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Diabetes Prevention Is In Your Hands…And Your Mouth!

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Sugar and nutrition are the culprits behind many health concerns. You’ve heard us talk about limiting sugar for your oral health: cleaning up your diet and incorporating healthier lifestyle choices makes sense for your dental hygiene as well as your entire body’s future health!

Diabetes: Here’s What to Know

There are many reasons to attempt to avoid developing diabetes. Diabetes puts you at risk for additional health concerns, such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease. Another complication is an increased risk for gum problems, since poor blood glucose control makes gum problems more likely. In fact, the relationship goes both ways. New research suggests that gum disease can also affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. To make matters worse, those with diabetes are more likely to develop thrush, dry mouth, and experience tooth loss (1, 2).

Type 2 diabetes is now the most common – and preventable – type of diabetes. Making lifestyle choices that support your health and prevent this disease is the best and biggest way to take a step towards prevention (3). It might surprise you to learn that sugar intake isn’t the only cause of diabetes: it’s actually a multi-factorial issue.

Tips To Preventing Diabetes

If you are overweight, have a family history of diabetes, lead a sedentary lifestyle, or currently include high amounts of sugar in your diet, you should make diabetes prevention a priority. Check out these prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association (3). Not only will these tips help prevent diabetes; they will help you maintain great oral health in the process. And we think that is win-win!

1. Aim to Eat More Nutrient Dense Foods

You have heard us talk about the health concerns of too much sugar in your diet. Sugar can sit in your mouth after eating, causing increased bacteria growth, decay, and damage to your teeth and gums. But it is also the culprit behind many health conditions. Excess sugar intake can lead to blood sugar control problems as well as weight gain, both of which are risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes.

Increasing your fiber intake brings prevention into your hands and mouth in several ways. It helps improve your blood sugar control, it lowers your risk of heart disease, and it promotes weight loss by helping you feel full for longer. In addition, fibrous food’s rough quality helps keep your teeth cleaner – a perk we are on board with!

What foods are high in fiber? Think roughage foods – vegetables, beans, fruits, whole grains and nuts. These foods pack a lot of bulky substance as well as nutrition. We call these nutrient-dense foods, compared to their more “empty calorie” high-sugar, low-fiber counterparts, such as processed candies, crackers, cookies and snacks.

Whole grains also help reduce your risk of diabetes and maintain blood sugar levels. Unlike refined sugar products, whole grains take longer to digest, thus dumping sugars into your blood more slowly (3).

2. Become More Physically Active

Regular exercise helps you lose weight, or maintain a healthy weight. It also burns calories and lowers your blood sugar – that energy currently in your blood waiting to be used or stored as fat for later. Exercise has also been found to boost your sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity is necessary to transfer sugar out of your blood into cells and helps keep your blood sugar within a normal, healthy range.

hagen dental health

ALL types of exercise help control diabetes! But the very best benefit comes when your fitness routine includes both cardio and resistance training. So mix it up! But most importantly, get moving: A sedentary lifestyle means increased risk for diabetes (3).

3. Lose A Few Extra Pounds

Being overweight also increases your risk of Type 2 diabetes. Don’t be overwhelmed if you feel like you have a long way to go! Every pound you lose can improve your health status. A recent study found that those who decreased their weight by just 7% saw a 60% reduction in diabetes risk. However, avoid fad diets. Lifestyle changes, such as diet changes and exercise, are the safest and most effective tools to achieving long-lasting weight loss and health benefits (3).

dental health cincinnati

Your Oral Health and Overall Health Are Connected

The Surgeon General’s “Report on Oral Health” reminds us that good oral health is vital to our body’s general health. Regular brushing, flossing, and a conscious effort to eat healthfully make a huge impact – not only in your mouth – but for your other body systems as well (2).

Working towards the lifestyles changes mentioned above can reverse prediabetes, lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, improve your health overall, help you feel more energetic, and reduce your chances of diabetic-related oral health issues (4).

Keep Us In The Loop!

People with diabetes have special needs. All of us at Hagen Dental Practice are equipped to meet those needs, so be sure to tell us if you have diabetes! Keep us informed of any changes in your condition, as well as about any medication you might be taking.

Good Dental Health For All

Whether you are diabetic, pre-diabetic, or neither, regular checkups with Dr. Hagen are crucial to maintaining a healthy mouth and detecting oral health concerns early. Have questions or need to schedule your next appointment? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/
  2. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/diabetes-and-oral-health.html
  3. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-prevention/art-20047639
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/prediabetes-type2/preventing.html

7 Surprising Things That Happen When You Smile

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017

We grow up hearing so many things about smiles:

“It takes more muscles to frown than it does to smile.”

“When you smile, the whole world smiles with you.”

“Turn that frown upside down.”

“Don’t cry because it’s over; smile because it happened!”

So what exactly happens when we smile?

  1. You’ll End Up With A Better Mood

When you smile, your mood is elevated. Psychologists have found this holds true whether you are feeling grumpy or happy before you smile. The positive impact of a smile helps reduce your stress levels, resulting in a happier disposition (1,2).

  1. Your Immune System Will Get A Boost

Your body relaxes, stress decreases, and energy becomes more positive when you smile. These contribute to good health and a stronger immune system. Frequent smiling causes your body to produce more white blood cells, an important component of your immune system in helping fight and prevent illness (1). Smile your way through the cold season this year!

  1. Your Stress Levels Go Down

Learning to smile in tough or stressful situations can be a challenge, but doing so results in dramatic health benefits by lowering stress and anxiety. People who smile while recovering from a stressful situation are found to have lower heart rates and a calmer presence (1).

smiles are contagious

  1. You’ll Probably Cause Someone Else To Smile

Smiles really are contagious. Research shows that seeing someone smile activates the area of the brain that controls facial movement. Thus, the smilee becomes the smiler! A study in Sweden found that people had difficulty frowning when they looked at smiling subjects; their muscles started twitching into smiles (1,2).

  1. People Will Find You More Confident, Trustworthy And Attractive

Smiles are the most easily recognized facial expression, recognized around the globe as a sign of happiness and acceptance. Smiles make a person seem more attractive, personable, empathetic and confident. Research found that smiles rank higher in attraction than makeup! A study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology found that smiles do indeed make you more attractive to those you smile at. A smile is an inviting expression that lets people know you are friendly and willing to talk, and helps people trust you more readily (1,2).

cute dog smile through life

  1. Endorphins Are Released

When you smile, a chemical reaction occurs in the brain, releasing endorphins. Endorphins are chemicals that help you feel happier. Endorphins are those molecules in the body that are released during exercise and running as well, causing “runner’s high” (1,2).

  1. You’ll Feel More Comfortable

Smiling can make you feel more comfortable, even in situations in which you might otherwise feel awkward. Smiling also takes less effort than frowning. Easier facial expressions are a more comfortable option. Smiles also make you more approachable. If others around you feel more comfortable, it will help you feel more comfortable, too (1,2).

feel great about your smile

Call Hagen Dental Practice so That You Can Keep Smiling with Confidence

Hagen Dental wants you to feel great about your smile – so you can show it off to the world and enjoy these physical and emotional benefits! Give us a call to learn more: (513) 251-5500

Sources

  1. http://inspiyr.com/9-benefits-of-smiling/
  2. https://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/15-fascinating-facts-about-smiling/

Save Money & Stay Healthy with Preventive Dental Care

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

Good dental health prevention helps to avoid cavities, gum disease, enamel wear, and other oral diseases, dysfunctions and issues. What does this mean for you? Fresher breath, a healthy and comfortable mouth, less trips to the dentist for surgeries, and less money spent!

Preventive dentistry is simply the practice of caring for your teeth to keep them healthy, rather than waiting for a problem to arise.

dental-prevention-prevents-future-problems

Here are the top seven ways you can make preventive dentistry part of your normal routine:

1. Brush Your Teeth Daily

This is up there as one of the most important preventive habits. Brush your teeth and tongue twice daily to remove bacteria, germs and food particles from your mouth, and freshen up your breath (1).

2. Brush Properly

The WAY you brush is as important as how OFTEN you brush. Take your time, gently brushing in a circular motion to remove plaque and debris. Cross friction and brushing too hard can lead to gum erosion. Brushing too hurriedly can mean missing spots or removal of debris (2).

the-way-you-brush-is-important

3. Floss Daily

Flossing cleans out the tight spaces between the teeth, stimulates the gums, reduces plaque, and lowers inflammation in the area. This is just as important as brushing! Want to make sure you’re flossing the correct way? Ask us at your next dental appointment to ensure you’re getting the full flossing benefit.

4. Consider Mouthwash

Mouthwash helps in several ways: It reduces the acidity of the mouth, cleans harder-to-brush areas in and around the gums and base of teeth, and helps to re-mineralize the teeth.

5. Visit Your Dentist

You should see us at least twice per year for your oral exam and cleanings. Dental cleanings allow our dental professionals to clean your teeth more effectively than what you can accomplish at home. At least one of those visits should include an exam to check for early signs of problems in your teeth or gums.

The examination takes a deeper look at the health of your oral cavity: x-rays to detect early issues or changes, oral cancer screenings of the surrounding tissues, and comparative checkups to ensure continued oral health. Early detection of disease or dental issues is critical to keeping problems to a minimum.

early-detection-is-part-of-prevention

6. Eat a Balanced Diet

Just like the rest of your body, your teeth need proper nutritional building blocks and vitamins to stay healthy. Limiting your sugars, simple carbohydrates, acidic foods and acidic beverages are important choices to help lower your risk of infections and tooth wear (1,2).

7. Drink More Water

It is very important to stay hydrated for overall health, and oral health is no exception. Drink plenty of water throughout your day. This can help neutralize negative effects of various sticky or acidic foods and beverages (1,2).

Preventive dentistry habits save you time, money and toothache (literally) by helping you avoid or lessening the effects of cavities, gingivitis, tooth decay and enamel loss, and periodontitis. Prevention is more fun – and much less costly – than tooth extractions, cavity fillings and root canals. The most effective way to ensure optimal dental health is to defend against and stop disease before it even starts. Now that is something to smile about!

Give Us A Call At Hagen Dental Practice

Are you ready to give yourself the gift of better dental health this holiday season? Call us at (513) 251-5500 to learn more about your preventive dental needs!

Sources

  1. http://www.healthline.com/health/preventative-dentistry
  2. http://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/best-practices-for-healthy-teeth
  3. https://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Public%20Programs/Files/bringing-disease-prevention-to-communities_adh.ashx

10 Reasons to Smile This World Smile Day

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

world-smile-day-pic

We celebrate World Smile Day in October. World Smile Day is a day designed to help people smile more by performing random acts of kindness and goodwill. Here are 10 reminders of why we should be smiling:

  1. The classic yellow smiley face that we all know and love was created in 1963. It was designed to symbolize good will and good cheer on the planet (1). Although the original smiley doesn’t include teeth, at Hagen Dental we want to keep your teeth healthy so you can bare your pearly whites even if the smiley face doesn’t!
  2. Harvey Ball, the artist who was the creator of the smiley face, became concerned over the years about the over-commercialization of the smiley symbol. This led him to create World Smile Day, so that we would devote a day each year to smiles and kind acts throughout the world. The first World Smile Day was celebrated in 1999 (1).
  3. The smiley face knows no politics, no geography and no religion. Neither does tooth and gum disease. So no matter your race, creed or location, stay vigilant with your oral hygiene habits! Proper diet, daily flossing and brushing, are important to keep issues at bay.
  4. The slogan of the Smile Foundation is, “improving this world, one smile at a time” (2). We can relate to that message at Hagen Dental, since our focus is to help each of our patients keep their oral health up to par, helping them enjoy their mouth and smile. Stay current with your cleanings and checkups so that we can improve your smile and keep it healthy.

reasons-to-smile

  1. We can all use a reason to grin. Hagen Dental gives us a reason: We treat our patients with compassion and understanding, coupled with the latest technology, and the best in dental comfort. In other words, we care about our patients.
  2. Heidi Klum says: “I believe that when you put a smile out there, you get a smile back” (3). Keeping your teeth, gums, and mouth healthy gives you the courage and confidence to share your smile freely and frequently.
  3. The power of a smile has been documented endlessly over the years by authors, activists, singers, photographers, filmmakers, and beyond! (4). Imagine the entertainment business without the great dental technologies and oral hygiene practices that are common today.
  4. Smiles are contagious! Studies show that you can “infect” loved ones with your emotions and facial expressions (5,6). Focus on sharing positive feelings and emotions to keep the world around you in a happier state.
  5. Just as Richelle E. Goodrich says, “A smile is a light that sets your inner self aglow, letting others know you’re home,” (7) your smile and face are a window into your inner self. Put your best self forward by keeping your regularly scheduled dental appointments.
  6. The official message of the World Smile Day is: “Do an act of kindness. Help one person smile.” What can you do this month to help celebrate World Smile Day?

Keep that Smile Bright: Call Hagen Dental Practice Today

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://worldsmileday.com/index.php/article-index/item/363-welcome-to-the-world-smile-day-website
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Smile_Day
  3. http://www.ibtimes.com/world-smile-day-2016-quotes-16-happy-sayings-get-you-grinning-2427994
  4. http://www.latintimes.com/world-smile-day-quotes-top-15-famous-sayings-about-power-smiling-401222
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11408051
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12738341
  7. http://answersafrica.com/world-smile-day-2016.html

 

Oral Health: Does It Have An Updated Meaning Today?

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

oral health hagen dental in cincinnati

The World Dental Federation is a worldwide organization for the dental profession, representing over a million dentists across the globe! It’s called the FDI for short, because it was established in Paris as the “Fédération dentaire international” (1).

It’s now located in Geneva, Switzerland. Each year, approximately 300 delegates meet to discuss issues, debate changes, and define the future of dentistry across the world. These members are representatives from over 200 national dental associations and over 130 specialist groups from various countries. One of the missions of the FDI is to “promote optimal oral and general health for all peoples” (2, 3).

Earlier this month, the World Dental Federation launched an updated definition of the term “oral health.”

The term “oral” refers to all the components of your mouth and oral cavity: The teeth, gums, connective tissues, jaw bones, soft palate, mucosal tissue of the mouth and throat, tongue, lips, chewing muscles, salivary glands and the branches of the immune, nervous and vascular systems that supply, protect and nourish these tissues. That part hasn’t changed!

The FDI wanted to bring the definition up to contemporary standards by designating oral health as an integral part of an individual’s general health and well-being. The new definition was created by the Federation’s “Vision 2020 Think Tank”, which includes experts from oral health backgrounds, public health officials, and health economics experts (3).

So What Has Changed?

So what is the main differences between the old definition and the new definitions being used—and why does it matter?

Dr. Michael Click, co-chair of the FDI’s Vision 2020 Think Tank explains: “The old definition lacked a theoretical framework that made assessment and evaluation of oral health hard to measure,” he said. “Furthermore, this new definition moves dentistry from treating disease to treating a person with disease.” He went on to say they created a new definition so it could resonate with more people.

The intention is that more people will be able to understand concepts related to our oral health!

These changes might seem subtle, but they do have big significance. Oral health does not occur in isolation…in other words, the health of your teeth, gums, and entire mouth are a part of and acutely related to, your overall health. These new definitions help to clarify and validate that!

In summary, the main points, as defined by the World Dental Federation:

  1. Oral health is multifaceted. A “healthy smile” is more than being “cavity-free” and we agree with that, too! It includes the ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow and express emotion through facial movements. It means being able to do these things confidently and without pain, discomfort or disease.
  2. Oral health is a fundamental part of health, including both physical and mental wellbeing. Another area we agree with! Oral health and our overall health is influenced by the values attitudes of individuals and communities. This means that although oral health is always important—even if the quality of care varies depending on what country you live!
  3. Oral health is a reflection of the physiological, social, and psychological factors that are essential to the quality of life. That’s a mouthful, but also true! The point is: oral health is engrained in more facets of our lives than we may realize.
  4. Oral health is influenced by a person’s experiences, perceptions, expectations and ability to adapt to circumstances. Our overall health affects our oral health, just as our oral health has effect on our overall health (3).
    oral-health-quote

This broadened definition of oral health serves to update the definition to a complete state of physical, mental and social well-being, rather than just the absence of disease or health issue.

It embodies our understanding that everything in the body is intrinsically connected: oral health and general health go hand in hand, rather than being two separate concepts.

What does this mean for you? You cannot be truly healthy without good oral health! This puts enormous importance on good oral hygiene, positive lifestyle habits, and regular dental visits. At Hagen Dental Practice, we strive to help you achieve oral health, with the understanding that it helps you maintain and enhance your overall health.

We Can’t Wait to Meet You & Your Family

Don’t delay your visit. Early detection saves lives. Call us today to schedule an appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Sources/References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FDI_World_Dental_Federation
  2. http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/members_partners/member_list/fdi/en/
  3. http://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2016-archive/september/fdi-adopts-new-definition
  4. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/SurgeonGeneral/sgr/chap1.htm

 

Oral Cancer: This Is Why Early Detection Is Critical

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

oral health at hagen dental dds in cincinnati ohio

Almost 50,000 people are diagnosed with oral cancer each year (1). Sounds pretty surprising, doesn’t it? This includes cancers of the tongue, lips, gums, and other soft palate tissues of the mouth or upper throat.

Talking about cancer can be scary, but there is one key component to improved odds: Early detection. Detecting the issue before the cancer has spread to other parts of the body dramatically raises the rate of survival. One of the best ways to ensure early detection is to stay consistent with your dental care and dental cleanings.

Regular dental checkups involve more than just your teeth cleaning. Dr. Hagen’s exam includes a review of the health of your entire oral cavity – teeth, gums, tongue, and palate – for signs of disease, including oral cancer. Even though you may think you know your teeth pretty well, we’re actually able to screen you for cancer when you come in!

What Are We Looking For?oral health risk factors

Dr. Hagen is trained to perform a thorough head and neck examination at your dental visit. This exam detects changes in the tissues of the mouth and surrounding areas that could signal the beginnings of cancer. Dr. Hagen knows what signs to look for, what additional tests or labs to order, and when to refer to a specialist, when necessary.

Here are some of the cancer warning signs we screen for:

  • White or red lesions that are not healing
  • Unusual bleeding
  • Lumps or thickening of the soft tissue, such as the neck or cheek
  • Soreness of the throat, or pain in the mouth that does not go away
  • Chronic feeling that something is stuck in the throat
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing
  • Difficulty moving the jaw or tongue
  • Persistent ear pain
  • Hoarseness
  • Numbness of the tongue or mouth
  • Swelling of the jaw

Sure, that seems like quite a list, but know that just because you have a symptom on this list, doesn’t mean you definitely have cancer. Because there are so many ranging symptoms, that’s why you need someone qualified to look at your mouth and jaw for early detection.

Also, know that it indicates follow up and further analysis is typically needed, because if you do have cancer, early treatment can make a critical difference in fighting the disease.

symptoms of oral cancerAnd Why is Early Detection So Important?

Which leads us to our next point: if oral cancer is discovered early, the remission rate with treatment is nearly 90 percent (5). (Remission is what doctors use when speaking about cancer to mean that there are no symptoms and no signs of cancer. This is used rather than the word “cure.”)

Approximately 60 percent of those diagnosed with oral cancer will survive at least 5 years, but this number is an average: The 5-year survival rate for those with localized disease (cancer restricted to the mouth) is 83 percent. But if the cancer has metastasized (spread to other parts of the body), the 5-year survival rate is only 32 percent.

Said another way, early detection gives you the best opportunity to diagnose the cancer while it is still localized, and before it spreads to other areas of the body (2).  

Remembering to schedule your regular dental appointment is important. Rest easy knowing we are not only trained to help treat and prevent dental problems, but also to keep a lookout and help spot signs of more serious concerns.

Is it time for your next dental appointment? Don’t delay your visit. Early detection saves lives. Call us today to schedule an appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.healthline.com/health/oral-cancer/warning-signs-of-oral-cancer
  2. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/OralCancer/DetectingOralCancer.htm
  3. http://www.atooth.com/oral-cancer/
  4. http://www.dentistry.com/conditions/oral-cancer/mouth-cancer-symptoms-early-warning-signs
  5. https://www.humana.com/learning-center/health-and-wellbeing/healthy-living/oral-cancer

Hoppin’ Facts About Bunny Teeth

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

hagen and easter

Easter often brings a combination of gift baskets, dyed Easter eggs, candy…and of course, the Easter Bunny!

Let’s take a quick look at the Easter bunny…and rabbits in general.

So what exactly does the Easter bunny have to do with Easter? It’s said that the tie-in with Easter is based some in myth, in particular, that a bunny is a symbol of both spring renewal and fertility. Springtime coincides with Easter each year, so that is part of where the tradition comes from.

The real source of the Easter – Easter bunny connection may be from German folklore in particular, with Ostara, the German goddess of springtime. It was said that the German’s “Oschter Haws” (or “Easter Hare”) laid a nest of colored eggs as gifts for the kids who were well behaved!

There’s a few other stories about the Easter Bunny and its origins, but let’s take another look at rabbits – and their teeth!

“Carrots are devine… You get a dozen for a dime, It’s maaaa-gic! – Bugs Bunny

Bugs Bunny, one of the most famous bunnies of all time, once said these words when giving praise to carrots.

But do rabbits really eat carrots?

The answer, is – well, yes! Rabbits are herbivores, so they don’t eat meat. Instead, they eat a combination of grass, clovers, wild flowers and farm crops, including carrots and other root vegetables, at least when they are in the wild.

To chew their food, they have 28 teeth – and, believe it or not – these teeth actually never stop growing. Other members of the rodent family also have this trait, also known as “teeth that are open-rooted” and it actually helps them thrive in the wild.

Why Do Rabbits’ Teeth Keep Growing?

The teeth themselves are somewhat similar to horse teeth – they have 4 large incisors (also known as front teeth) as well as the other, smaller teeth. Many people just think they have 4 large teeth, but the smaller teeth (also called peg teeth) are what help them grind their food into smaller pieces before swallowing.

Being that they are similar to horse teeth, rabbit teeth are designed to break down fibrous veggies. But what happens if a bunny is unable to get enough weed, twigs, grasses or forage in her diet?

If a wild rabbit isn’t able to get that fiber in her diet, she won’t wear down her teeth naturally, meaning the teeth will grow beyond the desirable length. If this happens, the visible section of the tooth will grow higher and meet the other tooth abnormally (instead of where it would properly be worn down). This can lead to abnormal wear for the rabbit, and the teeth can form sharp edges that can be harmful.

Just imagine if your teeth started to shape in a way where they had sharp points – you could imagine the accidental damage your tongue and cheeks could endure!

The same is true for rabbits if this happens, which is part of why they are prone to dental issues. Because rabbits in the wild aren’t always able to get the right kind of diet to wear down the teeth, this can happen more often than you’d think. In some cases, the rabbit’s teeth can become impacted and inflamed, and it can even lead to an infection in the bone.

If a rabbit is a household pet, they are also not always getting the extreme amount of fiber their teeth were designed to break down. In those cases, people can usually take their domesticated rabbits to a vet in order to cut down the teeth on a regular basis.

You Mean Bunny Teeth…Can Be Similar to Ours?

Even if your pet is getting enough fiber to keep their teeth worn down as they would naturally be in the wild, vets recommend taking your bunny in to see the doctor for regular check-ups about twice a year, unless they tell you otherwise.

Just like for us humans, these check-ups can ensure everything in the mouth – even what we can’t see – is as it should be. People may think their bunny is eating normally and isn’t showing signs of pain, but there could be an issue going on, and it’s better to catch it early than have any disease progress. In fact, did you know that rabbits are actually known for being able to hide their pain and illnesses well! Who knew! 

hagen dental dds blogWe Support Your Entire Health: Give Hagen Dental a Call Today

At Hagen Dental, we are here to partner with you so you can improve your total health. Have questions?We’d love to answer them! Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule a visit for you or your family.

Sources/References

  1. http://www.kidsplayandcreate.com/fun-bunnyrabbit-facts-for-kids/
  2. http://www.mybunny.org/info/dental-care/
  3. http://www.thedailymeal.com/7-things-you-never-knew-about-easter-bunny/4714

 

 

“Look Mom, No Cavities”: Here’s 10 Vintage Dental Ads You Don’t Want to Miss

Thursday, October 29th, 2015
5 times active

The promise of clean, fresh breath all day.

Tooth kit

Just look what 39 cents could get you in 1953!

acid fur

This one refers to “acid fur”!

baby ad

Can you believe this one?

do as your dentist

So direct!

duty

According to this ad, keeping you oral health up to par is what they call “keeping fit” and “America’s duty”!

Look mom no cavities advert

“No cavities!”

pass up the girl

Oh no! We don’t think we’d see this ad today! Here is one aimed at the ladies.

enamel

This Colgate ad talks about how nature can’t replace your enamel.

whiskey tooth paste

This ad is for genuine whiskey toothpaste!

These may be vintage ads, but we offer the latest, state-of-the-art technology and services at Hagen Dental. Learn more about our practice here and give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule an appointment.

Sources These Were Taken From:

  • http://www.smilegeneration.com/cerec

All About Lucy Hobbs Taylor, The First Woman DDS With the Cincinnati Connection

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Lucy Hobbs was born on March 14, 1833 in New York. Consider life then: Andrew Jackson was President, and at this time, most people lived in rural locations. Life was much shorter, with a life expectancy between 40 and 50 years old. Clothes were made by hand. This is even during a time when there was no indoor plumbing in rural areas!

Fast-forward more than 20 years, and Hobbs began her career as a teacher. She then made the move to Cincinnati, Ohio in 1859.

cincinnati dentist

Lucy Beaman Hobbs Taylor. Photo courtesy of kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society. For some, the name may sound a bit familiar: that’s because a scrubs and lab coat company, designed and named one of their lab coats after Hobbs Taylor. Called the Lucy H.T. Lab Coat, the company says they named the line of apparel after her “tribute to this amazing, prestigious, and accomplished woman.”

She wanted to become a dentist. She’s reported to have said that she wanted “to enter a profession where [I] could earn [my] bread not alone by the sweat of [my] brow, but by the use of [my] brains also.”

At first, she was refused admission because she was female. No woman had ever graduated dentistry school before at this point in US history, although about 4 years prior a woman named Emeline Roberts Jones became the first woman to practice dentistry. (She had been married to a dentist, and he allowed her to be his assistant.)

But Hobbs did not give up on her dream. Jonathan Taft, Dean of the Ohio College of Dental Surgery is said to have welcomed Hobbs into his office until another dentist agreed to teach her.

Hobbs began her own private program of study and soon made up her mind she would also have her own practice one day.

A Cincinnati Connection

After learning from her mentor and eventually receiving a doctorate in dentistry, despite being refused initially by the school, she started her practice in Cincinnati, making Dr. Lucy—as her patients called her—the first official woman in the US to do so.

People were amazed when they learned that a young girl had wanted to study dentistry, she explained at the time. Things sure have changed since that time!

She would then make the move to the state of Iowa to practice dentistry. By 1865, she had earned the respect of her peers who allowed her to join the Iowa State Dental Society. “The profession has nothing in its pursuits foreign to the instincts of women,” asserted the Dental Society at the time. The move helped reinforce the idea that woman could be involved in the dental industry.

Later in life, she married a railroad car painter named James M. Taylor. Ever the persuasive person, she then convinced him that he should become a dentist alongside her. After he agreed, they practiced dentistry in Lawrence, Kansas. Speaking about these years, she’s quoted as saying, “I am a New Yorker by birth, but I love my adopted country—the West. To it belongs the credit of making it possible for women to be recognized in the dental profession on equal terms with men.”

After her husband died, Hobbs Taylor took on campaigns that supported women’s rights. Less than 20 years after she became the first woman to graduate dentistry school, the American Association of Women Dentists honored Hobbs Taylor by establishing the Lucy Hobbs Taylor Award. This award is now presented annually to an American Association of Women Dentists member in recognition of professional excellence and achievements in advancing the role of women in dentistry.

It’s reported that by 1900, ten years before Hobbs Taylor’s death, about one thousand other woman followed Hobbs Taylor’s footsteps in becoming involved in the field of dentistry. Thanks in part to pioneer women such as Hobbs Taylor who refused to give up on their dreams when first told “no,” hundreds of thousands of women have been able to participate in the field of dentistry since.

When she died, her obituary captured her local legacy, saying she was “one of the most striking figures of Lawrence [who] occupied a position of honor and ability, and for years she occupied a place high in the ranks of her profession.”

First a pioneer, then a dentist, and then a mentor, Lucy Hobbs Taylor changed the face of dentistry, and even though her name isn’t necessarily widely recognized, the first woman DDS still did have a meaningful impact on history.

References

  • http://dent.umich.edu/about-school/sindecuse-museum/lucy-beaman-hobbs-taylor-first-woman-dds
  • http://home.comcast.net/~thorsdag/LucyHobbsTaylor.html

Our Founding Fathers: The State of Their Oral Health

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

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Much of American legend says that George Washington had a set of wooden teeth. The story goes that he lost his first (adult) tooth when he was 22, but by the time he became President, he had just one tooth left! By that time, he was 57 years young.

So how did he actually lose his teeth over the years?

John Adams was said to have claimed it was Brazil nuts that he would crack his teeth on. Today, we know it’s never a good idea to use your teeth as “tools” or to chomp or crunch down on items (food or otherwise) that can traumatize the teeth.

Historians said he could have faced major decay because of mercury oxide as a result of being treated for smallpox and malaria. In all likelihood, it could have been a combination of these factors, as well as a lack of modern oral care and technology.

Although urban myth continues to say he had wooden teeth, he actually had a set of teeth carved likely from dairy cattle, elephant ivory or even hippopotamus. These face-disfiguring dentures were very uncomfortable and apparently were very ill fitting.

When Washington was sworn into office as the first President of the United States, he actually had swollen, burning gums. When his dentures would open and shut, they would clack and creak.

Washington was often in pain due to his oral decay, and it’s believed he would take pain killers (of that age) for this constant pain he experienced. It’s interesting because Presidents of that time were never supposed to show any sort of weakness or signs of pain.

George Washington’s dentures in the collection at Mount Vernon

George Washington’s dentures in the collection at Mount Vernon.

But what about the other Founding Fathers’ oral health and habits?

George Washington wasn’t the only one who lost many of his teeth: so did Benjamin Franklin. Franklin is said to have taken mercury pills for an illness, and as a result, he lost several teeth.

As far as daily oral health habits,  John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and James Monroe would have all likely brushed their teeth each day.

People during the 1700s would use a form of mouthwash, and sometimes a tongue scraper. Toothpowders were made of pumice, borax, roots and herbs and sometimes even burnt bread or tobacco! In actuality, these tooth powders could actually destroy the tooth enamel. For the “mouthwash,” our Founding Fathers may have used a solution that was a mix of herbs, resins of balsam, or myrrh.

And one more myth…

It’s a myth that Patrick Henry, famous for his “Give me Liberty, or give me death!” speech actually died of a toothache. In reality, he may have complained of a toothache, but he did not die of a toothache. He actually died due to cancer.

One thing is for sure: we know much more than we did during the time of our Founding Fathers, and we also have greater access to care and state-of-the-art dental technology to keep our smiles looking great for a lifetime.

Sources

http://www.mountvernon.org/research-collections/digital-encyclopedia/article/false-teeth/

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/29/upshot/george-washingtons-weakness-his-teeth.html?_r=0&abt=0002&abg=0

Lloyd, John; Mitchinson, John (2006). The Book of General Ignorance. New York: Harmony Books. p. 97. ISBN 978-0-307-39491-0. Retrieved July 3, 2011.

Glover, Barbara (Summer–Fall 1998). “George Washington—A Dental Victim”.The Riversdale Letter. Retrieved June 30, 2006.

Dentures, 1790–1799, George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate, Museum and Gardens

Mary V. Thompson, “The Private Life of George Washington’s Slaves”, Frontline, PBS

“The Portrait—George Washington:A National Treasure”. Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved January 21, 2011.