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Posts Tagged ‘family dentist cincinnati’

Guess the Smiles: Reds Baseball Players

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

guess the smiles
The Cincinnati Reds are surely a hometown favorite here in Cincinnati. As members of the National League Central division, the Reds have quite a long history as a baseball club.

You may be a fan yourself, and maybe you even head down to some of the baseball games each year, but can you recognize some of the Reds’ players smiles—out of context, and without a clear glimpse of their jersey?

Take a guess and then scroll down below to see if you really do know The Machine like you think you do!

  1. This player is a four-time All-Star

joey votto

Photo via Wikipedia Common – user Blackngold29

2. This player might just be the fastest on the team!

billy h

Photo via MLB

3. This player could have a second career in music…

bronson

Photo courtesy of SD Dirk on Flickr

4. This Reds’ player is widely known by fans as “The Groundhog.”

mesor

Photo via rotoprofessor.com

5. Hint: he may play shortstop…

zack

Photo via Zimbio.com

6. Can you get this BONUS smile?

smile

And now for your answers!

1. If you guessed Joey Votto, you were right!

joey

2. Billy Hamilton. (He really IS fast!)

billy

3. Bronson Arroyo. (Pictured here without his guitar.)

fullbronson

Photo courtesy of SD Dirk on Flickr

4. Devin Mesoraco

meso

Photo via rotoprofessor.com

5. Zack Cozart

zack

Photo via Zimbio.com

6. Bonus: Bryan Price! Of course how could we forget the Cincinnati Reds’ manager, Bryan Price. If you knew this one you really do know your hometown team!

bryan

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Earning Your Trust, One Patient at a Time!

We’re proud to serve Greater Cincinnati—and of course, whether or not you consider yourself a Reds fan! At Hagen Dental Practice, our first goal, from the moment you walk in the door, is to earn a feeling of trust.

We believe the absolute best dentistry we can provide will only take place when there is a strong bond of trust with our patients, and we’re all working together toward the common goals of healthy teeth and gums and a beautiful smile. Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family!

7 Famous Smiles We Love

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

famous smiles a blog by hagen dental

It takes 43 muscles to frown, but only 2 to smile.

With that said, we wanted to highlight a few of the most well known smiles!

1. Mona Lisa

You’ve probably heard of Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa painting, since after all, it’s been called the most famous smile of all time. The Mona Lisa smile is one of the most intriguing and talked about smiles of all time, despite how she’s not even showing any teeth! It’s said that the “Mona Lisa” is actually a spelling error, and it should be “Monna Lisa,” which in Italian, is a short form of Madonna.

The painting lives in a dedicated, climate-controlled room that cost $7 million to build within the Louvre museum of Paris. Reports claim the painting is considered priceless, so it can’t be insured. The most popular belief is the woman Leonardo painted is Lisa Gherardini.

If you look close, the 24 year old has no eyebrows! A much-talked about question is why (or how) Mona Lisa appears to be smiling one moment, but the next she appears to be serious.

Is the Mona Lisa smile magical or can it be vanishing right in front of our eyes?

The answer is that much of what we see depends on lighting, visual pathways and even where we look on the painting.

2. Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple began her career at age 3, and won over people’s hearts in movies such as Heidi and Curley Top. She also sang the song “You Gotta Smile to be Happy,” which could make just about anyone smile. President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “As long as our country has Shirley Temple, we will be all right.” She will be remembered as the first child star and for her radiant smile.

3. Princess Diana

Very full of life and known to be shy, Princess Diana of Wales had a beautiful smile. The so-called “People’s Princess” was a fashion icon and also a philanthropist. She was very much covered in the media and many photographers aimed to get a photo of her bright smile.

4. George Clooney

No list of famous smiles would be complete without actor and director, George Clooney. George is frequently named as one of the most good-looking men in the world, and his smile helps him earn such honors.

5. Michael Jordan

“Air Jordan,” as he is sometimes called, is surely one of the best basketball players of all times—and he also has a great smile. With so many athletic accolades to his name, it is no wonder so many of MJ’s photos on the court and off, show him smiling!

6. Audrey Hepburn

Both an actress and humanitarian, Audrey Hepburn is one of the top fashion icons of all time. We think part of what makes her so fashionable, even to this day, is her one-of-a-kind smile.

7. Julia Roberts

No such list would be complete without Julia Roberts. Her smile has garnered so much attention because it is natural, symmetrical, and she has healthy, enviable gums.

Looking to increase your confidence when it comes to your smile? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500. Find our website here.

Top Questions: Your Child’s Oral Health

Friday, September 19th, 2014

childrens dentist cincinnati ohio hagen

This week we answer 4 questions about children’s oral health.

1. Can my children have the kind of tooth sensitivity I have?

When adults have tooth sensitivity, the medical term for it is “dentin hypersensitivity.” If you’ve been reading our blog, you’d know that it’s a result of gum recession or exposed roots. (This kind of teeth sensitivity is often caused by improper brushing habits, gum disease or early stages of gum disease, and it can be made worse by what we eat or drink.)

To answer the question, however, it’s pretty unlikely your kids will experience this kind of uncomfortable feeling when they go to eat their favorite foods, or hot/cold drinks.

If they do mention having some kind of tooth or gum sensitivity, it might be from a cavity, which is of course a major source of sensitivity or pain!

What else might be causing some kind of sensitivity?

If a tooth breaks or cracks, our kids can also have some discomfort.

Look to make sure your children are not biting on ice, using their teeth as tools (biting things open, etc.), and make sure they wear a mouth guard when they play sports.  If they show resistance to wearing a mouth guard, remind them of how common it is for professional athletes to now wear mouth guards! It can save their teeth (not to mention prevent damage to their jaw), so it’s definitely worth getting into the habit of wearing.

These are ways to prevent some of the most common ways we can crack or break our teeth, but even with these precautions, our children may experience discomfort in their mouth, or they may unfortunately experience injury to their mouth in general. Be sure to bring them in to us to discuss all their options if either is the case.

2. I know the value of going to the dentist, but why do we need to bring our young children in for regular visits?

Of course you want your children to have confidence when it comes to their entire health…and that includes confidence when it comes to smiling—both now and in the coming years. Our kids learn a lot of positive dental habits at a young age, and the idea of going to the dentist fits into this category as well.

But also recall that the most common childhood disease is actually cavities or tooth decay. Going to the dentist is one of the key ways we can look to prevent this with our children.

Find that difficult to believe?

Tooth decay actually affects one in four kids in the US that are between the age of 2 and 5. When you look at children a bit older, between 12 and 15, that ratio jumps to one in two, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since this kind of tooth decay can typically be prevented with habits and dietary choices, it goes to show how starting early is important.

It’s also possible that if baby teeth do decay, and as a result fall out sooner than they would have normally, the adult teeth don’t have as much room as they should when they come in!

That’s just one more reason to come visit the dentist, right alongside your other childhood doctor visits.

3. My child appears to be grinding their teeth. What should I do?

Come in and see us! Without giving specific recommendations, in general, we want to treat a child who is grinding their teeth differently in order to protect their teeth over time.

This may require wearing a custom appliance or mouth guard at night, but we’d also want to better determine what could be the cause of the teeth grinding. It’s good that these types of behaviors are being identified, but it’s also a situation where you should come in to the office to speak with Dr. Hagen to see the right solution for your child.

4. Speaking of which, as a parent, what should I be telling Dr. Hagen when it comes to my child’s oral health, or overall state of health, when we come in for a visit?

That’s a great question. We are all about two-way, transparent communication at Hagen Dental. Be sure to tell us any concerns you have, and that includes any questions you or your children may have.

You will hear us ask about medications that your children may be taking. See this blog for why that’s so important when it comes to their dental care.

Besides letting us know any concerns or questions you have, also tell us any other health conditions we should know about. It’s not that we are nosey, rather, this is about your child’s entire health, and the mouth can really give us insight about your child’s current state of health—that is, when we are informed!

The kind of information you’d want to tell us includes any medical conditions (including history), any kind of pain or abnormal mouth/gum issues a child has had, and things such as allergies, asthma, diabetes, or other health-related conditions you would discuss with your other doctors.

It might not seem to be related to dental care, but more often than not, it is. Have any questions about your children’s teeth or gums? Schedule a visit with us today

What Teeth Whitener Can—and Cannot—Do

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

Just like with other technology, we’ve had the latest and greatest when it comes to teeth whitening in our office.

Even if we have good oral hygiene, teeth do get darker as we age. And yes, it is true that even if you have oral health habits that would make the dentist smile, that doesn’t mean you don’t eat or drinks beverages that can stain teeth over time as well!

Teeth stains are different than “normal” discoloration as we age, but both can contribute to a less-than-perfectly-white smile.

Our Pearly Whites…Or Not Quite So Pearly White!

Discoloration can be broke down into intrinsic and extrinsic color. Think of intrinsic as our teeth’s natural shade. People born with a hint of grey, or brown or yellow teeth would likely be more aware of this, as their teeth have this as their natural shade. This would refer to a color or shade of that is not due to their habits over time.

And as you can likely guess, when we drink coffee or wine, or have a certain medicine that alters our teeth, the extrinsic part of our teeth is what is being affected. What also affects our teeth’s shade includes other behaviors we can control such as smoking, which is one habit that can greatly reduce any efforts at keeping our teeth white.

teeth whiten cincinnati

When we purchase an OTC whitener from a drugstore, there are quite a variety of brands to choose from based on your desired goals, as well as your tooth sensitivity.

They also come with varying levels of success in terms of whitening efficacy because the bleach in them will vary, and the trays or ways in which they are applied will also effect their ability to work on any given person’s teeth. They do, however, provide more whitening benefit than your whitening toothpaste since they will have more bleach in them in comparison.

No matter if you use OTC whiteners, or Zoom! Whitening at our office, if you do not take good care of your teeth, it will be hard to keep your teeth white…and it can even be hard to get them whiter through the use of bleach in general.

Knowing this, the difference between the OTC brands and Zoom! is the level of intensity, effectiveness, and safety.

With Zoom!, we apply hydrogen-peroxide formula to your teeth. Then, we cover your surrounding gum so that you can avoid teeth sensitivity, or so-called “Zingers”.

If you use a kit at home, this process can be harder to setup so that you can whiten without any sensitivity. If you have a cavity or gum that is pulling back from the teeth, you could be exposing harsh bleach to those areas…you can see why that might hurt! Next, Zoom! Whitening uses a ultraviolet light that we directly shine onto your teeth. This way, within an hour you can fight the discoloration and be on your way. With many OTC options, that whitening process could take several weeks, or up to several months.

Since it happens much quicker, is the Zoom! Whitening option safe?

Zoom! Whitening at Hagen is in fact safe. It it were not in your best interest, we would let you know. On the other hand, if you want to use an OTC agent, ask us before proceeding so we can talk to you about your options, including the effectiveness and the safety of your kit from the store. Our real concern would be to avoid over-use, general misuse, or doing some damage to your teeth or gums. We don’t want to see you in excruciating pain.

“I’m not ready for any teeth whitening, but what can I do to prevent as much stains as possible?”

Pigmented molecules in food and beverages are actually watch latch onto our enamel. You probably know some of these offenders that are chromogen-rich in particular:

  • Black coffee
  • Dyed sweets
  • Red wine
  • Pop
  • Deeply-colored sauces (such as soy sauce)
  • Blueberries, cranberries, pomegranates or other dark berries

Certain gums and hard candies, in some situations, also fit into this category. If desired, you can avoid these foods and beverages. Also remember that smoking is very detrimental to any teeth whitening efforts.

Also on the list are foods with tannins, or with high acidity. These are things such as tea, pop or carbonated beverages with dye, sports drinks and acidic fruit. Some of these are not so brightly colored, but they still can work against our pearly whites.

Want to know more about our cosmetic dentistry procedures? Find out more here and let us know any questions you may have.

Why Does Good Oral Hygiene Matter? Looking Beyond Our Mouth

Monday, August 25th, 2014

More than 90 percent of systemic diseases have oral symptoms, according to the Academy of General Dentistry. Additionally, as much as 80 percent of adults in the US have gum disease.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the research as to why this might matter for the sake of our entire health.

A Look at the Science: Heart Health to Obesity 

We’ve talked about before how gum disease can lead to loss of bone and teeth, and how bacteria that cause gum disease have also been found in arterial plaques, which contributes to heart disease.

cincinnati dentist hagenWhat else does some of the latest research tell us?

Self-reported dental status has been shown to be connected with heart risk factors. One such study examining this connection was found in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The study looked are more than 15,000 people across nearly 40 countries to draw its conclusions.

Here is a glimpse of the study: 25 percent of the participants reported gum bleeding when they brushed their teeth. Around 41 percent had fewer than 15 teeth left. All the participants in the study had coronary heart disease in combination with at least another heart risk factor.

Ultimately, the research showed an association between the number of heart risk factors and gum disease across the sample.

While it has been debated whether periodontal disease is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (which takes 600,000 lives per year), this study was one where you can see evidence of how self-reported gum disease and such cardiovascular risk factors are associated.

More Clues About Our Health

Besides moderate or more advanced stages of periodontal disease showing us clues as to whether someone may develop heart disease, oral health also affects our state of health in other ways. It can negatively affect pregnancy and birth; one example being that gum disease is linked to premature birth and low birth weight in babies. Osteoporosis has been linked, in some studies, with periodontal bone loss. Additionally, tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s.

And although the cause-and-effect tie can be debated, there is also research connecting obesity and gum disease now. In particular, the research published in the Journal General Dentistry says how chronic inflammation is in part to blame.

Still other research shows a tie between poor dental habits and an increase in our risk of cancer.

There is also HPV; research in the Journal Cancer Prevention says that poor oral health means a 56 percent bump in oral HPV prevalence.  

Additionally, University of Texas Health Sciences Center researchers found dental problems are linked with a 28 percent higher prevalence of infection with HPV.

Another study was compiled by researchers from Brown University, the Forsyth Institute and Harvard University. These researchers said how they found that our body’s antibodies coming from certain oral bacteria is actually linked with doubled risk of pancreatic cancer. The researchers admitted that more needed to be studied to make any further claims, but it does show just one more example of how our oral health is tied to our entire health.  

This list of some of the latest research is not to make you worry. It may surprise you to learn that research has also produced evidence that shows how just getting your teeth professionally cleaned once can reduce risk for heart attach and stroke. (Think of a lifetime of regular professional teeth cleanings!)

The health of our mouths truly can really tell us about our quality of life.

At Hagen, we are the best choice for all your dental care. Whether you haven’t missed a cleaning in your lifetime, or whether it has been years since you have been to the dentist, we are looking forward to seeing you. Give us a call today.