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The Future of Dentistry is Here!

Monday, March 27th, 2017

“Dentistry” as we know it has come a long way since its ancient origins. Over hundreds of years, oral care, dental knowledge, hygiene practices, cleaning and surgical procedures have developed into the modern day dental advances we know, enjoy and appreciate today.

As you know, Hagen Dental Practice is proud to offer the latest and greatest when it comes to today’s dental innovations!

dentistry innovations

A Long History Full of Improvements

Not surprisingly, the 20th century boasts some of the most meaningful innovations and advancements throughout this long history of dental practice. To start, the 20th century saw the standardization of operative procedures and instrumentation, as well as the improvement of dental training and text books.

Dental practices also started becoming more comfortable during this time. In 1905, a German chemist formulated the local anesthetic now known as Novocain that helps numb feeling in the tissues being worked on. Fifty years later, in 1958, a fully reclining dental chair was introduced to the profession, allowing patients to sit more comfortably during dental appointments.

We know how important it is to have a comfortable and relaxing environment when you come in to see us!

Along with better education for Dentists, the training of dental hygienists was also initiated and improved. Their practice of cleaning teeth was shown to greatly reduce the incidence of cavities among the children being worked on, which launched the dental hygienist movement to complement existing dental practices.

As the century continued, toothpaste and toothbrush quality saw improvements and changes. Nylon was introduced as material for toothbrush bristles, and fluoride was added to paste. New filling materials and bonding resins improved the outcomes of dental work. Lasers were approved for soft tissue work, and the first commercial electric toothbrush went to market.

Moving into Cosmetic Dentistry

In the late 1980’s, home tooth bleaching became a possibility with new commercial products offered on the market. During the 1990’s, dental care expanded to allow for cosmetic accommodations for patients, not just practical or essential dental work. Other innovations included new tooth-colored restorative materials, implants and veneers became available.

tech continues to advance in dentistry

Technology Continues To Enhance The Care We Provide You

In the 21st century, dental advancements and technology developments have not slowed down. We continue to see improvements for patient care, cleaning procedures, restorative processes and preventative care.

Several of these advancements have arisen in the way we perform imaging and cavity detection. At Hagen Dental, we are proud to utilize digital x-ray technology which offers a decreased amount of radiation to our patients, the removal of strong developing chemicals from our office, and faster, more reliable access to the images of your mouth.

We also use a Laser Scanner, which can detect smaller cavities up to years earlier than traditional x-ray and visual examination. This means finding the cause of sensitivity and pain earlier, and allowing more of your natural tooth to remain intact and in your mouth with earlier treatment.

The Best Clean Possible

New cleaning technological advances that are now available mean a better removal of plaque and calculus from your teeth. At Hagen Dental, we offer the best cleaning possible with the use of the Piezo Scaler to more quickly and effectively clean your teeth and gums thoroughly. This tool utilizes high-frequency vibrations to perform the best clean possible.

Detecting serious health issues as early as possible means a better survival and cure rate. Diseases such as oral cancer are more easily cured in early stages. We are thrilled to offer our patients access to a VELscope exam, which is a quick and easy examination designed to effectively identify any abnormal tissues in the oral cavity. By using this efficient technology, we can detect issues much sooner for better outcomes.

Many of the restorative care improvements that have been developed in recent years means better value and time savings for our patients. This is why we love the CEREC technology that was developed in the late 1980’s and has been gaining in popularity in recent years. CEREC stands for Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics.

The CEREC process allows dentists to design, construct and insert individual ceramic restorations for a tooth that has decayed, is weakened, or is broken. It can also be used to remove and replace old or defective fillings. CEREC is extremely precise and durable, making them the most reliable restorative process currently available in the dental market. They are natural-looking and long lasting. The best part? This restoration process can take place in one visit.

hagen dental in cincinnati

Call Hagen Dental Practice Today

Ready to experience some of the great technological advances available to you at Hagen Dental? Call us today at (513) 251-5500 to schedule your complimentary consultation.

Sources

  1. http://www.ada.org/en/about-the-ada/ada-history-and-presidents-of-the-ada/ada-history-of-dentistry-timeline

How to Make the Most of Your Invisalign Experience

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

Invisalign straightens the teeth using a series of clear, removable aligners. These aligners are custom-made for each patient. Every two weeks, you replace your aligner with a new set to gradually and gently move your teeth towards the final position.

The concept is the same as braces and other orthodontia, with some big differences: Invisalign is more comfortable, less noticeable, and it is removable. A 3-D computer imaging program creates a complete treatment plan that starts at your teeth’s current position and takes you all the way through to the desired outcome in two-week increments (1).

With Invisalign, you can make changes to your teeth and achieve the smile you’ve dreamed of without disruptions to your life.

benefits-of-invisalign

The Many Benefits of Invisalign

 Here are just a few of the benefits you can experience:

  •  Most cases are fairly quick. It typically takes between 9 and 15 months for the Invisalign aligners to correct and straighten a smile.
  • Invisalign aligners can correct issues such as gapped teeth, overbite, crossbite, underbite, and overcrowding
  • Since the aligners are nearly invisible, you can feel more confident smiling and showing your teeth than with the use of traditional braces.
  • The Invisalign is comfortable! Without the metal braces, wires and headgear associated with traditional braces, you avoid irritation to the gums and surrounding tissues.
  • There are fewer trips into the Dentist for evaluation. Your progress is checked every one to two months.
  • You don’t have to sacrifice the things you love! One of the best parts about Invisalign is that you can eat and drink whatever you like (see below for a few caveats). Since the aligners are removable for proper cleaning of your mouth, you do not have to limit your food selection. You wear your Invisalign for most of the day; but you remove them during cleaning, brushing and flossing.

enjoy-your-invisalign-experience

How to Ensure You Have a Great Invisalign Experience


Now that you know the benefits, here is how to make sure you get the most out of the experience:

1. Travel toothbrushes will come in handy! Carry a travel toothbrush and paste with you, and try to brush your teeth after every meal. Because the aligners are placed over your teeth, food particles can become trapped.

The best defense is to keep your teeth clean. Patients who practice excellent dental hygiene habits during their Invisalign treatment are less likely to develop cavities, bad breath, or other problems (2).

2. When your two-week aligner switch date arrives, consider making the change to the new aligner at night. This will help prevent tooth aches and discomfort that can happen if you switch them during the day. The good news is, the changes are so gradual that pain is rare. However, discomfort could occur, especially in your first few sets of aligners.

3. Take good care of your aligners! Avoid discoloration and bad breath by dropping them into a glass of water with a denture cleaning tablet every morning. This helps to keep them fresh, clean, and looking nice and clear.

Avoid cleaning them with toothpaste, since some toothpastes contain abrasive ingredients. Always carry your case with you! This decreases the chances of them getting lost or thrown away while you are out at a restaurant, or need to take them out for some reason.

4. Be cautious in regards to your beverage choices. Water is important to stay hydrated, avoid bad breath, and keep a comfortable mouth. Avoid drinking hot drinks like coffee and tea while you are wearing your Invisalign aligners. The hot temperature could warp or deform them.

Avoid sugary drinks, which increase your risk for tooth decay or unusual buildup or texture on your teeth. Avoid red wines, which can cause yellow staining them.

5. After it’s all over, wear your retainer. Keep in mind that you will still have to wear a retainer for a period of time after your Invisalign treatment is finished. After investing time and money into your newly straightened mouth, you don’t want to backslide from that progress.

Call Hagen Dental Today to Learn More About Invisalign

 Do you want to learn more about Invisalign? Or are you simply overdue for your next dental cleaning? A straighter smile is just a phone call away! Call for a no cost/no obligation consultation at (513) 251-5500 to determine if you’re a candidate for Invisalign.

Sources:

  1. http://hagendds.com/invisalign_dentist_cincinnati_oh.html
  2. http://www.lifehack.org/486860/5-hacks-everyone-with-invisalign-needs-to-know

Don’t Neglect Your Dental Health While Away at College

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

oral health tips while at college

Midterms are in full force, you are deep into your class load, the manager from your part time job is calling to see if you can pick up an extra shift, there are intramural sports to be played, and there’s plenty of partying to be done on the weekend. As a college student, you are busy, and you have all the freedom and independence you want to make your own health decisions. But now is not the time to let your dental health go by the wayside due to your tightly packed schedule.

A 2016 study of dental health practices in US college students found that 76% of students reported having at least one dental exam in the year prior to their survey. But the study also found that dental health care habits and regular dental visits declined annually following the students’ freshman years.

Students cited reasons such as having a healthy mouth and not feeling they needed dental care, not having the time to go to the dentist, and worries about the cost of their visit for the explanations as to why they were missing their regular checkups (1).

Unfortunately, putting your oral health on the backburner is not a good choice. When it comes to your mouth and teeth, prevention is always cheaper and easier than waiting until a problem arises. Regular checkups can allow us to find issues before you show signs of pain and more advanced dental disease.

College students are also at risk for oral health changes because of poor dietary choices, changes in routine, and putting off regular visits to the dentist. Even though there is a lot on your plate and even more on your mind, there is hope!

Try these tips to maintain good oral hygiene while you make your way through your college years!

Keep it real. Eat “real foods” rather than packaged and processed foods to help minimize unnecessary sugars. Snacks such as fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts or seeds are great choices (2).

Keep sugar to a minimum.  Avoid using sugar as a stress reliever. Increased sugar intake increases your risk for decay and cavities.

Watch your late night eating and hygiene habits. Avoid late night snacking, or falling asleep without brushing your teeth. This habit leaves sugars and acids in your mouth to wreak havoc on your enamel until morning. Leftover food particles also become a breeding ground for bacteria. Furthermore, this sets you up for a bad case of morning breath (3).

Remember to exercise! Also be sure to develop regular exercise and good sleep habits. These routines are important and helpful for managing stress levels and maintaining both dental health and overall health during your college years (2).

Look at your entire health. Minimize or avoid alcohol use and smoking. College students sometimes experiment with these two behaviors, both of which cause dry mouth, changes in the pH of the mouth, and an increased risk for tooth decay or gum disease (2). Alcohol abuse also makes it more likely that you will skip or forget your nighttime dental cleaning routine.

Start with water! Choose water over sodas, energy drinks, and other sugary drinks. The acids found in carbonated and sugary drinks are very hard on your enamel (2, 3).

Brush and floss daily. These are time-tested habits that keep your oral health up. Even when you get home late or your schedule feels too busy, be sure to floss and brush. We recommend brushing twice a day with a soft brush, and flossing once a day (4). This investment takes about 5 minutes, which means you only have to dedicate 0.3% of your day to reap the rewards of a healthy smile.

Remember your regular dentist visits! Either find a great dentist near your school, or schedule your dental checkups around visits back to your hometown – over the holidays or school breaks. Don’t leave your next appointment without scheduling your next one!

dental exams

Call Hagen Dental Today

Are you overdue for your next dental cleaning? Or perhaps you are enrolled in school in the Cincinnati area and need to find a great dental practice while you are away from home? Give Hagen Dental a call to answer your questions or to schedule your next appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1363&context=jhdrp
  2. http://www.deardoctor.com/articles/10-health-tips-for-college-students/
  3. http://compdentalhealth.com/blog/college-students-oral-health/
  4. http://dental.ufl.edu/patient-care/patient-information/oral-health-tips-for-all-life-stages/

Minerals and Vitamins for a Healthy Smile

Saturday, August 20th, 2016

the health of your teeth hagen dental

Good oral hygiene practices are essential for a healthy smile. But have you ever wondered if your diet supports the best building blocks to keep those teeth strong? Mineral deficiencies can lead to weak bones and teeth. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin D are all important minerals and vitamins when it comes to preventing tooth decay and oral health issues. Check out these lists of foods that support you in your quest for strong, healthy teeth.

Calcium — Your teeth and jaw are formed and kept strong with the use of lots of calcium. Regular intake of this mineral helps keep your teeth enamel and jaw bones strong and healthy. Most of the body’s calcium is stored in the bones (teeth included!), while some circulates in the bloodstream for other uses. Consuming too little calcium can put you at risk of gum disease and tooth decay, and you will leech calcium from the bone to use for other body functions.

Sources of Calcium: Kale, tofu, chia seeds, sardines, canned salmon, green leafy vegetables such as collard greens, spinach and kale, dairy products, cauliflower, cabbage, almonds, bok choy, figs, and sesame seeds.1, 6

Phosphorus — Calcium and phosphorus work together to maximize the strength of bones and teeth. Without phosphorus, calcium can’t do it’s job properly. The combination of these two minerals is essential in children, whose bones and teeth are developing and forming their hard structure.

Sources of phosphorus: Pumpkin seeds, romano cheese, salmon, shellfish, almonds and other nuts, pork, beef, tofu, eggs, grapes, citrus fruit, cucumbers, tomatoes, beans and lentils.4, 8

your teeth health hagen dental cincinnatiMagnesium — Magnesium helps to build strong enamel for your teeth, as well as proper tooth formation. It also helps prevent the formation of cavities. Magnesium also works well alongside calcium for many functions.

Sources of Magnesium: Dark chocolate, green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and swiss chard, black beans, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, brown rice, cashews, salmon, raisins and avocado.2, 3, 7

Vitamin D — Vitamin D regulates the body’s balance of calcium and phosphorus and can promote their absorption. Vitamin D also helps to decrease inflammation of gums which is associated with periodontal disease.

Sources of Vitamin D: Natural sunlight (your body produces vitamin D with exposure to sun! This is your BEST source of D), shellfish, fish such as salmon, catfish and mackerel, eggs and butter.4, 5

These lists aren’t the only places to find these great bone builders, but they are a great place to start. See something new? Be adventurous this week and try a new recipe. Try to incorporate some of these foods in your regular diet alongside your other dental care routine. You’ll enjoy them knowing you are helping build and maintain a healthy smile.hagen dental cincinnati ohio

Set Up Your Next Dental Visit at Hagen Dental Practice

Have any questions you want to know the answer to? We’d love to answer any of the questions you have! Schedule your next visit with Hagen Dental by calling us at(513) 251-5500.

Sources/References used directly in this article:

1.http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/oral-health/6-vitamins-and-minerals-your-mouth-needs/

2. http://www.123dentist.com/important-minerals-and-vitamins-for-your-oral-health

3.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/17/magnesium-benefits.aspx

4. https://www.dhsv.org.au/dental-advice/teeth-tips-and-facts/calcium-vitamin-d-and-phosphorus

5.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/11/12/vitamin-d1.aspx

6. http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/blog/whole-story/non-dairy-sources-calcium

7. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/

8. https://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/high-phosphorus-foods.php

Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy: Part One

Sunday, February 7th, 2016

hagen dentalDid you know that February is National Children’s Dental Health Month?

The American Dental Association and the ADA Foundation support the month-long, national health observance as a time where people can become more educated on the benefits of good oral health in our children.

This year the ADA is focusing on awareness around sugar and the negative effects it can have on its teeth. The 2016 campaign shows kids ways they can “defeat” the effects of sugar and maintain good oral health habits through brushing, flossing, rinsing and eating healthy snacks that are low in sugar.

Why the focus on children this month?

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease that our kids have—and the increase in sugar in particular is one of the major reasons for this issue.

Consider how, generally speaking, nutritionists recommend that children do not consume any more than 16-17 grams of sugar per day through drinks or through their food. Just think of the negative effects some of the drinks they regularly consume is having on their teeth and their ability to obtain all their required nutrients for optimal growth.

Drinks we may have at our homes or drinks that are available at school are packed with sugar:

  • Coca-Cola: 40 grams of sugar
  • Pepsi: 40 grams of sugar
  • Mountain Dew: 44 grams of sugar
  • Welch’s 100% Grape Juice: 60 grams of sugar
  • Minute Maid Orange Juice: 40 grams of sugar
  • Capri Sun: About 44 grams of sugar

One of the best ways we can help them—for life—is to raise the level of education and awareness they have when it comes to oral health, and that includes knowledge around alternatives they can choose, in this case for beverages, that can support this lifestyle.

Does Your Child Have Their “Dental Home”?

no more dental fears at hagen dental in cincinnati ohioJust think: when your child is around three they should have their “dental home,” or a dentist that they can visit and know is “their dentist.” This helps children know the process of visiting the dentist! Having “their own dentist” to go to also reinforces how important it is to visit the dentist regularly and how it’s part of the process of taking care of our teeth and body. We pride ourselves in making sure that young children are extremely comfortable and enjoy their first (and following) visits to the dentist.

Once you’ve started regularly taking your child to the dentist, another benefit is that the dentist can also help you with your child’s specific fluoride needs. Many parents also enjoy how they can rely on the dentist to offer recommendations involving antibiotics and the impact of those antibiotics on our children’s teeth. For example, discoloration, as well as other issues, can occur from prolonged use of certain antibiotics that our children are taking.

Not only that, but certain children’s medications also have a large amount of sugar in them. Once you have your dentist that is familiar with your situation, those are the kinds of things that can be discussed for preventative care and for the sake of education as they grow.

Check back in next week for part two, which will include other tips on what we can do to make sure our kids keep their teeth healthy. Have questions about your child’s specific dental health? Or are you ready to bring your child in for their first visit to the dentist? Give us a call today at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here.

Sources

Getting Into the Valentine’s Day Spirit—The Healthy Way

Saturday, February 6th, 2016

dentist in cincinnati hagen dental ddsAs we get into the Valentine’s Day spirit, here are two main ways we can stay heart-healthy and happy this February.

Exercise for Your Heart

Whether you have a special someone in your life this Valentine’s Day or not, one thing is still true: cardio (or cardiovascular) exercise is important for the health of your heart because it increases your heart rate and increases your blood circulation.

Besides being good for your heart, cardio makes us feel better, strengthens our bones in many cases, reduce stress and anxiety, helps us sleep better, and research has shown it adds years to your life expectancy. (Source.)

When we maintain our cardiovascular fitness, we are “working” our heart, which makes sure that is stays strong.

As you likely know, there are quite a few different varieties of cardio exercise. Whether it’s cycling or running (which just might be our favorites) or another form such as an organized sport team you play on, get in cardio exercise so that you can work your heart muscle just like you would want to work any other muscle in your body!

Not only are you helping your heart stay in shape, but with regular cardio, you can help support your metabolism, help manage your weight, improve your ability to recover from workouts in general, and for those with diabetes, cardio actually can help you manage your condition.

Pro tip: use a heart rate monitor to really see how hard you training. Many of the heart monitors today are very affordable and some can even get data from your wrist.

dentist west side of cincinnati hagen dental dds

Eat for Your Heart

Eating for the health of our heart involves eating foods that support our nutritional needs, including vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. This also means eating in a way that doesn’t spur too much inflammation in the body.

While Valentine’s Day may mean a time to reach for some candy treats including sour candies and hard candies, just remember when we eat foods high in added sugar, over time, we can do damage to the body.

And yes, we also have to mention how the constant sugar on your teeth is harmful—and not to mention it sometimes can even result in a broken or chipped tooth!

But when it comes to our diet, more specifically, too much sugar can mean your body is not getting the nutrients it needs. That is because sugar contains calories that lack nutrient value, but at the same time they can still be quite high in calories. Additionally, when we eat lots of sugar regularly, it can result in insulin resistance (2). You can also think about it this way: while inflammation is a natural response in our body, if we have too much of it—which can happen when we eat too much sugar—it is thought to play a role in heart disease, certain cancers and in obesity.

Smile- and heart-friendly options that you can choose instead of all the hard, sour or gummy candies that can be popular around Valentine’s Day include:

  • Fun finger foods that can still be healthy such as stuffed mushrooms
  • “Tater tots” made from sweet potatoes
  • Fruit skewers: fruit that you put on kabobs—think blueberries, strawberries or another fruit if you are sticking to a color theme
  • Watermelon or another melon “cut out” using a heart cookie cutter. If you put these on kabobs, you can call them “Cupid Kabobs”
  • Mini smoothies made with no added sugar. You can even top it off with a red or heart-themed straw!

Healthy Choices: That’s Something We Love to Hear!

Whether you choose some of these more healthy and fun alternatives or not this Valentine’s Day, find what works for you by looking for lifestyle changes that you can sustain. Be sure to look to incorporate nutrient-dense foods that support your level of activity! It’s never a bad idea to educate yourself on just how much added sugar you’re consuming! This alone might be motivation so that you can cut back on sugar-added drinks that offer very little nutrients.

References/Sources

  1. http://www.livescience.com/36723-exercise-life-expectancy-overweight-obese.html
  1. http://whole9life.com/2010/06/sugar-sugar-sugar/

Our Founding Fathers: The State of Their Oral Health

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

found

Much of American legend says that George Washington had a set of wooden teeth. The story goes that he lost his first (adult) tooth when he was 22, but by the time he became President, he had just one tooth left! By that time, he was 57 years young.

So how did he actually lose his teeth over the years?

John Adams was said to have claimed it was Brazil nuts that he would crack his teeth on. Today, we know it’s never a good idea to use your teeth as “tools” or to chomp or crunch down on items (food or otherwise) that can traumatize the teeth.

Historians said he could have faced major decay because of mercury oxide as a result of being treated for smallpox and malaria. In all likelihood, it could have been a combination of these factors, as well as a lack of modern oral care and technology.

Although urban myth continues to say he had wooden teeth, he actually had a set of teeth carved likely from dairy cattle, elephant ivory or even hippopotamus. These face-disfiguring dentures were very uncomfortable and apparently were very ill fitting.

When Washington was sworn into office as the first President of the United States, he actually had swollen, burning gums. When his dentures would open and shut, they would clack and creak.

Washington was often in pain due to his oral decay, and it’s believed he would take pain killers (of that age) for this constant pain he experienced. It’s interesting because Presidents of that time were never supposed to show any sort of weakness or signs of pain.

George Washington’s dentures in the collection at Mount Vernon

George Washington’s dentures in the collection at Mount Vernon.

But what about the other Founding Fathers’ oral health and habits?

George Washington wasn’t the only one who lost many of his teeth: so did Benjamin Franklin. Franklin is said to have taken mercury pills for an illness, and as a result, he lost several teeth.

As far as daily oral health habits,  John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and James Monroe would have all likely brushed their teeth each day.

People during the 1700s would use a form of mouthwash, and sometimes a tongue scraper. Toothpowders were made of pumice, borax, roots and herbs and sometimes even burnt bread or tobacco! In actuality, these tooth powders could actually destroy the tooth enamel. For the “mouthwash,” our Founding Fathers may have used a solution that was a mix of herbs, resins of balsam, or myrrh.

And one more myth…

It’s a myth that Patrick Henry, famous for his “Give me Liberty, or give me death!” speech actually died of a toothache. In reality, he may have complained of a toothache, but he did not die of a toothache. He actually died due to cancer.

One thing is for sure: we know much more than we did during the time of our Founding Fathers, and we also have greater access to care and state-of-the-art dental technology to keep our smiles looking great for a lifetime.

Sources

http://www.mountvernon.org/research-collections/digital-encyclopedia/article/false-teeth/

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/29/upshot/george-washingtons-weakness-his-teeth.html?_r=0&abt=0002&abg=0

Lloyd, John; Mitchinson, John (2006). The Book of General Ignorance. New York: Harmony Books. p. 97. ISBN 978-0-307-39491-0. Retrieved July 3, 2011.

Glover, Barbara (Summer–Fall 1998). “George Washington—A Dental Victim”.The Riversdale Letter. Retrieved June 30, 2006.

Dentures, 1790–1799, George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate, Museum and Gardens

Mary V. Thompson, “The Private Life of George Washington’s Slaves”, Frontline, PBS

“The Portrait—George Washington:A National Treasure”. Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved January 21, 2011.

What Do the Results of X-rays Really Mean?

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

what to know about your x-rays by Hagen Dental DDS

Dentists use x-rays as a diagnostic tool for in-depth demonstration of your entire oral health.

Everyone’s mouth and state of oral health is different, but that’s why typically you have bitewing X-rays done once a year, and Panorex X-rays once every three years. (See more on that here.) If you have decay or periodontal disease that is detected or another known issue or risk factor, that might affect frequency of your x-rays.

Then what do the results of your x-rays really mean or show?

1. We have a baseline for the state of your oral health.

X-rays provide us with a complete demonstration of everything going on in your mouth. Remember x-rays allow us to see how decay and infections below the surface. This can help us as we work together to see a plan that ensures you are comfortable, and have confidence with all aspects of your oral health and smile.

If we can precisely determine and detect the amount of tooth decay you have, we are also able to watch that change over time. Digital X-rays will capture images of your entire mouth and those images are immediately available on our computer screen. With no development necessary, we can compare current images to older images, meaning we can see even the smallest changes that have occurred in your mouth.

2. We can see what the eye can’t always see.

Yes, we look at your tongue, teeth and gum when you visit us, but a clinical exam does not have the full power of a dental radiograph. When we use x-rays, we can better determine decay or cavities before they are visible to the naked eye. Here is a list of what x-rays allow us to better evaluate or uncover:

  • Developing or missing (or extra!) teeth
  • Abnormalities to the teeth
  • Tumors or cysts
  • Jaw issues
  • Hidden dental decay
  • Dental abscesses
  • Any bone loss from periodontal disease
  • Tarter build-up
  • The state of current fillings, crowns, etc.
  • Determine if there is enough bone for any necessary dental implants

What you could call a “normal” x-ray can show us that someone has no tooth decay, no damage to their bones, and no injuries to their teeth. Additional “normal” results show no cysts or signs of growths or anything such as an abscess. If we see tooth decay, signs of bone loss, cavities, any sort of damage to the bone, jaw fractures, changed in teeth placement, or any growths, we will be sure to talk about it with you. X-rays can save much time and unnecessary discomfort by seeing changes or problems early.

Want to learn more about our digital X-rays to make sure the pictures of your teeth, bones and soft tissues are up-to-date? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500 or visit our website here

7 Famous Smiles We Love

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

famous smiles a blog by hagen dental

It takes 43 muscles to frown, but only 2 to smile.

With that said, we wanted to highlight a few of the most well known smiles!

1. Mona Lisa

You’ve probably heard of Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa painting, since after all, it’s been called the most famous smile of all time. The Mona Lisa smile is one of the most intriguing and talked about smiles of all time, despite how she’s not even showing any teeth! It’s said that the “Mona Lisa” is actually a spelling error, and it should be “Monna Lisa,” which in Italian, is a short form of Madonna.

The painting lives in a dedicated, climate-controlled room that cost $7 million to build within the Louvre museum of Paris. Reports claim the painting is considered priceless, so it can’t be insured. The most popular belief is the woman Leonardo painted is Lisa Gherardini.

If you look close, the 24 year old has no eyebrows! A much-talked about question is why (or how) Mona Lisa appears to be smiling one moment, but the next she appears to be serious.

Is the Mona Lisa smile magical or can it be vanishing right in front of our eyes?

The answer is that much of what we see depends on lighting, visual pathways and even where we look on the painting.

2. Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple began her career at age 3, and won over people’s hearts in movies such as Heidi and Curley Top. She also sang the song “You Gotta Smile to be Happy,” which could make just about anyone smile. President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “As long as our country has Shirley Temple, we will be all right.” She will be remembered as the first child star and for her radiant smile.

3. Princess Diana

Very full of life and known to be shy, Princess Diana of Wales had a beautiful smile. The so-called “People’s Princess” was a fashion icon and also a philanthropist. She was very much covered in the media and many photographers aimed to get a photo of her bright smile.

4. George Clooney

No list of famous smiles would be complete without actor and director, George Clooney. George is frequently named as one of the most good-looking men in the world, and his smile helps him earn such honors.

5. Michael Jordan

“Air Jordan,” as he is sometimes called, is surely one of the best basketball players of all times—and he also has a great smile. With so many athletic accolades to his name, it is no wonder so many of MJ’s photos on the court and off, show him smiling!

6. Audrey Hepburn

Both an actress and humanitarian, Audrey Hepburn is one of the top fashion icons of all time. We think part of what makes her so fashionable, even to this day, is her one-of-a-kind smile.

7. Julia Roberts

No such list would be complete without Julia Roberts. Her smile has garnered so much attention because it is natural, symmetrical, and she has healthy, enviable gums.

Looking to increase your confidence when it comes to your smile? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500. Find our website here.

Easter Baskets That We Can Approve Of!

Sunday, April 6th, 2014

Americans will eat more than 700 million marshmallow Peeps and bunnies this Easter!

In fact at Easter time, the marshmallow treats will actually outsell jelly beans.

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This year for Easter, we thought we’d go over some of the better choices for treats to eat while celebrating Easter, as well as some explanation as to why these are actually better for your health.

First, let’s take a brief look at some of the not-so-great treat choices.

The sticky, hard kind of candy quite literally sticks to our teeth. This also means they stay suck to all the crevices and grooves we have in our teeth, which happen to be the places where we are most likely to get decay and plaque buildup. Just imagine the acid and sugar are “sitting” on your teeth when you eat these hard candies…

Beyond sticky candy such as taffy, candy that is filled with caramel or coconut, or any other fillings, are also bad for the teeth. A good rule of thumb to consider is that the longer the food can stick to your teeth, the longer the bacteria can feed on it.

Hard candies can also be a problem since we end up sucking on them. Again, we are exposing ourselves to the acid and sugar for longer periods of time.

So What Can I Do For Some Substitutes?

Here’s an excuse to reach for that chocolate bunny: the chocolate (without those fillings!) is not going to stick to your teeth as much. While eaten in excess it surely isn’t good for your teeth either, it’s an option that you might say is better than some of the others!

Consider other “treats” altogether.

You can also consider other sweet or delicious things to cater to your sweet tooth without all the negative effects on your teeth. For example, what about a cheese plate for the family to share? Cheese can actually work to protect your enamel and keep away the bad bacteria!

Another fun treat can be to eat a few hard-boiled eggs, and the whole family can help make them if you make deviled eggs. Many of us are dying them for an Easter activity, so why not eat an egg or two while we are at it?

In general, in the baked goods we eat at this time of year, you can also look to substitute whole-wheat flour for the standard flour.

How come, and why is this a good move for your teeth? White flour quickly breaks down into simple sugar. In fact, this process occurs while the food is still in your mouth. And, as you probably guessed, bacteria in your mouth feast on this sugar! Then what we see is that acid is produced and in turn, works at breaking down your enamel…On the other hand, whole wheat flour does not produce simple sugar as quickly as white flour does.

Another way to get rid of some of the processed sugar in your diet is select Greek yogurts, (unsweetened) applesauce, bananas or even things like prunes to add the sweetening without the processed sugar. If it fits your diet, look for recipes that use these ingredients instead of just refined sugar.

Another option is to consider choosing candies with Xylitol if you can find them. Assuming you do not have any sensitivity to Xylitol, these candies do not have the sugar that leads to cavities!

“Well, I’m going to eat a few candies this Easter, even if it isn’t ideal…”

You may be saying that you are still going to have a Peep or two, and that’s fine!

At least wait an hour before you brush your teeth after you devour all that candy in your Easter basket this year! That may seem counterintuitive, but that’s because the acid is sitting on your teeth, and you actually could worsen the harmful effects by brushing the acid onto your teeth when you brush.

So instead of reaching for the brush immediately, a simple and effective way to clean your teeth after you sit down for a few Peeps this year is “swishing” your mouth out with water. This helps flush out the acid and sugar.

Don’t be afraid to try something new and give a few dental products in your Easter basket this year. Yes, candy can be eaten, but we can also take care of ourselves so that we have a great smile for years to come!