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Posts Tagged ‘Cincinnati’

Race and Be Happy: How the Hagens Are Staying Healthy

Friday, August 28th, 2015

staying healthy at hagen dentalWe talk a lot about total health, and part of that is maintaining healthy habits that include exercising regularly.

Exercising, or finding physical training of some kind, can help us control weight, keep us in shape, combat disease, boost energy, promote sleep, and it can also provide a way for us to socialize and work on completing a goal.

Those are all positives in terms of our total health and well-being!

Training for an upcoming race can show us just how capable our bodies really are when it comes to achieving goals we set for ourselves.

Right now, the Hagen family is in-training for two races: Dr. Hagen will be participating in the Sunflower Revolution Ride in September, and Jenny Hagen will be running in the Columbus Marathon (by Nationwide Children’s Hospital) in October.

The Sunflower Revolution Ride

The Sunflower Revolution Ride, taking place in Yeatman’s Cove at Sawyer Point Park here in Cincinnati, Ohio, will benefit the Gardner Family Center for Parkinson’s Disease. “Riding for research, treatment, and a cure for Parkinson’s disease is what it’s all about. The Sunflower Revolution is making it fun to do so,” says the website. Also according to the website, more than $40,000 has already been raised for the cause!

racing quoteThe Most Meaningful Marathon: The Columbus Marathon

Jenny is training for a 26.2-mile race (a marathon) that will take place in Columbus, Ohio. It’s been called “the most meaningful marathon in country,” because each mile is actually dedicated to a “Patient Champion.” This means each mile presents a new story, a new inspiration, and another reason for runners to keep running! There will also be 1 Angel Mile to honor the children who have already run their race, and 1 Encore Mile featuring all the patients who have lined the course since 2012. What’s great is that the marathon will also benefit Nationwide Children’s.

Dr. Hagen and Jenny have been quite busy with training this Summer as they prepare to take on the physical and mental challenges of these two races.

How are you training or what races are you looking forward to in the coming months? Connect with us on Facebook here for more healthy lifestyle tips and education.

Our Founding Fathers: The State of Their Oral Health

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

found

Much of American legend says that George Washington had a set of wooden teeth. The story goes that he lost his first (adult) tooth when he was 22, but by the time he became President, he had just one tooth left! By that time, he was 57 years young.

So how did he actually lose his teeth over the years?

John Adams was said to have claimed it was Brazil nuts that he would crack his teeth on. Today, we know it’s never a good idea to use your teeth as “tools” or to chomp or crunch down on items (food or otherwise) that can traumatize the teeth.

Historians said he could have faced major decay because of mercury oxide as a result of being treated for smallpox and malaria. In all likelihood, it could have been a combination of these factors, as well as a lack of modern oral care and technology.

Although urban myth continues to say he had wooden teeth, he actually had a set of teeth carved likely from dairy cattle, elephant ivory or even hippopotamus. These face-disfiguring dentures were very uncomfortable and apparently were very ill fitting.

When Washington was sworn into office as the first President of the United States, he actually had swollen, burning gums. When his dentures would open and shut, they would clack and creak.

Washington was often in pain due to his oral decay, and it’s believed he would take pain killers (of that age) for this constant pain he experienced. It’s interesting because Presidents of that time were never supposed to show any sort of weakness or signs of pain.

George Washington’s dentures in the collection at Mount Vernon

George Washington’s dentures in the collection at Mount Vernon.

But what about the other Founding Fathers’ oral health and habits?

George Washington wasn’t the only one who lost many of his teeth: so did Benjamin Franklin. Franklin is said to have taken mercury pills for an illness, and as a result, he lost several teeth.

As far as daily oral health habits,  John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and James Monroe would have all likely brushed their teeth each day.

People during the 1700s would use a form of mouthwash, and sometimes a tongue scraper. Toothpowders were made of pumice, borax, roots and herbs and sometimes even burnt bread or tobacco! In actuality, these tooth powders could actually destroy the tooth enamel. For the “mouthwash,” our Founding Fathers may have used a solution that was a mix of herbs, resins of balsam, or myrrh.

And one more myth…

It’s a myth that Patrick Henry, famous for his “Give me Liberty, or give me death!” speech actually died of a toothache. In reality, he may have complained of a toothache, but he did not die of a toothache. He actually died due to cancer.

One thing is for sure: we know much more than we did during the time of our Founding Fathers, and we also have greater access to care and state-of-the-art dental technology to keep our smiles looking great for a lifetime.

Sources

http://www.mountvernon.org/research-collections/digital-encyclopedia/article/false-teeth/

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/29/upshot/george-washingtons-weakness-his-teeth.html?_r=0&abt=0002&abg=0

Lloyd, John; Mitchinson, John (2006). The Book of General Ignorance. New York: Harmony Books. p. 97. ISBN 978-0-307-39491-0. Retrieved July 3, 2011.

Glover, Barbara (Summer–Fall 1998). “George Washington—A Dental Victim”.The Riversdale Letter. Retrieved June 30, 2006.

Dentures, 1790–1799, George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate, Museum and Gardens

Mary V. Thompson, “The Private Life of George Washington’s Slaves”, Frontline, PBS

“The Portrait—George Washington:A National Treasure”. Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved January 21, 2011.

The Complete Guide to Dry Mouth: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

Dry Mouth

“It seems like my mouth is drier than normal.”

This is what someone may think or say when they are experiencing abnormal dry mouth.

Chronic dry mouth, also called xerostomia, is when we have a lack of saliva or when we have a reduced amount of saliva.

While the actual incidents of chronic dry mouth increase as people age, dry mouth is not a normal part of aging.

Symptoms of Dry Mouth

Dry mouth is a sticky, parched and potentially gritty feeling in the mouth.

But also know that the following are other symptoms of dry mouth:

  • Bad breath
  • Different sense of taste (or a taste disorder)
  • Lipstick sticking to teeth
  • Increased need to drink water
  • Inflamed tongue
  • Cracked lips
  • A red or raw tongue
  • A dry feeling in your throat
  • Abnormal difficulties in chewing or speaking

There are many reasons why we can experience dry mouth, and dry mouth is more common than you would think. The simplest explanation for dry mouth is an inadequate function of our salivary glands.Why Dry Mouth Occurs

Over the counter and prescription drugs can impact the saliva in our mouths. Take for example blood pressure medications and antihistamines, just two examples—of as many as 400 medications—that can alter the saliva level in the mouth.

But there are other health-related reasons that can result in dry mouth:

  • Radiation treatment for head and neck cancer
  • Salivary gland disease
  • Emotional stress
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Chemotherapy
  • Nerve damage
  • Snoring or breathing through your mouth
  • Other medical conditions including diabetes, HIV/AIDs and Sjogren’s syndrome

Talk with your dentist about the medications you are taking and any other changes in your health to help determine the cause of your dry mouth. Remember that when we age, particularly over the age of 50, our body’s thirst sensation may reduce. If we aren’t drinking enough water each day, this can contribute to dry mouth.

The Negative Effects of Dry Mouth

Saliva helps us chew, start digestion, protects our teeth from decay, and helps heal sores that are in our mouths. It also helps prevent infection by controlling bacteria and fungi in the mouth. Accelerated tooth decay can develop if we have dry mouth, and our ability to digest properly can also be affected if we have trouble chewing.

What We Can Do

Do you feel a sticky or (abnormal) dry feeling in your mouth? When it’s out of the norm, be sure to tell us about it. Not only is dry mouth uncomfortable, but it can lead to serious health consequences and it can also signal a health condition you need to be aware of. When you see us, we can take a look at any medications you share with us to help determine the cause, as well help you with steps to ensure you are careful and protective of your teeth. We can also potentially suggest a prescription-strength fluoride gel that can help prevent dental decay.

Before you come in to see your dentist, be sure to also:

  • Avoid drinks with caffeine which can further dry the mouth out
  • Drink water and sugarless drinks
  • If you have a humidifier, use it at night
  • Avoid tobacco and alcohol which dry out the mouth
  • Be careful with spicy or salty foods which can cause pain in a dry mouth

Want to know more about Hagen Dental? Visit us here or give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Happy National Dentist Day

Friday, March 6th, 2015

It’s our kind of day today! We hope you have a day full of smiles.

Hagen Dental Cincinnati Happy National Dentist Day

Dr. Hagen, DDS Has Been Named as One of Cincinnati’s Top Doctors

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Top Dentist in Cincinnati

Cincinnati Magazine approached more than 5,000 physicians and asked them the question: who would you turn to if you, a family member, or a friend needed medical attention?

And the result? Dr. Hagen has been selected as a Top Doctor in Cincinnati, Ohio by his peers!

So what are the just a few of the reasons Dr. Hagen is a Top Dentist in Ohio?

  • Dr. Hagen and all of the Hagen Dental team are dedicated to your total health. That approach is reflected in our warm and welcoming atmosphere. Ask Hagen Dental patients and they’ll tell you how your visit will be both comfortable and enjoyable. We’re always smiling here in the Hagen Dental office!
  • Dr. Hagen is passionate about oral care. Dr. Hagen continues his postgraduate education on an ongoing basis, and he is committed to offering the latest and greatest services to patients. (Did you know that Dr. Hagen attended St. Xavier High School and Xavier University before earning his dental degree from The Ohio State University School of Dentistry?)
  • Dr. Hagen is connected to the community. Just a few of the ways Dr. Hagen is involved in the community include his role as president of the Greater Cincinnati Dental Study Club, and a member of the American Dental Association, Ohio Dental Association, and Cincinnati Dental Society. Dr. Hagen and his wife Jennifer have six beautiful children and you can often find Dr. Hagen cycling in the Cincinnati area.
  • Think quality and a caring approach. Hagen Dental Practice involves you in decision-making, and we fully inform you about what you (or your children) need to know as it relates to your dental care. From one-visit crowns to CEREC to Zoom! Whitening, we want you to be fully informed and completely confident as you take care of your health.
  • Dr. Hagen has extensive experience. Dr. Hagen has in-depth knowledge about sleep dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, crown and bridge restorations, CEREC, and much, much more. Dr. Hagen constantly evaluates emerging dental methods and technology so that our patients have the best results, all in the least invasive manner.

Find out more about Hagen Dental Practice.

How Much Do Straight Teeth Really Matter?

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

invisalign at Hagen Dental CincinnatiWhat’s the first thing people notice about someone else’s appearance?

If you guessed someone’s smile, then you are right. Our smile is usually the first thing someone else notices when they first see us. Beyond having that healthy smile that can look great, there are quite a few other benefits of having straight teeth that can leave us feeling great as well. Here are some of those benefits:

Improved self-concept.

Having straightened teeth impacts how we actually think and view ourselves. Beyond just vanity or increased confidence, crooked teeth can cause speech impediments, or just make us extremely self-conscious.

How straight our teeth are also impacts how we are perceived as well.

Did you know that people who have straight teeth are perceived as more successful, smarter and as having more dates? Having straight teeth also means you are more likely to be hired! You can see why how other people’s perceptions of us help shape our social and psychological wellbeing.

Increased ability to clean teeth.

Overlapping teeth can trap food particles, whereas straight, aligned teeth can mean the surface area is easier to both brush and floss effectively. Straighter teeth also translate to an easier and more smooth flossing and brushing experience—which means we’re also more likely to brush and floss each day. Talk about a win-win!

Overall healthier teeth and gums.

When we have teeth that stick out or protrude, these teeth are more likely to break or see cracks. Additionally, overly crowded teeth can wear unevenly, and this uneven wear can result in headaches. Crooked teeth can push against the soft tissues we have in our mouth, making cuts, sores, and infections more likely. Last, if we’re better able to fight bacteria build-up with straighter, more properly aligned teeth, we’re also better able to avoid gum disease.

“I’m ready for straighter, more symmetrical teeth.”

You’re ready for the chance to smile with confidence. Or maybe your teeth have just moved as you’ve grown older, and you’re ready to do something about it. One of the reasons Invisalign is popular is that the aligners used are nearly invisible. These clear aligners are also removable, and you can still eat food as you normally would.

Here are a few of the top things to know about Invisalign—whether you are a teen or adult:

  • You’re able to continue to floss and brush like normal (just take off your aligners!)
  • Trays are smooth and comfortable, and easy to take off
  • Ideal for a busy person
  • Fast and convenient compared to other methods of teeth straightening; typical people use a new aligner every two weeks

With our mouth being a window to the health of our entire body, it is no wonder that our smile says so much about us. Ready to learn more about Invisalign? Contact us to hear more about why parents, teens, and even brides are so excited about using Invisalign.

Sources:

  • http://www.invisalign.com/news-and-events/2012/straight-teeth-study
  •  http://keltonglobal.com/invisalign-smile-study
  • http://www.sharecare.com/health/dental-oral-health-teeth/health-guide/dental-health-teeth-gums-mouth/straighten-teeth-with-adult-orthodontics

Everything You Need to Know About the Gum Disease Antibiotic, ARESTIN

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is a bacterial infection. Gum disease can do damage to our gums, tissue, and even the bone around our teeth. When we lose and destruct the tissue and bone in this way, pockets tend to form around our teeth. This is when ARESTIN can be utilized to better the health of your mouth and gumline.

What is ARESTIN?

ARESTIN is an antibiotic you can receive through your dentist. ARESTIN works to kill the bacteria—right at the root of the problem—without any pain.

ARESTIN is made up of the antibiotic known as minocycline hydrochloride; this is what kills your bacteria, over time, so that your gums can heal quicker and more effectively than they would otherwise.

Why use ARESTIN?

As you know, bacteria is what causes gum disease and bacteria often build up around our gumline. ARESTIN is a targeted gum disease treatment that directly helps this combat this buldup. We would tell you if you were a candidate for this treatment.

In other words, ARESTIN is just one more proactive way you can reverse the damage and prevent future damage to your mouth.

How does ARESTIN work?

Getting ARESTIN is an easy process. Your dentist will place ARESTIN in the pockets below your gumline, which lets you have an optimal potency right where you need the treatment. After that point, your dentist will tell you if you need more treatments, and how often.

What happens after my ARESTIN treatment?

ARESTIN will dissolve on its own so there is no removal required. You’ll also want to keep any other future appointments we have with you to make sure your gums are as healthy as possible.

Arestin and other technology at Hagen DentalOnce your gums have been treated, you want to maintain a good oral health routine. For about 10 days, it is best to avoid using floss or any kind of picks that are normally used to clean between the teeth. We will discuss these, and other guidelines for taking care of your teeth when using ARESTIN with each individual person.

In general, after those first 10 days, this may mean we need to get in the habit of regular, daily flossing. It also means keeping up with your regular brushing habits. We can help you with other decisions that can help your oral health, and overall health. Ready to treat your gum disease head on? Tell us you are interested in this antibiotic today.

Sources:

Top Tips to Avoid a Dental Emergency During the Holidays

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

The winter holidays are a time filled with family, gift giving, and a time to enjoy some of our favorite foods and treats. During this season, we also see a few common food offenders that can result in dental emergencies.

Take a look at the biggest offenders:

1. Popcorn.

Maybe you’ve snacked on Grandma’s caramel popcorn, or even received some gourmet popcorn as a gift. Either way, popcorn makes the list because of the “shells” that seem to wedge their way into hard-to-reach areas near and around your gum. Sometimes we don’t even know a “shell” is in our gumline or between our teeth. Also, popcorn can be problematic because of the risk of chomping down on a piece that has not fully popped. Imagine how we can shock the teeth as we bite down—pretty hard in many cases—on what the mouth feels is soft food. Unknowingly, we can come across a hard, un-popped piece, and crack or damage our teeth in the process. If you do have to eat your share of caramel popcorn this year, try to be careful as you chew. Also be sure to floss and brush after to remove those “shells” that you might not even realize are in or around your gum and teeth.

hagen dental dental emergencies 2. Baguettes or Biscotti.

It’s no secret that many people like to indulge in pastries during this time of the year. The only problem when you sink your teeth into a hard or extra crisp pastry, is that you run the risk of cracking or damaging your teeth as a result. Just think of it as one hard surface hitting another hard surface. Aim to make sure your bites are small so you don’t compromise your fillings. Sometimes ensuring you do not eat your pastry too fast can also help.

 3. Sticky and gooey desserts and candies.

Peanut brittle anyone? Or maybe it’s that bowl of jelly beans laying out at the office party? Or maybe Grandmas’ brownies with caramel on top? Whatever your favorite winter or holiday treat is, often times it’s something gooey or sticky! Realize these hard or sticky substances can stick to your teeth, and then pull out (or partially remove) a crown, bridge, or a filling. Other treats can actually get stuck in between your teeth. If you eat any of these this holiday season, continue your good oral hygiene habits, including brushing your teeth and flossing.

4. Jerky or other “tough” snack meats.

Even though our teeth’s enamel is extremely strong, we still get ourselves into trouble when we snack on chewy, dry meats—most notably beef or turkey jerky. Sometimes people can be guilty of treating their teeth as if they were determined to rip apart a piece of tough jerky. Well, our teeth can’t be treated like tools. They may be strong, but we still shouldn’t be reckless as we eat. Instead, look to savor food, which means chewing and biting off smaller size bites. If your jerky is too tough to eat comfortably, you know you might have to look for a more tender kind of meat to snack on.

This year for the holidays, be mindful as you select your holiday treats—meaning what you choose to eat, and how you go about eating it!

Did the Pilgrims and Native Americans Have Good Oral Hygiene Habits?

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

Pilgrims and Native Americans Oral health

Back in 1620, when the Mayflower landed on the shores of Cape Cod, people did not have the access, or information, that we have in terms of our overall health and wellbeing. In fact, the life expectancy of people during this time was anywhere between 35 and 40 years, on average. Today our average life expectancy is around 78.

Oral hygiene routines were much different for our ancestors.

Today we call the settlers who landed on Plymouth Harbor the Pilgrim Fathers, or simply the Pilgrims. Back then, the pilgrims did not have toothpaste, or even what we’d recognize as a toothbrush (more on that to come!). In fact these two core components of good oral hygiene habits had not entirely been refined yet. Nylon toothbrushes were only created in the 1930s and fluoride-enriched toothpaste came in the 1950s.

Having a reliable way to clean teeth would have been a luxury then, although Pilgrims did learn some from the Native Americans.

Pilgrims would use salt, sticks or other objects they had access to in order to do their best to clean their teeth. According to some historians, some even used hog’s hair, or other animal hair, to make what would resemble a toothbrush.

These brushes were an effort to try to clean at the buildup on their teeth. Knowing all of this, it probably wouldn’t surprise you to know that Pilgrims faced mouths full of decay!

How did Native Americans Compare to the Pilgrims When it Came to Dental Health?

Compared to Pilgrims, it has been reported the Native Americans had less plaque and dental decay, generally speaking.

Some Native American tribes took care of their teeth by using combinations of herbs and sage—they used these in ways comparable to how we use toothbrushes today. Also, a tarragon and sage combination worked as a breath freshener for the Native Americans. It’s also been recorded that certain Native American tribes took the Cucacua plant and made a paste that was used in a way similar to our current-day toothpaste.

And what else contributed to the difference in oral health between the two groups?

Diet! Recall that these first Pilgrims had just come across the Atlantic, on a ship where they had relied on food that could be preserved as long as possible. Compare that to how Native Americans were maintaining a steady diet off the land, or more of what we might see as whole foods today. When you compare the salted dried meat, dried fruits and hardtack (the Pilgrims’ diet) to that of meat, nuts, berries, and other vegetables (the Native Americans’ diet), you can see why the Native Americans were better at combating gingivitis and tooth decay.

You can see how far we’ve come since the time of the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Indians’ harvest celebration, or what we know of as the “first Thanksgiving.” We know one thing: we sure are thankful this Thanksgiving to have good teeth care in reach!

How Acid Reflux Can Damage Your Teeth

Saturday, November 15th, 2014

Dental erosion: it’s when acids wear away at the enamel on our teeth.

Eating lots of acidic foods is one of the major reasons we see erosion. Once this erosion occurs, the teeth can look shiny and a bit deficient compared to the parts of our teeth that do not have erosion.

When we lose or damage our enamel, it cannot be brought back. This erosion is a problem because our enamel is what gives our teeth their structure, and shape. We then see the underlying dentin being exposed.

Hagen Dental DDS BlogIt’s safe to say that most of us want to avoid any loss of tooth structure. So what are some signs you may have tooth erosion? Here are a few:

  • Sensitivity
  • Change in tooth form/shape
  • Cracks in the edges of teeth
  • Small dent-like appearances on your teeth
  • Discoloration
  • “Transparent” looking teeth

Knowing that acid reflux directly contributes to teeth erosion, let’s examine acid reflux a bit more.

What’s acid reflux and how does it happen?
We have a muscular ring between the end of our esophagus and our stomach. This ring is what helps keep our day-to-day stomach acid within the stomach, where it helps us digest properly. In some situations, this sphincter muscle does not work as it should, and as a result, our stomach acid comes up into our esophagus. (Sometimes you’ll hear this muscle called the LES, short for the lower esophageal sphincter muscle.)

But is this muscle all to blame as the cause of acid reflux? The answers is that as much as 90 percent of most heartburn cases are due to the foods/beverages we eat, meaning that for many of us, we are able to avoid or keep our heartburn to a minimum.

Besides being a major culprit for teeth erosion, acid reflux also contributes to bad breath. That’s just one more reason to be aware of how we to work to avoid acid reflux.

One of the ways to avoid tooth erosion (and of course the discomfort) that come with acid reflux is to look at the foods you are eating, as well as when you are eating them.

Although it varies from person to person, we compiled a list of some of the biggest offenders.

  • Meats, with especially acid sauces or chicken/buffalo wings
  • Grains, especially those with tomato sauces added
  • Dairy, including sour cream and even ice cream
  • Specialty drinks such as coffee, liquor, wine or tea
  • Fats, certain oils, and sweets. This can be chocolate, donuts, butter cookies, or even potato chips.

This list shows that across all categories of food, we can find highly acid foods and drinks that can contribute to acid reflux.

So what’s missing from this list?

You guessed it: juices, fruits, and vegetables. Most of us recognize how orange juice, lemons, lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, tomato or raw onions are some of the foods that are also on this list.

In general, look to neutralize the acid in your stomach when acid reflux does occur, and also be sure to tell us if you are having a problem. If you do have extreme gastric-related issues, or a chronic problem with acid reflux, we can also help. Also be sure to tell us if you smoke, since that’s a major contributor to acid reflux that leads to teeth erosion for many people. Link to hagendds.com

Look to cut back on the number of acidic foods you are snacking on throughout the day. This way, you are minimizing the amount of time acid is exposed to your teeth.