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The Future of Dentistry is Here!

Monday, March 27th, 2017

“Dentistry” as we know it has come a long way since its ancient origins. Over hundreds of years, oral care, dental knowledge, hygiene practices, cleaning and surgical procedures have developed into the modern day dental advances we know, enjoy and appreciate today.

As you know, Hagen Dental Practice is proud to offer the latest and greatest when it comes to today’s dental innovations!

dentistry innovations

A Long History Full of Improvements

Not surprisingly, the 20th century boasts some of the most meaningful innovations and advancements throughout this long history of dental practice. To start, the 20th century saw the standardization of operative procedures and instrumentation, as well as the improvement of dental training and text books.

Dental practices also started becoming more comfortable during this time. In 1905, a German chemist formulated the local anesthetic now known as Novocain that helps numb feeling in the tissues being worked on. Fifty years later, in 1958, a fully reclining dental chair was introduced to the profession, allowing patients to sit more comfortably during dental appointments.

We know how important it is to have a comfortable and relaxing environment when you come in to see us!

Along with better education for Dentists, the training of dental hygienists was also initiated and improved. Their practice of cleaning teeth was shown to greatly reduce the incidence of cavities among the children being worked on, which launched the dental hygienist movement to complement existing dental practices.

As the century continued, toothpaste and toothbrush quality saw improvements and changes. Nylon was introduced as material for toothbrush bristles, and fluoride was added to paste. New filling materials and bonding resins improved the outcomes of dental work. Lasers were approved for soft tissue work, and the first commercial electric toothbrush went to market.

Moving into Cosmetic Dentistry

In the late 1980’s, home tooth bleaching became a possibility with new commercial products offered on the market. During the 1990’s, dental care expanded to allow for cosmetic accommodations for patients, not just practical or essential dental work. Other innovations included new tooth-colored restorative materials, implants and veneers became available.

tech continues to advance in dentistry

Technology Continues To Enhance The Care We Provide You

In the 21st century, dental advancements and technology developments have not slowed down. We continue to see improvements for patient care, cleaning procedures, restorative processes and preventative care.

Several of these advancements have arisen in the way we perform imaging and cavity detection. At Hagen Dental, we are proud to utilize digital x-ray technology which offers a decreased amount of radiation to our patients, the removal of strong developing chemicals from our office, and faster, more reliable access to the images of your mouth.

We also use a Laser Scanner, which can detect smaller cavities up to years earlier than traditional x-ray and visual examination. This means finding the cause of sensitivity and pain earlier, and allowing more of your natural tooth to remain intact and in your mouth with earlier treatment.

The Best Clean Possible

New cleaning technological advances that are now available mean a better removal of plaque and calculus from your teeth. At Hagen Dental, we offer the best cleaning possible with the use of the Piezo Scaler to more quickly and effectively clean your teeth and gums thoroughly. This tool utilizes high-frequency vibrations to perform the best clean possible.

Detecting serious health issues as early as possible means a better survival and cure rate. Diseases such as oral cancer are more easily cured in early stages. We are thrilled to offer our patients access to a VELscope exam, which is a quick and easy examination designed to effectively identify any abnormal tissues in the oral cavity. By using this efficient technology, we can detect issues much sooner for better outcomes.

Many of the restorative care improvements that have been developed in recent years means better value and time savings for our patients. This is why we love the CEREC technology that was developed in the late 1980’s and has been gaining in popularity in recent years. CEREC stands for Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics.

The CEREC process allows dentists to design, construct and insert individual ceramic restorations for a tooth that has decayed, is weakened, or is broken. It can also be used to remove and replace old or defective fillings. CEREC is extremely precise and durable, making them the most reliable restorative process currently available in the dental market. They are natural-looking and long lasting. The best part? This restoration process can take place in one visit.

hagen dental in cincinnati

Call Hagen Dental Practice Today

Ready to experience some of the great technological advances available to you at Hagen Dental? Call us today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule your complimentary consultation.

Sources

  1. http://www.ada.org/en/about-the-ada/ada-history-and-presidents-of-the-ada/ada-history-of-dentistry-timeline

What to Know About Oral Cancer, Eating Disorders & Decalcification

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

eating disorders and oral health

More than 10 million Americans are affected by serious eating disorders. These disorders can have serious ramifications for your overall health, as well as your oral health!2

A Serious Subject: Eating Disorders & Your Health

Two of the most common eating disorders are bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa. Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by repeated, excessive eating, followed by self-induced vomiting, also known as purging. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by an extreme fear of gaining weight, a desire to be thin, self-induced starvation, and the inability to maintain a normal weight.

Both conditions deprive the body of crucial vitamins, minerals, proteins and other nutrients required to maintain good health, including oral health. These deficiencies can lead to decalcification of the teeth.3

Decalcification is an early form of tooth decay and damage that can lead to further injuries or breakdown of teeth, more serious tooth decay, and cavities.

Eating disorders can also cause bad breath, tenderness of the mouth and throat, as well as swelling in the salivary glands. These disorders can lead to dry mouth, cracked lips, sores in the mouth, bleeding gums, and sensitivity of the teeth.1,2

The self-induced vomiting that occurs with bulimia nervosa causes powerful digestive acids from the stomach (that normally aren’t found in the mouth) to come in contact with the teeth. This acid attacks and wears away at the tooth enamel, causing erosion. This frequent purging can also change the color, shape, or even length of the teeth!1

Those with anorexia nervosa can experience osteoporosis and severe malnutrition, leading to weakening of the bones. This includes weakening of the jaw bone as well as weakening of the teeth and enamel, or even tooth breakage or loss.1

Long-Term Negative Health Effects

Long term malnutrition from eating disorders can lead to increased susceptibility to infections and other negative health effects.

The repeated vomiting of bulimia can damage the lining of the esophagus because of the repeated contact with the strong stomach acid and the micro-traumas of the tissue associated with the purging. A very small percentage of bulimics can develop bulimia-related cancer due to the damage to the esophagus.4

What to Know About Oral Cancer

Concerned about oral cancer? Early warning signs include lumps or growths in the mouth, throat or neck, patchy areas or lesions in the tissues of the mouth, hoarseness or difficulty swallowing, unusual bleeding, or persistent sores that don’t heal. Recall that when you come in for your regular visit, we look for signs of cancer—after all, we’re trained to do so.

Prevention and regular dental checkups are key when it comes to proper oral health as well as preventing oral cancer! Additionally, a healthy, nourishing diet is important to give your mouth and teeth the building blocks it needs to stay healthy.

prevention at hagen dds practice in cincinnati

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

If you or someone you know suffers from an eating disorder, it is important that you seek professional help as soon as possible. Overcoming the eating disorder is the first step to healing the effects of the acid and nutrient deficiencies that come along with these conditions.

We can help you restore and work with some of the problems created from eating disorders (and that’s part of why we want to know about your health history, too.) Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at (513) 251-5500.

References/Sources:

  1. http://www.yourdentistryguide.com/eating-disorder/
  2. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/Teens/concerns
  3. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/decalcification
  4. http://www.bulimiahelp.org/articles/bulimia-and-cancer-what-you-need-know
  5. http://www.atooth.com/oral-cancer/

 

Minerals and Vitamins for a Healthy Smile

Saturday, August 20th, 2016

the health of your teeth hagen dental

Good oral hygiene practices are essential for a healthy smile. But have you ever wondered if your diet supports the best building blocks to keep those teeth strong? Mineral deficiencies can lead to weak bones and teeth. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin D are all important minerals and vitamins when it comes to preventing tooth decay and oral health issues. Check out these lists of foods that support you in your quest for strong, healthy teeth.

Calcium — Your teeth and jaw are formed and kept strong with the use of lots of calcium. Regular intake of this mineral helps keep your teeth enamel and jaw bones strong and healthy. Most of the body’s calcium is stored in the bones (teeth included!), while some circulates in the bloodstream for other uses. Consuming too little calcium can put you at risk of gum disease and tooth decay, and you will leech calcium from the bone to use for other body functions.

Sources of Calcium: Kale, tofu, chia seeds, sardines, canned salmon, green leafy vegetables such as collard greens, spinach and kale, dairy products, cauliflower, cabbage, almonds, bok choy, figs, and sesame seeds.1, 6

Phosphorus — Calcium and phosphorus work together to maximize the strength of bones and teeth. Without phosphorus, calcium can’t do it’s job properly. The combination of these two minerals is essential in children, whose bones and teeth are developing and forming their hard structure.

Sources of phosphorus: Pumpkin seeds, romano cheese, salmon, shellfish, almonds and other nuts, pork, beef, tofu, eggs, grapes, citrus fruit, cucumbers, tomatoes, beans and lentils.4, 8

your teeth health hagen dental cincinnatiMagnesium — Magnesium helps to build strong enamel for your teeth, as well as proper tooth formation. It also helps prevent the formation of cavities. Magnesium also works well alongside calcium for many functions.

Sources of Magnesium: Dark chocolate, green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and swiss chard, black beans, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, brown rice, cashews, salmon, raisins and avocado.2, 3, 7

Vitamin D — Vitamin D regulates the body’s balance of calcium and phosphorus and can promote their absorption. Vitamin D also helps to decrease inflammation of gums which is associated with periodontal disease.

Sources of Vitamin D: Natural sunlight (your body produces vitamin D with exposure to sun! This is your BEST source of D), shellfish, fish such as salmon, catfish and mackerel, eggs and butter.4, 5

These lists aren’t the only places to find these great bone builders, but they are a great place to start. See something new? Be adventurous this week and try a new recipe. Try to incorporate some of these foods in your regular diet alongside your other dental care routine. You’ll enjoy them knowing you are helping build and maintain a healthy smile.hagen dental cincinnati ohio

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at(513) 251-5500.

Sources/References used directly in this article:

1.http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/6-vitamins-and-minerals-your-mouth-needs/

2. http://www.123dentist.com/important-minerals-and-vitamins-for-your-oral-health

3.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/17/magnesium-benefits.aspx

4. https://www.dhsv.org.au/dental-advice/teeth-tips-and-facts/calcium-vitamin-d-and-phosphorus

5.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/11/12/vitamin-d1.aspx

6. http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/blog/whole-story/non-dairy-sources-calcium

7. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/

8. https://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/high-phosphorus-foods.php

How to Choose Your Dentist

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

cincinnati dentist familyTime to choose a new dentist? Maybe you moved or maybe you haven’t been to the dentist in recent years. Whatever the case may be, what are the top things you should know as you look for a new dentist?

Your Dental Needs: How to Get the Highest Level of Care

When it comes to choosing your dentist, one of the biggest things you don’t want to do is choose your dentist based solely on your insurance plan since, after all, dental insurance is very limited and is not focused on quality of your care.

Some of the factors that many patients look for include:

  • Personalized, approachable and friendly team
  • Transparency around treatment options, and openness, or the ability, to ask questions about care or recommended care
  • Comfortable environment in the office at all times during your visit
  • Respect of your time
  • Modern technology & superior service offerings
  • Strong expertise and experience
  • Family-oriented

These are what are patients are usually looking for, which helps them find a match at Hagen Dental.

You want a dentist focused on your overall health and well-being, as well as your specific oral health needs. Here are 3 other factors to consider when looking for a dentist.

Ask questions!

Don’t be afraid to ask questions about a dentist’s approach, the technology/services they offer, and/or about the dental team. Keep in mind that most dentists would love to tell you about their ongoing education and about their approach to your health. If desired, ask about the available services and technology, and take a look at their website if appropriate.

Talk to family and friends.

Don’t be afraid to also pick up the phone and ask friends and family about their dentist. We are proud that our patients refer us to many of their family members and friends.

Being referred by a friend, colleague or family member is a great way to know the dentist you will be going to is friendly, that the office environment is comfortable, and that they will care about your health.

Evaluate after your visit.

There are many questions you can ask after your first visit. Was the office clean and orderly? Did the approach of the dentist align with what you were looking for? Was the team and office welcoming? Did you feel you could trust your dentist and ask him questions?

If you came to Hagen Dental for your first visit, you would be able to hear how Dr. Hagen received his dental degree from The Ohio State University School of Dentistry. He is also president of the Greater Cincinnati Dental Study Club and a member of the American Dental Association, Ohio Dental Association, and Cincinnati Dental Society.

Dr. Hagen has undergone extensive postgraduate education over the years, including training in whole mouth rehabilitation, CEREC™ one-visit restorations, and crown and bridge restorations, allowing him to provide you with the state-of-the-art options (see more of them here) for obtaining the smile of your dreams. His training in sleep dentistry also allows him to offer alternative treatments for sleep apnea for better overall health.

While the first visit if of course focused on the patietn, you also might hear how Dr. Hagen’s commitment to lifelong education means he is constantly evaluating emerging dental methods and technologies, so that patients can have the latest and greatest available.

Dr. Hagen is focused on your total health, so he wants to see you with the best results, in the least invasive manner, all with a high emphasis on comfort.

Wherever you go, after that first visit, be sure to evaluate and make sure you are satisfied with your dentist and the dental team. You deserve the highest quality of care, an easy-to-talk to dentist, a friendly team, and state-of-the-art technology.

We Look Forward to Meeting You and Your Entire Family

At Hagen Dental, we know that many patients have different levels of apprehension about visiting the dentist, and the most important thing we can do first is to listen to our patients. We want to know about your unique needs and how we can help you have confidence and be happy with your (oral) health.

Whether you or your loved ones are concerned about pain, have had past dental experience that has been traumatic, or are simply ashamed of your own perceived dental shortcomings, we will treat you with compassion and understanding. Give us a call today (513) 251-5500 or see more on our website at hagendds.com

Ready for a Pain-Free Smile Makeover? All About Snap-On Smile™ at Hagen Dental

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

Implants. Veneers. Zoom! Teeth Whitening. Crowns. CEREC technology We have the latest and greatest when it comes to cosmetic dentistry so that you can improve your smile, have a natural look, and of course so that you can have confidence when you smile, meet new people, or just when you go to eat.

A new approach that’s earned a lot of buzz lately is Snap-On Smile™. Part of the reason it’s getting so much attention is that Snap-On Smile™ is an ideal combination of comfort and function. Not only is it a non-invasive alternative for a brand new smile, but it can easily (and with no pain) give you that smile you’ve been missing!

What is Snap-On Smile?

Simply put, Snap-On Smile™ is a removable, cosmetic dental appliance that has been custom-made for your smile. Snap-On Smile™ is a strong, thin material (hi-tech dental resin) that can still give you a beautiful smile. This approach requires no adhesives or glue of any kind. We are talking no tooth removal, bonding, drilling or shots!

So how does it work? Just like the name suggests, Snap-On Smile™ works easily and with no pain: all you have to do is put your new smile over your current teeth by “snapping” them into place. This approach was built to fit comfortably over your existing teeth, while still looking natural, which is what most people desire in a new solution for their teeth.

This means even if you have discoloration, any stains, gaps or missing teeth, you can take advantage of Snap-On Smile™.

Snap on Smile at Hagen Dental Cincinnati Ohio

Who Else Benefits from Snap-On Smile?

Snap-On Smile™ is extremely easy to use—all you have to do is “snap” it on. We make sure it fits perfectly to your teeth so that you can be comfortable, and can easily remove your fitting when desired. For that reason, many people look to Snap-On Smile for a solution to a better smile.

Some people who choose Snap-On Smile™ currently have:

  • The desire for a new smile, but reluctant for any drilling or procedures
  • Missing teeth (some that show when they smile, others that do not)
  • Gaps or crooked teeth
  • Teeth “heights” that vary
  • Stains or discoloration

Do you already know you are not a candidate for bridges or implants? Ask us about Snap-On Smile™ because this may be the solution for you!

We also see people with older, removable/partial dentures coming to us for a solution that can be functional and more aesthetically pleasing. Come on in and we can see if this is finally the solution that can give you back full confidence in your smile.

You Can Get A Beautiful Smile with Snap-On Smile™

Interested in a pain-free way to close the gap between your teeth? Or maybe you are looking to cover your existing crooked teeth! It’s time for smile enhancement, with no drilling or extractions necessary. Even if you have sensitive teeth, this is a solution that can work for you.

What Else Should I Know About Snap-On Smile™?

When you come in for your visit with us, let us know you are interested in learning more. From there, once we know you are a candidate, we can pick the style and shade of your new smile. We will make a pain-free impression of your teeth, and your next visit with Hagen, you will have your new smile fitting.

At the fitting, we simply make sure that your new smile fits just as it should—then you get to walk out with your brand new smile! Your smile makeover can be just that easy and quick, and your fitting can last as long as 5 years.

One more benefit of Snap-On Smile™ is that you can eat and drink when you have your Snap-On Smile™; this is part of what makes it so popular. Last, maintenance and care of your new set of teeth was designed to be minimal. We will provide you with cleaning solution, and just exactly how your simple, at-home care of your new smile, will work.

Have questions about this affordable alternative? Set up your appointment with us today to learn more.

Top Questions: Your Child’s Oral Health

Friday, September 19th, 2014

childrens dentist cincinnati ohio hagen

This week we answer 4 questions about children’s oral health.

1. Can my children have the kind of tooth sensitivity I have?

When adults have tooth sensitivity, the medical term for it is “dentin hypersensitivity.” If you’ve been reading our blog, you’d know that it’s a result of gum recession or exposed roots. (This kind of teeth sensitivity is often caused by improper brushing habits, gum disease or early stages of gum disease, and it can be made worse by what we eat or drink.)

To answer the question, however, it’s pretty unlikely your kids will experience this kind of uncomfortable feeling when they go to eat their favorite foods, or hot/cold drinks.

If they do mention having some kind of tooth or gum sensitivity, it might be from a cavity, which is of course a major source of sensitivity or pain!

What else might be causing some kind of sensitivity?

If a tooth breaks or cracks, our kids can also have some discomfort.

Look to make sure your children are not biting on ice, using their teeth as tools (biting things open, etc.), and make sure they wear a mouth guard when they play sports.  If they show resistance to wearing a mouth guard, remind them of how common it is for professional athletes to now wear mouth guards! It can save their teeth (not to mention prevent damage to their jaw), so it’s definitely worth getting into the habit of wearing.

These are ways to prevent some of the most common ways we can crack or break our teeth, but even with these precautions, our children may experience discomfort in their mouth, or they may unfortunately experience injury to their mouth in general. Be sure to bring them in to us to discuss all their options if either is the case.

2. I know the value of going to the dentist, but why do we need to bring our young children in for regular visits?

Of course you want your children to have confidence when it comes to their entire health…and that includes confidence when it comes to smiling—both now and in the coming years. Our kids learn a lot of positive dental habits at a young age, and the idea of going to the dentist fits into this category as well.

But also recall that the most common childhood disease is actually cavities or tooth decay. Going to the dentist is one of the key ways we can look to prevent this with our children.

Find that difficult to believe?

Tooth decay actually affects one in four kids in the US that are between the age of 2 and 5. When you look at children a bit older, between 12 and 15, that ratio jumps to one in two, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since this kind of tooth decay can typically be prevented with habits and dietary choices, it goes to show how starting early is important.

It’s also possible that if baby teeth do decay, and as a result fall out sooner than they would have normally, the adult teeth don’t have as much room as they should when they come in!

That’s just one more reason to come visit the dentist, right alongside your other childhood doctor visits.

3. My child appears to be grinding their teeth. What should I do?

Come in and see us! Without giving specific recommendations, in general, we want to treat a child who is grinding their teeth differently in order to protect their teeth over time.

This may require wearing a custom appliance or mouth guard at night, but we’d also want to better determine what could be the cause of the teeth grinding. It’s good that these types of behaviors are being identified, but it’s also a situation where you should come in to the office to speak with Dr. Hagen to see the right solution for your child.

4. Speaking of which, as a parent, what should I be telling Dr. Hagen when it comes to my child’s oral health, or overall state of health, when we come in for a visit?

That’s a great question. We are all about two-way, transparent communication at Hagen Dental. Be sure to tell us any concerns you have, and that includes any questions you or your children may have.

You will hear us ask about medications that your children may be taking. See this blog for why that’s so important when it comes to their dental care.

Besides letting us know any concerns or questions you have, also tell us any other health conditions we should know about. It’s not that we are nosey, rather, this is about your child’s entire health, and the mouth can really give us insight about your child’s current state of health—that is, when we are informed!

The kind of information you’d want to tell us includes any medical conditions (including history), any kind of pain or abnormal mouth/gum issues a child has had, and things such as allergies, asthma, diabetes, or other health-related conditions you would discuss with your other doctors.

It might not seem to be related to dental care, but more often than not, it is. Have any questions about your children’s teeth or gums? Schedule a visit with us today

What Teeth Whitener Can—and Cannot—Do

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

Just like with other technology, we’ve had the latest and greatest when it comes to teeth whitening in our office.

Even if we have good oral hygiene, teeth do get darker as we age. And yes, it is true that even if you have oral health habits that would make the dentist smile, that doesn’t mean you don’t eat or drinks beverages that can stain teeth over time as well!

Teeth stains are different than “normal” discoloration as we age, but both can contribute to a less-than-perfectly-white smile.

Our Pearly Whites…Or Not Quite So Pearly White!

Discoloration can be broke down into intrinsic and extrinsic color. Think of intrinsic as our teeth’s natural shade. People born with a hint of grey, or brown or yellow teeth would likely be more aware of this, as their teeth have this as their natural shade. This would refer to a color or shade of that is not due to their habits over time.

And as you can likely guess, when we drink coffee or wine, or have a certain medicine that alters our teeth, the extrinsic part of our teeth is what is being affected. What also affects our teeth’s shade includes other behaviors we can control such as smoking, which is one habit that can greatly reduce any efforts at keeping our teeth white.

teeth whiten cincinnati

When we purchase an OTC whitener from a drugstore, there are quite a variety of brands to choose from based on your desired goals, as well as your tooth sensitivity.

They also come with varying levels of success in terms of whitening efficacy because the bleach in them will vary, and the trays or ways in which they are applied will also effect their ability to work on any given person’s teeth. They do, however, provide more whitening benefit than your whitening toothpaste since they will have more bleach in them in comparison.

No matter if you use OTC whiteners, or Zoom! Whitening at our office, if you do not take good care of your teeth, it will be hard to keep your teeth white…and it can even be hard to get them whiter through the use of bleach in general.

Knowing this, the difference between the OTC brands and Zoom! is the level of intensity, effectiveness, and safety.

With Zoom!, we apply hydrogen-peroxide formula to your teeth. Then, we cover your surrounding gum so that you can avoid teeth sensitivity, or so-called “Zingers”.

If you use a kit at home, this process can be harder to setup so that you can whiten without any sensitivity. If you have a cavity or gum that is pulling back from the teeth, you could be exposing harsh bleach to those areas…you can see why that might hurt! Next, Zoom! Whitening uses a ultraviolet light that we directly shine onto your teeth. This way, within an hour you can fight the discoloration and be on your way. With many OTC options, that whitening process could take several weeks, or up to several months.

Since it happens much quicker, is the Zoom! Whitening option safe?

Zoom! Whitening at Hagen is in fact safe. It it were not in your best interest, we would let you know. On the other hand, if you want to use an OTC agent, ask us before proceeding so we can talk to you about your options, including the effectiveness and the safety of your kit from the store. Our real concern would be to avoid over-use, general misuse, or doing some damage to your teeth or gums. We don’t want to see you in excruciating pain.

“I’m not ready for any teeth whitening, but what can I do to prevent as much stains as possible?”

Pigmented molecules in food and beverages are actually watch latch onto our enamel. You probably know some of these offenders that are chromogen-rich in particular:

  • Black coffee
  • Dyed sweets
  • Red wine
  • Pop
  • Deeply-colored sauces (such as soy sauce)
  • Blueberries, cranberries, pomegranates or other dark berries

Certain gums and hard candies, in some situations, also fit into this category. If desired, you can avoid these foods and beverages. Also remember that smoking is very detrimental to any teeth whitening efforts.

Also on the list are foods with tannins, or with high acidity. These are things such as tea, pop or carbonated beverages with dye, sports drinks and acidic fruit. Some of these are not so brightly colored, but they still can work against our pearly whites.

Want to know more about our cosmetic dentistry procedures? Find out more here and let us know any questions you may have.

Why Does Good Oral Hygiene Matter? Looking Beyond Our Mouth

Monday, August 25th, 2014

More than 90 percent of systemic diseases have oral symptoms, according to the Academy of General Dentistry. Additionally, as much as 80 percent of adults in the US have gum disease.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the research as to why this might matter for the sake of our entire health.

A Look at the Science: Heart Health to Obesity 

We’ve talked about before how gum disease can lead to loss of bone and teeth, and how bacteria that cause gum disease have also been found in arterial plaques, which contributes to heart disease.

cincinnati dentist hagenWhat else does some of the latest research tell us?

Self-reported dental status has been shown to be connected with heart risk factors. One such study examining this connection was found in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The study looked are more than 15,000 people across nearly 40 countries to draw its conclusions.

Here is a glimpse of the study: 25 percent of the participants reported gum bleeding when they brushed their teeth. Around 41 percent had fewer than 15 teeth left. All the participants in the study had coronary heart disease in combination with at least another heart risk factor.

Ultimately, the research showed an association between the number of heart risk factors and gum disease across the sample.

While it has been debated whether periodontal disease is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (which takes 600,000 lives per year), this study was one where you can see evidence of how self-reported gum disease and such cardiovascular risk factors are associated.

More Clues About Our Health

Besides moderate or more advanced stages of periodontal disease showing us clues as to whether someone may develop heart disease, oral health also affects our state of health in other ways. It can negatively affect pregnancy and birth; one example being that gum disease is linked to premature birth and low birth weight in babies. Osteoporosis has been linked, in some studies, with periodontal bone loss. Additionally, tooth loss before age 35 may be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s.

And although the cause-and-effect tie can be debated, there is also research connecting obesity and gum disease now. In particular, the research published in the Journal General Dentistry says how chronic inflammation is in part to blame.

Still other research shows a tie between poor dental habits and an increase in our risk of cancer.

There is also HPV; research in the Journal Cancer Prevention says that poor oral health means a 56 percent bump in oral HPV prevalence.  

Additionally, University of Texas Health Sciences Center researchers found dental problems are linked with a 28 percent higher prevalence of infection with HPV.

Another study was compiled by researchers from Brown University, the Forsyth Institute and Harvard University. These researchers said how they found that our body’s antibodies coming from certain oral bacteria is actually linked with doubled risk of pancreatic cancer. The researchers admitted that more needed to be studied to make any further claims, but it does show just one more example of how our oral health is tied to our entire health.  

This list of some of the latest research is not to make you worry. It may surprise you to learn that research has also produced evidence that shows how just getting your teeth professionally cleaned once can reduce risk for heart attach and stroke. (Think of a lifetime of regular professional teeth cleanings!)

The health of our mouths truly can really tell us about our quality of life.

At Hagen, we are the best choice for all your dental care. Whether you haven’t missed a cleaning in your lifetime, or whether it has been years since you have been to the dentist, we are looking forward to seeing you. Give us a call today.

Oral Cancer: Frequently Asked Questions

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

How does oral cancer start?

Oral, or mouth cancer, can refer to any kind of cancerous tissue growth in our oral cavities, can come from neighboring anatomy (such as the nose), or it can simply originate in the mouth. As you may or may not know, cancer can be best understood as a result of a mutation of our DNA.

When our cells operate in these abnormal ways, we can see them as red or white patches on our soft tissue, or as spots in our mouth that simply won’t heal. Most oral cancers are cancer of the epithelial cells. We see this classification of cancer in the tissue in our mouths and/or lips in most cases. 

Woral cancer cincinnati ohio what you need to knowhat are some of the common warning signs of oral cancer?

This is exactly why you come in to see us on a regular basis—we are checking for the early signs of oral cancer through screening each time we see you. If we were to see unusual lumps or ulceration that are not healing, we would want to know more. These skin lesions can be on the tongue, lip, or around the mouth. They can be white, red, or best describes as “pale” in color.

In other cases, signs or symptoms are mouth sores, or even pain in more advanced cases. And still in other situations, people have issues with tongue movement. Many of us have had some sort of unusual feeling, or possibly a sore in our mouth at one time or another, so the best course of action is to come in and see us if you are concerned.

The key is early detection, which in the case of oral cancer, greatly improves one’s survival rate.

What causes oral cancer?

Approximately two thirds of oral cancers are actually due to our behaviors. You may have already heard how in particular, heavy alcohol use and tobacco are two behaviors we know contribute to a rise in likelihood for oral cancer. Part of the reason why tobacco is so harmful for us is that tobacco has more than 60 known carcinogens.

Also keep in mind that chewing tobacco is putting this exposure directly onto our tissue. Chewing tobacco/snuff also (intentionally) is designed to irritate our mucous membranes (for quicker absorption), which is even worse for our oral health.

With that said, be aware that the majority of new cases of oral cancer are HPV-related.

That also means more young people are getting oral cancer today, a fact that surprises many.

Poor oral hygiene habits, as well as cases of chronic infection, have also been found to result in increasing one’s chance of oral cancer. Other risk factors include ultraviolet light (from sunlight or tanning beds) and infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). In some cases, these symptoms are

Seeing a dentist regularly, maintaining good oral hygiene habits over time, and avoiding tobacco are all very beneficial for us in terms of taking control of our lifestyle habits.

4 Foods Good for Your Entire Health—Including Your Teeth

Monday, August 11th, 2014

When we talk about what you can eat to keep your teeth for a lifetime, a more accurate description might be it’s what we don’t eat that can save our teeth!

What will also determine our level of oral hygiene, and whether or not we “keep our teeth,” is our routine behavior after we eat or drink. Take for example foods with a high sugar and/or starch make-up, such as a hard candy, a cookie, a piece of cake or even a slice of bread. (You could even put dried fruits or a banana on that list!, in some cases) When sugar or starches are left on our teeth, bacteria thrive. The acid that results will destroy our tooth enamel, and we are left with tooth decay.

It actually only takes 20 minutes for that acid to start damaging our teeth. Knowing this, we set out to find foods that are beneficial for our teeth.

Here are 4 foods that can help us improve our entire health, including our teeth.

Total health Hagen

1.Kale, spinach, collard greens, cabbage, romaine, and turnip greens.

Number one on the list is what can certainly be classified as the leafy greens category! These greens are one of the top ways we can eat to fuel our bodies and to protect our teeth. They have fiber, minerals, and are packed with vitamins.

Take Popeye’s favorite leafy green, spinach, for example: it is low calorie, but has vitamin A and C. If we don’t have enough Vitamin C In our diet, it’s possible that we can further promote gum issues such as bleeding gums. Look at it this way: Vitamin C can at least help us further support our bones, teeth and cartilage. If you haven’t been including them in your diet, look to include them in existing recipes you are eating, such as casseroles, in your next tortilla wrap or sandwich, or on top of your turkey burger as a bun.

2. Broccoli.

Noticing a trend with green vegetables being good for your total health?

Another low calorie food with 25 calories per serving, broccoli is great for our entire health because it is packed with Vitamin C, and once again, has fiber which can aid in our digestion process. It also has potassium, folate and Vitamin A.

Other benefits of broccoli is that it can support our eye health. If you don’t like to eat this superstar vegetable raw, look up some new recipes with cooked broccoli and get creative. If you want, try out other veggies in broccoli’s family: cauliflower, cabbage, or brussel sprouts. You won’t be disappointed.

3. A handful of your favorite nuts and seeds.

Again, looking at the nutrient profile of most nuts, we find iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, Vitamin E, and more. We’re talking about a phenomenal source of plant-based protein, which can also be beneficial to some with specialty diets. Not to be forgotten in many nuts and seeds is calcium, which is of course important for strong bones and teeth…

Another benefit of nuts and seeds is they can be a great on-the-go, convenient snack. Just don’t crack the nuts with your teeth!

4. Onions.

That’s right, onions! We wanted to give you a food you may have not have seen coming on the list.

Onions actually have compounds that can benefit our health, specifically, recent research has even given us evidence that onions help combat bacteria known to cause gum disease and cavities…

If that isn’t enough to convince you, they also have a high polyphenol content, which is a category of phytonutrient that can help us prevent disease. In fact, the polyphenol content in an onion is greater than that in garlic, leeks, (which onions are closely related to), and even bell peppers, for comparison. If that isn’t convincing you to add more to your diet, they also have been shown to risk of certain cancers, lower risk of cataract formation, reduce certain symptoms associated with diabetes, help our gut flora, and they reduce symptoms associated with osteoporosis.

While some people don’t like raw onions, you can always cook them. Once again, try to get creative by adding them in to recipes you are already eating.

There are yellow, red and white onion varieties, and don’t forget grilled or sautéed onions are a great way to add more flavor to almost any dish.

What else can we look to include in our diet? Good old water!

Water helps aid digestion, it keeps our skin moisturized, it boosts our immune system naturally, and it can also serve to increase our energy and relieve fatigue in general.

Take note of how much you are really drinking each day.

When we get enough water each day, it also “rinses out” our mouth after consuming sweets or anything that is starch-heavy. In this way, it naturally cleanses our mouths and helps combat decay.

Another benefit, besides avoiding “empty” calories for those looking to do so, is that by substituting water in for other beverages, we usually also help keep the acid exposure we are getting in check.