth-enamel
  6. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips

 

Your Child’s First Dental Visit: When Should It Be?

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

Did you know? While in previous years, we would have recommended children to have their first dental visit around age 3, we now advise parents to come visit us earlier than that age!

hagen dental dds

We now recommend bringing in your toddler at around 18 months. This is typically about the time when some, but not all, of their baby teeth are in!

Why The Change Now?

We like to see your children to make sure that everything in the mouth is normal! Most children’s baby teeth, also known as primary teeth or even milk teeth, come in with no problems, but sometimes lifestyle factors can affect the health of those teeth…

Let’s dig deeper!

More and more frequently in recent years, for a number of different reasons, the rate of tooth decay in young children is rapidly increasing.

In fact, in recent years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 42 percent of children, from age 2 to 11, have had cavities in their baby teeth. This high percentage of children with dental decay is much higher than in previous years.

family dentist in cincinnati

Why Is This Happening?

This rapid increase in early childhood caries – or ECC – is actually being called an “epidemic” because of just how prevalent it has now become. Early childhood caries (which in the past has also been called baby bottle tooth decay) can develop with infants or toddlers who go to sleep with a bottle in their mouth. Other children might get into the habit of walking around with a “sippy” cup or using a similar kind of cup, where they expose their teeth, for long periods of time, to sugary liquids or foods – such as sugary or starchy foods. That habit can also lead to decay, especially when it happens day after day.

hagen dental in cincinnatiAnother contributing factor is more widespread use of bottled water and the lack of fluoride. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay because it increases the rate of re-mineralization in the mouth and it slows down the breakdown of enamel in our children’s mouth as well.

Because many children are drinking more water without fluoride, they aren’t experiencing those same benefits.

As mentioned, historically, this kind of tooth decay was not present to the same degree, and therefore most dentists would recommend a child’s first dentist be around age 3. Now you can put a reminder on your calendar to be sure you come in and see us around 18 months!

Your Child’s First Visit to Dr. Hagen: Timing is Everything!

Before getting worried, remember that tooth decay is preventable and bringing in your child earlier to see us is also a key preventative measure you can take. Bringing your child into the dentist can make sure that children’s teeth are coming in as they should!

taking your child to the dentist cincinnati ohio

It’s also an opportunity to talk about any habits that the baby may have that could be contributing to tooth decay.

Clearly, a healthy mouth is something we all want for our kids. When we have a healthy mouth we promote the ability to chew properly, which in turn, impacts a child’s ability to maintain good nutrition. Healthy teeth from a young age also help encourage speech development, it ensures a space for permanent teeth, and it promotes confidence in the long-term.

Starting young helps promote a lifetime of healthy and bright smiles.

Be sure to bring your child in around 18 months so that we can examine their teeth and gums and help you know the proper oral hygiene methods and techniques for their oral health. Before then, be sure that you are giving your children nothing but water at bedtime so that you can avoid sugary liquids or carbohydrates being exposed to teeth all night long. 

Sources/References

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/03/02/cavities-children-teeth/5561911/

 

What to Know About Composite Fillings

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

what to know about composite fillings

What happens when you visit the dentist for a filling?

To start, often times you may be given local anesthesia so that the area can be numbed. Generally, the next step will be to remove the decay from your actual tooth!

During this stage a drill or a laser may be used. Once this decay is removed, it’s time to shape the space and prepare it for your filling.

Depending on the filling, the preparation will vary. There are many options available today for fillings, with the most common including gold, porcelain, silver amalgam, glass ionomer, zinc oxide and eugenol, composite resin fillings.

Composite Resin Fillings

So what are composite resin fillings – and why is it called “composite resin”?

It’s referred to as composite resin because the material consists of a combination of glass and tooth-colored plastic and other materials. Composite fillings are commonly used to reshape disfigured teeth in the mouth or as a material to bond to your teeth – with the benefit being that they can match the exact color of your existing teeth.

Because composites can bond to your teeth, they can help support your remaining tooth structure, which can help prevent further breakage on teeth. It can also be used as a “buffer” on the tooth, serving to insulate your tooth from temperature change. People like composite resin fillings because they can look so natural in the mouth.

composite fillings hagen dental cincinnati dentist

But back to the process of getting a filling: at this stage, depending on the kind of filling, sometimes a base is placed to protect your nerves. Often times that is made of composite resin!

After a few more steps, certain fillings will be hardened using light applied to the area. Once the material has hardened, you’re almost ready to go. After shaping and polishing, your composite is placed.

cosmetic dentistrySo how do you know what kind of filling is right for you?

There are many factors that help your dentist know what kind of filling is right for you. These factors include:

  • The size of the decay
  • The location of the decay in the mouth
  • Aesthetics
  • Bonding to your tooth structure
  • Versatility (for example, if used for broken or chipped teeth)
  • Other health and lifestyle factors

From simple fillings to full crowns to veneers, CEREC is also an option that many people turn to – again – depending on the specific needs of the situation. Keep in mind we can help you decide what’s best for you based on the extent of the decay, aesthetics, durability, your insurance, and of course how the option is suited for your mouth.

Before you have the need for any fillings, aim for prevention. Brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss every day and visit Dr. Hagen regularly.

natural looking fillings cincinnati dentist

Sources/References

Gum Disease? Here’s What to Know About Scaling & Root Planing

Friday, May 27th, 2016

At any given time, we’re all developing some degree of plaque in our mouths. But when we brush, floss, and get regular dentist cleanings, we help to make sure it doesn’t become a problem.

So what is plaque?

Plaque is a biofilm, mostly made of bacteria, that adheres to the surface of our teeth. Plaque has an organized structure and its components – glycoproteins and polysaccharides – make it impossible to remove with water or by just using mouthwash.

In as little as a day, the biofilm that is in our mouth can transform from the soft and removable kind of plaque into a hard state – also called tartar – and that is much harder to remove.

The bacteria in dental plaque is what can lead to periodontal disease. (“Peri” means around, and “odontal” refers to our teeth.)

root planingOur bodies strive to get rid of the bacteria we have in our mouth, and therefore the cells of your immune system have an inflammatory reaction. This inflammatory reaction is how and why our gums then become swollen and can bleed. The more that nothing is done to fight off this bacteria, the more this can become a problem, and the more the bacteria will thrive.

And that’s where scaling & root planing come in…

Scalers are a tool that your dentist uses during – you guessed it – scaling and root planing. These are special tools that are used professionally in order to fight this bacteria build-up. The scaler can come in a couple of different sizes, but generally, it is a tool that is narrower at the tip. No matter what the tool looks like, they are simply specialized tools used to remove tartar and plaque.

scaling removes plaque

And what exactly does the scaling and root planing treatment involve?

The treatment works towards fighting periodontal disease – both on the teeth and the roots of your teeth. First, your teeth and gums are numbed so that all the plaque and tartar can be removed without any discomfort. Next, the professional tools are used to remove calculus. That may be by ultrasonic, sonic scaler, or power scaler.

After the bacteria is removed beneath the gum line, then teeth are smoothed and cleaned so that the gum tissue not only properly heals, but so it “reattaches” to your teeth. Part of the reason teeth can be smoothed is to get rid of surfaces and areas where bacteria are trapped or held – the same places where that bacteria would otherwise be much more likely to thrive. That’s also part of the treatment designed to get your gums back to their healthiest state.

Certain patients may have additional steps as part of their scaling and root planing treatment, depending on their vulnerability to gum disease and their medical history.

For example, there is ARESTIN®, which allows antibiotics to be slowly released over time in your mouth. Your dentist simply adds ARESTIN® to the your most vulnerable areas in the mouth – the pocket between your gum and tooth. This means that not only have you killed a great deal of bacteria during scaling and root planing, but you are now killing bacteria left behind after your procedure.

arestin hagen dental

Who benefits from scaling and root planing?

Your dentist will be able to recommend and tell you if you have periodontal disease, including any appropriate treatments – such as scaling and root planing – that can help you get back your healthy smile. Your dentist will not only take into account the current state of your teeth, but also your entire health history. Typically, if your dentist determines that you have gum disease that has progressed to a certain stage where bone loss is more likely to occur, he or she may recommend this kind of treatment.

Getting Your Teeth & Gums Feeling – and Looking – Healthy Again

Does your infection go away forever thanks to this treatment? The answer is that it is important to know that just because you have scaling and root planing, doesn’t meant you should go back to and bad oral health habits. Rather, the treatment is going to be maximized only if brushing, flossing and regular dentist visits (among other behaviors you want to avoid such as smoking) are kept up after your treatment. With that said, scaling and root planing does greatly support those looking to regain healthy-looking, firm gums.

In the end, the entire procedure can be done in an environment in which you are comfortable, and it can typically be done in a single visit. For some people, after the treatment, the mouth may be tender. In certain scenarios, the treatment can be broken into several visits when requested by a patient.

Want to learn more about scaling and root planing or ARESTIN®? Whether it is for a cosmetic consultation, scaling and root planing, or your regular visit, we’d love to see you. Read more about Dr. Hagen and the team, including our state-of-the-art dental methods and technologies, and give us a call today at (513) 251-5500.

keep up with oral habits hagen dental

Sources/References

Do You Have Your Custom Mouth Guard Yet?

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Spring has sprung and that means we are back outdoors and back into sports seasons including baseball, lacrosse, field hockey, soccer and more.

As we head back outdoors – and even for indoor sports – it’s time to consider getting a custom-fit mouth guard.

hagen dds

Did you know that the great majority of high school athletes – about 3 out of 4 – dental injuries that happen during sports occur in people who aren’t wearing a mouth guard? (Source.) Just think if those athletes had been wearing a protective mouth guard! You can see why some states are now mandating athletes in high school wear mouth guards. 

A Small Habit That Helps Us Avoid Major Damage

Athletic mouth guards absorb shock that you can get while playing sports, whether it be an elbow to the face, a ball, or because of an accidental collision. That means, if we are wearing a mouth guard, that the shock your teeth and jaw would normally receive is less damaging to the mouth.

Wearing a mouth guard can save your teeth – both teeth loss and cracks, prevent major damage to your jaw and face, and it’s an easy habit once you start doing it. If kids are still resistant to the idea, be sure to let them know that these injuries will sideline them for quite some time. In other words, wearing a properly fitting mouth guard can help them stay out on the field!

For many sports – not just contact sports – we also see that mouth guards protect us against the following:

  • Dental fractures
  • Lacerations of lips, tongue, and cheeks
  • Avulsions
  • Luxations (joint dislocation, in this case, the jaw)
  • Concussions

The benefit of a mouth guard we make you is that it will fit just right (you don’t want it to be too loose, and it CAN be comfortable!), it will still allow you to speak, and perhaps most importantly, you will be able to breathe properly.

Tim Hardaway Jr., Mason Plumlee, Matthew Dellavedova, Amir Johnson, Blake Griffin, Cole Aldrich, Rajon Rondo, Alan Anderson, and even Stephen Curry – who has a habit of playing with his mouth guard at times – are just a few pro athletes who regularly wear their mouth guards.

LeBron James is another advocate of wearing a mouth guards. He’s even worn a mouth guard habitually since high school. In fact, these pro athletes think of mouth guards as just another part of their uniform.

hagen dental

I’m Convinced. So How Do I Care for My Mouth Guard?

Now that you’re convinced you want to wear a mouth guard to protect your soft tissue, tongue, mouth, jaw and lips – the question is, how do I take care of my custom mouth guard?

First, when you wear your mouth guard made at Hagen Dental, be sure not to just wear it during games or competitions – you want to get into the habit of wearing it all the time, even at practice. That’s because injuries to the face, mouth and jaw are just as likely to happen in a game as at practice or during “unorganized” sports activities. By wearing it all times, you’re protecting your mouth as much as you can.

You will also want to check it at least once a year to make sure it still fits properly. Next, when storing it, be sure to clean it as much as possible – meaning after every use – and keep it away from heat. Yes, that means throwing it in your sports bag and letting it sit in the summer heat in your car is not a great idea!

lawrence hagen custom mouth guards

Good Dental Hygiene Habits Include Wearing a Custom Mouth Guard

If you have specific questions about how your mouth guard will work with your retainer or braces, let us know. Ready to get your custom-made mouth guard? Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your children!

Why Does My Dentist Need to Know If I Have Diabetes?

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

diabetes and your smile and oral health

When you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop problems in your mouth, and you also less equipped to heal after dental surgery.

And, according to the American Diabetes Association, the most common problem affecting gums and teeth for people with diabetes is gum disease.

Think of your dentist as someone who is an advocate for your total health and well-being.

If we don’t know you are living with diabetes, we aren’t knowledgeable about the state of your health, and we may not be able to be as proactive in contributing to your treatment strategy.

Because diabetes makes you prone to other mouth problems – not “just” gum disease – if we know your health status, we are able to ensure that you are taking all the steps to best manage your blood sugar. Additionally, there are medications that can result in drastic and impactful changes in the mouth.

For instance, certain medications can drastically reduce the amount of saliva you have in your mouth, which can greatly impact your ability to “naturally” cleanse your teeth. As a result, we can see a drastic, and immediate change in the amount of harmful bacteria (and plaque) in your mouth – if you were to do nothing to manage this change in the mouth. All of this can happen relatively quickly, but with greater communication around your medications, we can come up with a strategy and plan to encourage a healthy mouth.

All in all, when we know the medications you’re taking, we’re better equipped to give you recommendations that take your entire health into account.

medication and diabetes

Mouth Problems: What to Know

In an ideal situation, we have a plan, and we manage our blood sugar levels, stay on a healthy nutrition plan, and continue daily, good oral health habits. If we also see a dentist regularly we can prevent problems, but if a problem occurs, we can catch it early!

When we have poor blood sugar control, we see an increase in the risk for gum problems. Just like with other infections, gum disease can cause our blood sugar to rise. And then, as a result, diabetes can be harder to manage because you are less able to fight bacteria and even more susceptible to infections.

If Our Blood Sugar is Uncontrolled…

If our blood sugar becomes uncontrolled, we may experience dry mouth and bad breath. What’s worse is that we can end up with thrush, inflammation in our gums and infections in the mouth.

Warning signs that you have an oral infection include:

  • Swelling or pus around the teeth or gums – even if small
  • Pain in your mouth that doesn’t go away
  • Pain when chewing
  • Dark spots in your teeth
  • The appearance of holes in your teeth
  • White or red patches on your gum tissue or anywhere in the mouth

Call us if you have diabetes and any of the signs or symptoms listed above.

Keep Taking Care of Your Teeth

The Canadian Diabetes Association says that, “Because periodontal disease is an infection, bacteria produce toxins that affect the carbohydrate metabolism in individual cells. It is also thought that the host response to periodontal bacteria can increase insulin resistance and, therefore, blood glucose levels.” Said another way, there is evidence to suggest (although cause and effect is not quite determined) that there is a two-way link between the state of your mouth and your management of diabetes (1).

If anything, this assertion just reinforces the idea that we have to be proactive in taking care of our mouths. Step one? Telling your dentist this major lifestyle change – that way we can work together to reduce your risk of complications and prevent gum and mouth infections or gum disease.

keep your teeth healthy

We Support Your Entire Health: Give Hagen Dental a Call Today

We want you to help you manage your diabetes – in a way that is as comfortable as possible. We’re here to partner with you so you can improve your total health.

Have questions? We’d love to answer them. Hagen Dental is supportive no matter where you are on your health journey. Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/5-reasons-why-oral-care-matters/
  2. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/more-on-the-mouth.html
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/diabetes

4 Things You Didn’t Know About Hagen Dental Practice

Sunday, February 21st, 2016

Think you know everything about Hagen Dental?

Think again! Here are 4 things you might not have known about Hagen Dental Practice.

1. Dr. Hagen Can Help You Sleep better!

Did you know that a custom-fit, oral appliance could greatly improve snoring and obstructive sleep apnea?

It may be you – or even your spouse or child – who suffers from snoring, sleep apnea, or a combination of both, as many people do. As recommended by The American Academy of Sleep Medicine, these custom oral devices are a treatment that can greatly improve the quality of our sleep, and our life!

Improve your sleep and gain back all the benefits that come with greater quality of sleep by coming in to see us to see if you are a candidate for this treatment.

We first diagnose and assess the severity of your sleep apnea. After we take a look at your symptoms as well as risk factors, we can construct the appropriate sleep appliance that is best fit for you.

Keep in mind this is a non-invasive way to improve your lifestyle: it is easy to wear, easy to take care of, it is quiet, you can wear it anywhere, it is convenient and it is affordable! We see that as much as 90 percent of those who use the sleep appliance have successful improvement in the problems associated with sleep apnea.

Rest easy: not only can we help you have a beautiful smile, but we can help you feel like a whole new person thanks to improved quality of sleep!

hagen dental practice sleep apnea

2. Our Goal is All About your Entire Health & Well-Being—which is Why We Value Earning Your Trust.

At Hagen Dental Practice, our first goal, from the moment you walk in the door, is to earn a feeling of trust.

We know it is critical to have trust with so that you can feel great about the decisions you make regarding your health. We believe the absolute best dentistry we can provide takes place when we have that trust. We’re all working together toward the common goals of healthy teeth and gums and a beautiful smile.

Certain people have apprehension or worries about visiting the dentist, and the most important thing we can do first is to listen to our patients. Our environment is always comforting and our patients know they come to Hagen Dental and be treated with compassion and understanding.

hagen dental practice in cincinnati ohio

3. Hagen Dental Offers Pain-Free Smile Makeovers.

You may know how we have the latest and greatest when it comes to dentistry—whether it is children’s, cosmetic, family, general, implant, preventive, restorative and sedation dentistry….we take pride in being able to offer you technology, experience, and expertise!

We find that many people want to greatly enhance or improve their smile, but also they want to have a natural look. For those looking for a “smile makeover,” Hagen Dental is your premier destination to do just that…and it can be a pain-free process.

Our goal is that you have confidence when you smile, meet new people, or just when you go to eat—and with our pain-free smile makeovers, this is possible.

That’s why we offer the Snap-On Smile™, which is a removable, cosmetic dental appliance that has been custom-made for your smile. We also work to make sure it fits with your overall facial structure. Snap-On Smile™ is a strong, thin material (specifically, hi-tech dental resin) and it fits directly over your existing teeth.

With Snap-On Smile™, you can get a new, natural-looking smile with no drills, no cutting down of your current teeth, no glue or adhesives, no needles, and if you want to remove it, you can at any time. We’ve used it with people who have dental fears, those who don’t want veneers or want to try these before veneers, and for people with discoloration, stains, gaps in their teeth, and/or missing teeth. Ask us for more information if you’d like to learn more.

4. We Promote (and Live) a Healthy Lifestyle.

Part of total health is going to your dentist regularly and having good daily oral health habits, but part of it is also eating nutritious foods that make us feel great. We approach “total health” as lifestyle decisions or habits that promote our quality of life—behaviors and decisions that set us up for longevity! Another part of this idea of total health is getting enough sleep, and part of total health is of course getting physical activity.

At Hagen Dental, we encourage physical training of some kind, given that it can help us control weight, keeps us in shape, combats disease, boosts energy, promotes sleep, and it can also improve our confidence and sense of well-being.

The Hagen family is often in-training and regularly exercises: in fact, Dr. Hagen is a regular cyclist, and Jenny is an avid runner! Did you know that Dr. Hagen has been riding for more than 25 years and has done the Sunflower Ride 5 times? When Dr. Hagen is on his bike, Jenny can be found running: she has run 5 marathons, and is training for number 6!

On top of this, the office assistant, dental hygienists, dental coordinators and dental assistants on the Hagen Dental team like to run, lift weights, do yoga, and even pure barre—which, in many situations, means waking up at or around 4:30 or 5 AM to get in their workouts!

At the end of the day, the Hagen Dental team knows—just like you likely recognize—that keeping up with our healthy habits takes preparation, sacrifice, diligence and what you could call dedication. But, with all of those things, it is definitely worth it when crossing that finish line!

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We Can’t Wait to Meet You

Have questions or want to set up your first appointment with Hagen Dental? No matter where you are on your health journey, we can’t wait to meet and support you! Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family. The entire Hagen Dental team can’t wait to meet you.

Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy: Part One

Sunday, February 7th, 2016

hagen dentalDid you know that February is National Children’s Dental Health Month?

The American Dental Association and the ADA Foundation support the month-long, national health observance as a time where people can become more educated on the benefits of good oral health in our children.

This year the ADA is focusing on awareness around sugar and the negative effects it can have on its teeth. The 2016 campaign shows kids ways they can “defeat” the effects of sugar and maintain good oral health habits through brushing, flossing, rinsing and eating healthy snacks that are low in sugar.

Why the focus on children this month?

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease that our kids have—and the increase in sugar in particular is one of the major reasons for this issue.

Consider how, generally speaking, nutritionists recommend that children do not consume any more than 16-17 grams of sugar per day through drinks or through their food. Just think of the negative effects some of the drinks they regularly consume is having on their teeth and their ability to obtain all their required nutrients for optimal growth.

Drinks we may have at our homes or drinks that are available at school are packed with sugar:

  • Coca-Cola: 40 grams of sugar
  • Pepsi: 40 grams of sugar
  • Mountain Dew: 44 grams of sugar
  • Welch’s 100% Grape Juice: 60 grams of sugar
  • Minute Maid Orange Juice: 40 grams of sugar
  • Capri Sun: About 44 grams of sugar

One of the best ways we can help them—for life—is to raise the level of education and awareness they have when it comes to oral health, and that includes knowledge around alternatives they can choose, in this case for beverages, that can support this lifestyle.

Does Your Child Have Their “Dental Home”?

no more dental fears at hagen dental in cincinnati ohioJust think: when your child is around three they should have their “dental home,” or a dentist that they can visit and know is “their dentist.” This helps children know the process of visiting the dentist! Having “their own dentist” to go to also reinforces how important it is to visit the dentist regularly and how it’s part of the process of taking care of our teeth and body. We pride ourselves in making sure that young children are extremely comfortable and enjoy their first (and following) visits to the dentist.

Once you’ve started regularly taking your child to the dentist, another benefit is that the dentist can also help you with your child’s specific fluoride needs. Many parents also enjoy how they can rely on the dentist to offer recommendations involving antibiotics and the impact of those antibiotics on our children’s teeth. For example, discoloration, as well as other issues, can occur from prolonged use of certain antibiotics that our children are taking.

Not only that, but certain children’s medications also have a large amount of sugar in them. Once you have your dentist that is familiar with your situation, those are the kinds of things that can be discussed for preventative care and for the sake of education as they grow.

Check back in next week for part two, which will include other tips on what we can do to make sure our kids keep their teeth healthy. Have questions about your child’s specific dental health? Or are you ready to bring your child in for their first visit to the dentist? Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here.

Sources

3 Truths About Smoking & Your Health

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

dentist in cincinnati hagen dentalIt’s probably not surprising to hear that people who smoke regularly encounter quite a few negative side effects when it comes to their health.

Not only is your total health affected, but your oral health is also negatively impacted. Here are 3 ways your oral health is impacted when you smoke.

1. Smoking makes your teeth stained and yellow.

Many of us take pride in having that bright and dazzling smile to put on display. Our smile is—after all—what people notice first about us!

It’s not just vanity, though, depending on how you look at it: having a smile we are proud of actually gives us more confidence in social settings. When you smoke it makes it quite a bit harder to have a white, or a healthy-looking smile: specifically, smoking is one of the top ways to stain your teeth. Over time, it is not uncommon for people who regularly smoke to not just have stained teeth, but teeth that are quite yellow!

2. Smoking makes you more susceptible and likely to have gum disease.

Did you know if you smoke, your gums aren’t functioning as they normally would?

When you smoke, the bone and soft tissue in your mouth is impacted. What’s more is that blood flow to the gums can be significantly reduced. Smoking keeps your gum tissue cells from acting as they normally when it comes to our natural way of healing and repairing. That’s part of the reason why people who smoke are actually more prone to getting infections and gum disease.

People ask: are cigars or smoking from a pipe habits that are just as bad for our health?

The answer is that, yes, just like cigarettes, the smoke we expose our bodies to with pipes and cigars leads to more oral health problems, including more gum disease. The Journal of the American Dental Association reports how cigar smokers have bone loss (tooth and jaw) at the same rate as those who smoke cigarettes. Also, those who use pipes to smoke have a similar risk of tooth losstobacco and your oral health

3. …and smoking increases the risk of cancer.

People are aware that smoking puts you at greater risk for lung disease. And, while smoking directly contributes to gum disease (and oral disease in our body), it also puts you at greater risk for throat cancer and oral cancer. The Oral Cancer Foundation reports that if you expand the definition of oral and oropharyngeal cancers to include cancer of the larynx, the numbers of people who get diagnosed increases to about 54,000 individuals per year. What’s more alarming is that there are 13,500 deaths per year in the U.S. alone for those kinds of cancers (1, 2)!

Truths About Smoking

Sure, losing your sense of taste and smell and having bad breath are negative side effects of smoking, but if someone needs more of a deterrent, share this blog with them so they can see the tobacco-oral cancer connection.

In general, more than 20 million Americans have died because of smoking since the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health was issued more than 50 years ago (1, 2).

If you want to maintain good overall health—including oral health, you should avoid smoking. For those who already smoke, know that quitting before age 40 can reduce excess mortality attributable to continued smoking by 90 percent (5). Also, quitting before age 30 reduces risk levels by more than 97 percent (5). Those are good figures to know to motivate us into taking steps to quit a habit that has so many negative impacts on our well-being.

References/Sources

  1. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/smoking-and-tobacco
  1. http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/facts/
  1. https://www.sharecare.com/health/healthy-teeth-and-mouth/can-smoking-irritate-your-gums
  1. http://www.pensacoladentist.us/page/The-Effects-of-Smoking-on-Your-Dental-Health
  1. http://www.dentalhealth.ie/dentalhealth/causes/smoking.html
  1. http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/89/8/572.long
  1. http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/tobacco/tobacco-as-a-cause.php