Phone (513) 251-5500

Posts Tagged ‘cincinnati ohio dentist reviews’

Genes & Your Teeth: What Did You Inherit From Your Mother?

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

Mother’s Day is fast approaching. And while we love to spend this day in celebration for all our mothers have done for us over the years, one can’t help but wonder… What genetic features did I inherit from my mom – both “good” AND “bad”?

Features That ARE Related To Genes

Genes play a major role in the size and layout of your jaw. This means things like overcrowding of teeth, gaps, overbites, underbites and other misalignment issues can run in the family (1).

Gum disease, though not completely controlled by genetics, does seem to have a hereditary factor. Basically, some people in the population are more predisposed and are naturally at a higher risk for inflamed gums than others (1,2). Like any genetic predisposition, it does NOT guarantee your fate. It just means you might have to work a little harder than others. Proper hygiene habits can still keep gum disease at bay, so keep up your healthy dental behaviors!

cincinnati dentist

The color of your teeth is in part related to genetics. Genes play a role in the tint of your teeth, as well as how likely your teeth are to becoming stained. This is because the porous nature of the enamel is an inheritable trait. The more porous your enamel, the more likely stains can occur. Keep in mind that lifestyle and dietary choices will also play a factor here. Drinks like coffee, tea and red wine, along with certain medications can change the color of your teeth (3).

Problems That Are NOT Related To Genes

Although it’s tempting to blame our dental problems on our parents, things like cavities, decay, and gum disease from poor dental habits are more a lifestyle factor than a heredity issue. Anyone can develop cavities, decay, and inflammation in their mouth if they don’t stick to regular and proper oral hygiene practices.

Oral cancer is only minimally related to genetics, so if this one runs in your family, don’t stress. Lifestyle choices such as tobacco and alcohol use are the top risk factors for oral cancer. This means you can help prevent oral cancers by quitting tobacco, cutting back on alcohol, and eating a balanced diet (1).

Take Control: What You Can Do

Be thankful for traits and characteristics that you inherited that you love. After all, these are things that make you uniquely you!

Accept things you cannot change, and investigate options for the things you can. If crooked teeth or misalignments run in your family, ask us about corrective techniques such as Invisalign. If you are unhappy with the color tint of your teeth, talk to us about cosmetic dental procedures to whiten the enamel safely.

Keep your stress low. Taking steps to reduce your stress levels can positively impact your overall health, as well as the health of your teeth and mouth, which will minimize inflammation and disease (2).

No matter what your age or dental health history, start taking your proper dental hygiene habits seriously today! This is the best way to prevent more issues in the future and keep your teeth and mouth healthy for the rest of your life.

healthy teeth tips

Poor oral hygiene increases your risk for dental issues and oral disease no matter what your genetics. Although some individuals are more predisposed to develop tooth decay and issues than others, no one is immune from taking good care of their teeth. This means regular flossing and brushing, plenty of hydration, regular dental checkups, and reducing your overall sugar intake.

These habits and lifestyle choices play a much larger role in the long term outcome of your oral health than the genes you inherited from Mom or Dad. So let Mom off the hook this weekend, and have fun celebrating!

Call Hagen Dental Practice Today

Ready to schedule your next checkup? Or have a question about Invisalign, dental health, or teeth whitening services? We are here for you! Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

1. https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/are-oral-health-issues-genetic.html

2. http://www.rdhmag.com/articles/print/volume-20/issue-1/feature/genetics-periodontal-disease.html

3. https://www.newbeauty.com/hottopic/blogpost/6038-ask-an-expert-do-genetics-make-your-teeth-more-prone-to-stains/

 

Oral Health: Does It Have An Updated Meaning Today?

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

oral health hagen dental in cincinnati

The World Dental Federation is a worldwide organization for the dental profession, representing over a million dentists across the globe! It’s called the FDI for short, because it was established in Paris as the “Fédération dentaire international” (1).

It’s now located in Geneva, Switzerland. Each year, approximately 300 delegates meet to discuss issues, debate changes, and define the future of dentistry across the world. These members are representatives from over 200 national dental associations and over 130 specialist groups from various countries. One of the missions of the FDI is to “promote optimal oral and general health for all peoples” (2, 3).

Earlier this month, the World Dental Federation launched an updated definition of the term “oral health.”

The term “oral” refers to all the components of your mouth and oral cavity: The teeth, gums, connective tissues, jaw bones, soft palate, mucosal tissue of the mouth and throat, tongue, lips, chewing muscles, salivary glands and the branches of the immune, nervous and vascular systems that supply, protect and nourish these tissues. That part hasn’t changed!

The FDI wanted to bring the definition up to contemporary standards by designating oral health as an integral part of an individual’s general health and well-being. The new definition was created by the Federation’s “Vision 2020 Think Tank”, which includes experts from oral health backgrounds, public health officials, and health economics experts (3).

So What Has Changed?

So what is the main differences between the old definition and the new definitions being used—and why does it matter?

Dr. Michael Click, co-chair of the FDI’s Vision 2020 Think Tank explains: “The old definition lacked a theoretical framework that made assessment and evaluation of oral health hard to measure,” he said. “Furthermore, this new definition moves dentistry from treating disease to treating a person with disease.” He went on to say they created a new definition so it could resonate with more people.

The intention is that more people will be able to understand concepts related to our oral health!

These changes might seem subtle, but they do have big significance. Oral health does not occur in isolation…in other words, the health of your teeth, gums, and entire mouth are a part of and acutely related to, your overall health. These new definitions help to clarify and validate that!

In summary, the main points, as defined by the World Dental Federation:

  1. Oral health is multifaceted. A “healthy smile” is more than being “cavity-free” and we agree with that, too! It includes the ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow and express emotion through facial movements. It means being able to do these things confidently and without pain, discomfort or disease.
  2. Oral health is a fundamental part of health, including both physical and mental wellbeing. Another area we agree with! Oral health and our overall health is influenced by the values attitudes of individuals and communities. This means that although oral health is always important—even if the quality of care varies depending on what country you live!
  3. Oral health is a reflection of the physiological, social, and psychological factors that are essential to the quality of life. That’s a mouthful, but also true! The point is: oral health is engrained in more facets of our lives than we may realize.
  4. Oral health is influenced by a person’s experiences, perceptions, expectations and ability to adapt to circumstances. Our overall health affects our oral health, just as our oral health has effect on our overall health (3).
    oral-health-quote

This broadened definition of oral health serves to update the definition to a complete state of physical, mental and social well-being, rather than just the absence of disease or health issue.

It embodies our understanding that everything in the body is intrinsically connected: oral health and general health go hand in hand, rather than being two separate concepts.

What does this mean for you? You cannot be truly healthy without good oral health! This puts enormous importance on good oral hygiene, positive lifestyle habits, and regular dental visits. At Hagen Dental Practice, we strive to help you achieve oral health, with the understanding that it helps you maintain and enhance your overall health.

We Can’t Wait to Meet You & Your Family

Don’t delay your visit. Early detection saves lives. Call us today to schedule an appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Sources/References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FDI_World_Dental_Federation
  2. http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/members_partners/member_list/fdi/en/
  3. http://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2016-archive/september/fdi-adopts-new-definition
  4. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/SurgeonGeneral/sgr/chap1.htm

 

What to Know About Oral Cancer, Eating Disorders & Decalcification

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

eating disorders and oral health

More than 10 million Americans are affected by serious eating disorders. These disorders can have serious ramifications for your overall health, as well as your oral health!2

A Serious Subject: Eating Disorders & Your Health

Two of the most common eating disorders are bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa. Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by repeated, excessive eating, followed by self-induced vomiting, also known as purging. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by an extreme fear of gaining weight, a desire to be thin, self-induced starvation, and the inability to maintain a normal weight.

Both conditions deprive the body of crucial vitamins, minerals, proteins and other nutrients required to maintain good health, including oral health. These deficiencies can lead to decalcification of the teeth.3

Decalcification is an early form of tooth decay and damage that can lead to further injuries or breakdown of teeth, more serious tooth decay, and cavities.

Eating disorders can also cause bad breath, tenderness of the mouth and throat, as well as swelling in the salivary glands. These disorders can lead to dry mouth, cracked lips, sores in the mouth, bleeding gums, and sensitivity of the teeth.1,2

The self-induced vomiting that occurs with bulimia nervosa causes powerful digestive acids from the stomach (that normally aren’t found in the mouth) to come in contact with the teeth. This acid attacks and wears away at the tooth enamel, causing erosion. This frequent purging can also change the color, shape, or even length of the teeth!1

Those with anorexia nervosa can experience osteoporosis and severe malnutrition, leading to weakening of the bones. This includes weakening of the jaw bone as well as weakening of the teeth and enamel, or even tooth breakage or loss.1

Long-Term Negative Health Effects

Long term malnutrition from eating disorders can lead to increased susceptibility to infections and other negative health effects.

The repeated vomiting of bulimia can damage the lining of the esophagus because of the repeated contact with the strong stomach acid and the micro-traumas of the tissue associated with the purging. A very small percentage of bulimics can develop bulimia-related cancer due to the damage to the esophagus.4

What to Know About Oral Cancer

Concerned about oral cancer? Early warning signs include lumps or growths in the mouth, throat or neck, patchy areas or lesions in the tissues of the mouth, hoarseness or difficulty swallowing, unusual bleeding, or persistent sores that don’t heal. Recall that when you come in for your regular visit, we look for signs of cancer—after all, we’re trained to do so.

Prevention and regular dental checkups are key when it comes to proper oral health as well as preventing oral cancer! Additionally, a healthy, nourishing diet is important to give your mouth and teeth the building blocks it needs to stay healthy.

prevention at hagen dds practice in cincinnati

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

If you or someone you know suffers from an eating disorder, it is important that you seek professional help as soon as possible. Overcoming the eating disorder is the first step to healing the effects of the acid and nutrient deficiencies that come along with these conditions.

We can help you restore and work with some of the problems created from eating disorders (and that’s part of why we want to know about your health history, too.) Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

References/Sources:

  1. http://www.yourdentistryguide.com/eating-disorder/
  2. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/Teens/concerns
  3. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/decalcification
  4. http://www.bulimiahelp.org/articles/bulimia-and-cancer-what-you-need-know
  5. http://www.atooth.com/oral-cancer/

 

What to Know About Composite Fillings

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

what to know about composite fillings

What happens when you visit the dentist for a filling?

To start, often times you may be given local anesthesia so that the area can be numbed. Generally, the next step will be to remove the decay from your actual tooth!

During this stage a drill or a laser may be used. Once this decay is removed, it’s time to shape the space and prepare it for your filling.

Depending on the filling, the preparation will vary. There are many options available today for fillings, with the most common including gold, porcelain, silver amalgam, glass ionomer, zinc oxide and eugenol, composite resin fillings.

Composite Resin Fillings

So what are composite resin fillings – and why is it called “composite resin”?

It’s referred to as composite resin because the material consists of a combination of glass and tooth-colored plastic and other materials. Composite fillings are commonly used to reshape disfigured teeth in the mouth or as a material to bond to your teeth – with the benefit being that they can match the exact color of your existing teeth.

Because composites can bond to your teeth, they can help support your remaining tooth structure, which can help prevent further breakage on teeth. It can also be used as a “buffer” on the tooth, serving to insulate your tooth from temperature change. People like composite resin fillings because they can look so natural in the mouth.

composite fillings hagen dental cincinnati dentist

But back to the process of getting a filling: at this stage, depending on the kind of filling, sometimes a base is placed to protect your nerves. Often times that is made of composite resin!

After a few more steps, certain fillings will be hardened using light applied to the area. Once the material has hardened, you’re almost ready to go. After shaping and polishing, your composite is placed.

cosmetic dentistrySo how do you know what kind of filling is right for you?

There are many factors that help your dentist know what kind of filling is right for you. These factors include:

  • The size of the decay
  • The location of the decay in the mouth
  • Aesthetics
  • Bonding to your tooth structure
  • Versatility (for example, if used for broken or chipped teeth)
  • Other health and lifestyle factors

From simple fillings to full crowns to veneers, CEREC is also an option that many people turn to – again – depending on the specific needs of the situation. Keep in mind we can help you decide what’s best for you based on the extent of the decay, aesthetics, durability, your insurance, and of course how the option is suited for your mouth.

Before you have the need for any fillings, aim for prevention. Brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss every day and visit Dr. Hagen regularly.

natural looking fillings cincinnati dentist

Sources/References

9 Famous Toothpaste Slogans That’ll Make You Smile

Sunday, April 24th, 2016

Think you know toothpaste? How many of these taglines do you recognize?

1. “Brings Mouths to Life”

1

2. “Look Ma, No Cavities”

2

3. “Clean to the Extreme”

3

4. “No One Will Ever Know”

4

5. “The Fountain of Youth”

5

6. “Gets You Noticed”

6

7. “Take AIM at Cavities”

7

8. “Brusha…brusha…brusha”

8

9. “Until They Gleem”

9

Source/References:

http://www.buckybeaver.ca/buckys_story.php

http://www.thinkslogans.com/slogans/advertising-slogans/toothepaste-slogans/

All About the Grinch’s Teeth

Monday, December 14th, 2015

all about the grinchs teeth

You’ve likely heard of, seen, or read How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

The Christmastime classic features one of the most well-known and memorable protagonists, a grouch living in Whoville called the Grinch. Arguably, the Grinch is one of the most well-known characters created by Dr. Seuss.

Living high up on a mountain with his dog Max, the Grinch hates Christmas and everything that comes with the holiday season.

The Grinch appeared in the comic and in Seussical the Musical, a sort of combination of Seuss’s most famous books, where he was played by Patrick Page. More famously, in 2000, in the movie How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Jim Carrey played the infamous role of Mr. Grinch.

Not-So-Nice Teeth: An Anti-Hero with a Scheming Smile

One could say that the Grinch is sneaky, grumpy, sly, foul-smelling, heart-lacking, and downright cruel…but his teeth aren’t so nice, either!

The Grinch’s teeth have been a much-talked about point of discussion, being that in Seuss’ book, published in 1957, his teeth do not show. Yet in the comic, he has a horrible smile, and in the movie with Carrey, his smile is enough to make viewers squirm!

According to the Internet Movie Database (IMDb), to get Carrey to have such a horrible smile, and for him to look so mischievous and mean, it was no easy feat. In fact, it took Carrey about 3-8 hours to apply his makeup for the role…each and every day on set! It’s said he was so uncomfortable in the skin he was required to put on, he needed help from a Navy SEAL who taught him torture-resistant techniques so that he could cope while filming.

The set of teeth he wore were made to look like gnarled and dirty “animal teeth.” They were misaligned, very yellow, and it appeared that the Grinch had surely never flossed! Kind of hard to believe these fake teeth were later auctioned off!

Carrey’s false teeth were part of the reason why Carrey spoke the way he did in the movie, with some thinking his words had a “Sean Connery-like” quality to them, as reported by Jim Carrey Online. Besides the overall suit and makeup discomfort he experienced, there was so much makeup on Carrey he really couldn’t breathe through his nose. Talk about dedication to the role!

“You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch…”

While the Grinch undoubtedly had a smile that could send shivers down your spine, it’s also debated whether or not the Grinch had a termite problem…in his mouth, that is! Thanks to “The Grinch Song” from the comic, there is a theory that says the Grinch had such poor oral hygiene that he had termites in his mouth.

 Image credit: thegoretorium.tumblr.com

Image credit: thegoretorium.tumblr.com

Many of us are familiar with, the lyrics say that say, “You’re a mean one, Mr Grinch…” The humorous song says that Mr. Grinch is bad banana with a greasy, black peal!

“You’re a monster, Mr Grinch. Your heart’s an empty hole. Your brain is full of spiders, You’ve got garlic in your soul…”

If you listen carefully, the famous tune even calls the Grinch vile: “You’re a vile one, Mr. Grinch. You have termites in your smile.”

Could This Be Why He’s So Grumpy & Why He Wants to Be Left Alone?

Not only do some swear he had termites in his mouth, but there is another theory (perhaps originating from a dentist) that the Grinch was in such a bad mood because he had such horrible teeth pain, or even TMJ. TMJ is short for temporomandibular joint disorder, which is when muscles, bones, teeth, and nerves of your jaw system do not work together as they should. Maybe it was the stress he put on himself, maybe it was his poor bite, his bad habits over time, or maybe he had a serious bruxism problem that led to TMJ. We may never know!

“Then the Grinch thought of something he hadn’t before! What if Christmas, he thought, doesn’t come from a store. What if Christmas…perhaps…means a little bit more!” 

This holiday season, we wish you and your family health, happiness and joy. Give us a call today at 513.251.5500 or visit us online to learn more about setting up your next appointment with us. We can’t wait to hear from you.

Sources and References

 

Why You Shouldn’t Ignore Bleeding Gums

Monday, December 7th, 2015

dentist in cincinnati_gingivitis

Have you ever noticed that your gums are bleeding when you brush or floss?

We’re here to tell you that if your gums are bleeding, it’s not something to ignore. In this blog, we examine why your gums may start to bleed, and when it’s time to give us a call to come in for a visit.

The First Stage of Gum Disease

The first stage of gum disease is Gingivitis. Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gum tissue caused by bacteria.

What are the signs of Gingivitis?

Signs and symptoms of gingivitis include red, swollen, tender gums that may bleed when you brush. Another sign of gum disease is gums that have receded or pulled away from your teeth, giving your teeth an elongated appearance.

The signs of Gingivitis include red and swollen gums, and even blood blisters that have formed in the pocket of your gum tissue. When those blood blisters are broken during flossing or brushing, you then see your gums bleed. Even though this might sound painful, it actually isn’t always associated with pain—but that’s why it’s important to know the signs of early gum disease so you don’t just ignore it or just think you have tender gums.

Does that mean you shouldn’t be flossing if you notice that your gums are bleeding when you do?

Of course it doesn’t mean you should stop flossing! Flossing cleans more than one third of your total tooth surface area, and it also stimulates your gum. If you do have bleeding, don’t stop brushing or flossing…instead, make a visit with your dentist so we can better determine the cause and what we can do to prevent further build-up and decay.

Risk Factors and the Cause of Gum That Bleed

There can be multiple reasons why people can have gums that bleed. If your gums bleed more than just once or you are pregnant and are experiencing problems, it’s time to take note. Give us a call and be ready to let us know of any medications you are on, since medications can result in temporary gum bleeding. You and your dentist can then discuss other risk factors such as your oral habits (tobacco use, etc.) hormonal changes, your diet and nutrition, stress, mouth breathing and more. 

And What Happens If I Do Nothing?

If you ignore your bleeding gums, as time continues, assuming your dental habits also don’t improve, the bacteria in your mouth will continue to grow. The bacteria then damages the gum tissue around your teeth as it continues to thrive. In this stage, the pockets are deeper and the gum disease will worsen.

Remember, if your gum is bleeding, it’s not normal.

You don’t want gum disease—after all, it’s the leading cause of tooth loss. In some cases, as your gum disease worsens, your gums will look puffy or swollen. You can also have a bad taste in your mouth thanks to the pus coming from gum pockets. Last, you might even notice you have bad breath, even directly after you brush! Consistent bad breath can be due to food that gets trapped deep in your gum pockets.

As gum disease worsens, you can even experience pain when you chew. It’s not just a problem in your mouth where the plaque is irritating your gum tissue; gum disease also leads to an inflammatory response throughout your body, putting you at more risk for systemic illnesses.

Don’t Compromise Your Health

In short, flossing, brushing, and coming in for regular dental exams and cleaning is a combination that helps you prevent gum bleeding, gum disease, and losing any of your teeth as a result of that gum disease! This isn’t always easy: in fact, one out of every two adults over 30 has some form of periodontal disease, according to recent findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Although different for each person and we recommend seeing your dentist for your specific recommendations, here are some tips to consider if you want to boost your oral hygiene:

  • If you only brush and floss your teeth twice a day (morning and night), consider adding in a third brush and floss near or around mid-day.
  • If you seem to brush your teeth too hard (or your dentist has indicated you brush your teeth too hard,) look into a soft bristle or even an electric toothbrush.
  • Start rewarding yourself in some small but meaningful way for consistent flossing and good oral hygiene habits.
  • Avoid cigarettes and tobacco.

Our key takeaway: if your gums are bleeding, you need to know the reason why.

If you were bleeding somewhere else on your body—say your knee or hand—you’d take notice and do something about it…Be sure to take action if your gums are bleeding and let us know right away.

Top 15 Hagen Dental Testimonials

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

We are very proud of patients’ satisfaction. While difficult to narrow down to just 15, here are some of our top patient reactions we wanted to share with you.

  1. “The Best Dental Care”

“Hagen Dental has given me the best dental care I’ve ever had. I’m just sorry I didn’t discover them sooner.” – Barb

  1. “…Couldn’t Be Happier!”

“I have been a patient at Hagen Dental Practice for 6+ years, and couldn’t be happier! Whenever you go into the office it’s always clean and inviting. The staff is friendly and treats you like family whether you’ve been a patient for years or a new patient. I would recommend this dentist to anyone new to town or just looking for a cange in dentistry. You can’t go wrong!” – Lauren O.

  1. “The Best Care”

“I couldn’t be happier with Dr. Hagen and the wonderful staff at Hagen Dental Practice. I lost my front tooth at 24 years old and everyone gave the best care to remedy the situation.” – Dani

  1. “Family Friendly Atmosphere with Leading Edge Dental Technology”

“I’ve been with Hagen Dental since Dr. Hagen took over the practice a long time ago, and I continue to rave about their ability to combine the friendly family atmosphere of the entire staff with leading edge dental technology. I live over 25 miles away, but wouldn’t think of trusting my care to anyone but Hagen Dental.” – Ron J.

  1. “I Always Brag About the Entire Staff…”

“When I come here I feel like a celebrity, important. I always brag about the entire staff. Definitely satisfied.” – Ken

  1. “I Enjoy My Smile Due to Hagen Dental”

“I have been very happy at Hagen Dental. They have a friendly and experienced staff and I enjoy my smile due to Hagen Dental.” – George

  1. “You Will Love Them Too”

“Hagen Dental Practice is great! I’m greeted with smiles as soon as I walk in the door.   I have been seeing Dr Hagen for a long time now and he is very easy to talk to about any concerns I may have. He makes procedures as painless as possible and is very good with any special needs I may have. I’m 68 and still have all my teeth including a baby tooth that I never lost. I attribute my good dental health to Dr Hagen and all of his caring staff. If you are looking for a good dentist try Hagen Dental Practice. I’m sure you will love them too.” Dianne L.

  1. “Every Person Goes that Extra Mile”

“I just left from my first experience with Dr. Hagen and his team. This is one of those rare places where EVERY person you come in contact with is friendly, knowledgeable and goes that extra mile to make make you feel welcome. Thanks so much for a wonderful appointment. I already know I’ve made a great choice by coming here.” – Darren H.

  1. “State of the Art”

“I’ve been a patient for a number of years. The staff is very accommodating and friendly. The equipment is state of the art. Enjoy making visits.” – Diane

  1. “I Have Been a Patient Here my Entire Life”

I have been a patient here my entire life and would not consider going to another dental practice. They have a great staff, great equipment, and Dr. Hagen is a great guy who really cares about his patients.” – Craig B.

  1. “Visits to the Dentist are a Pleasure”

“I have been a patient over 25 years. Dr. Hagen and all his staff are always professional, caring people. They help me take good care of my teeth. Visits to the dentist are a pleasure. They keep up with the latest in dental care. I don’t live in the area and drive across town to continue to be a patient.” – Regina

  1. “Like Seeing Old Friends”

“The comfortable atmosphere, friendly faces, and the personal references make the experience all the more enjoyable. Like seeing old friends!” – Penny

  1. “An Incredible Team with an Excellent Doctor”

“This is an incredible team with an excellent Doctor who really know what their doing but more importantly create comfort and care every step of the way. They are top notch. I recommend them wholly.” – Melinda H.

  1. “Helped Me Deal with Sleep Apnea”

“I just wanted to take a minute to thank Dr. Hagen and his staff for all their efforts in getting me caught up on my dental care. Thanks to your help I’ve finally got teeth and gums operating where they should be. The additional care getting me up with a dental appliance to deal with sleep apnea and snoring has made both my wife and me very happy!” – Ron

  1. “…The Latest Techniques & Technology”

“I always feel like I get the most up to date care possible with the latest techniques and technology. Dr. Hagen and his staff are always friendly and extremely competent!”– Mike

If you are ready to start going to the dentist regularly again, or if you simply need a new dentist, give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit us at hagendds.com

“Look Mom, No Cavities”: Here’s 10 Vintage Dental Ads You Don’t Want to Miss

Thursday, October 29th, 2015
5 times active

The promise of clean, fresh breath all day.

Tooth kit

Just look what 39 cents could get you in 1953!

acid fur

This one refers to “acid fur”!

baby ad

Can you believe this one?

do as your dentist

So direct!

duty

According to this ad, keeping you oral health up to par is what they call “keeping fit” and “America’s duty”!

Look mom no cavities advert

“No cavities!”

pass up the girl

Oh no! We don’t think we’d see this ad today! Here is one aimed at the ladies.

enamel

This Colgate ad talks about how nature can’t replace your enamel.

whiskey tooth paste

This ad is for genuine whiskey toothpaste!

These may be vintage ads, but we offer the latest, state-of-the-art technology and services at Hagen Dental. Learn more about our practice here and give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule an appointment.

Sources These Were Taken From:

  • http://www.smilegeneration.com/cerec

Meet Hagen Dental’s Newest Team Member, Brandi Stemen

Friday, September 18th, 2015

Hagen Dental Cincinnati West Side Dentist

Name: Brandi Stemen. Most my friends and family call e “Brandie Rae.” (Rae is my middle name.)

Role: I am an Expanded Functions Dental Assistant. I would describe my role not only as an EFDA, but as an assistant that can bring quality care to my patients. I love making my patients feel comfortable at all times while they are in the office and giving them a positive experience.

Favorite restaurant in Cincinnati: I have quite a few favorite restaurants in Cincinnati but I think my number one choice would be Wild Mikes (in Delhi).

How long you have lived in Cincinnati? In November, it will be 2 years. I a from a small town outside of Dayton, Ohio, so it was quite an adjustment moving to the big city but I love it.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? Some things I enjoy doing outside of work are spending time with my friends and family. I also enjoy attending Cincinnati sporting events such as UC football and basketball games, and Red’s games.

How would you describe the Hagen Dental team? The Hagen Dental team is a great team to work on. I knew the moment I walked into the office that I had to work here. The whole team is so warm, welcoming, and made me feel like I had been a part of the team for years. Everyone works as hard as they can to make the office run smoothly while providing quality care for our patients.

Hagen Dental is about total health. How do you stay healthy? To stay healthy, I focus on my fitness quite a bit which includes going to the gym 5-6 days a week. Everyone calls me crazy because I prefer to go to the gym before work so I wake up every morning at 4:30 AM.

What’s your favorite part of your job? My favorite part of my job would be the relationships I am able to build with my patients. I love getting to know my patients, and making them feel comfortable.

Finish this sentence: Hagen Dental patients… Will receive a lifetime of quality care when they step into our office.

Ready to come by our office and meet the Hagen Dental team? Visit our website to find out more or call (513) 251-5550 today. We can’t wait to meet you!