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Archive for the ‘dental health’ Category

Is Sparkling Water Bad For My Teeth?

Monday, March 19th, 2018

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A carbonated drink, such as sparkling water, contains that satisfying fizz and crisp popping feeling that many of us love. But are those carbonated bubbles putting you at risk for tooth decay or dental issues? We’ve been asked that question, so let’s take a look at the answer!

Dental Erosion

As you likely know, erosion can be caused by many things both inside and outside the body. Factors such as vomiting and reflux, as well as acidic or harmful foods and beverages top the list. Carbonation gives beverages a lower pH, or in other words, a higher level of acidity (1).

So it begs the question – does that then mean that sparkling water can weaken your enamel, like other acidic foods and beverages?

What We Know About Sparkling Water & Your Teeth

The short answer: It turns out sparkling water is fine for your teeth!

That’s also backed by the American Dental Association, for those who are interested.

Studies have looked into how sparkling water compares to regular water, including how it can impact your teeth. The two forms of water—regular and sparkling—used in the commonly cited study showed no difference in their effect on the tooth enamel. This suggests that even with the increased acidity of sparkling water compared to flat water, there is no difference to your teeth.

So Where Can You Run Into Trouble?

The real danger to your teeth is in drinks that are sugary AND acidic, such as carbonated, sugary sodas or fruit drinks. The sugars found in these drinks increase likelihood of cavities, bacteria, and decay, on top of the risk of the higher acidity.

Another reason sugary, carbonated drinks are so much more potentially dangerous than flat or sparkling water is the high frequency in which they are consumed. The increased exposure to these elements erodes and damages the enamel over time (1, 2).

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Adding lemon or lime juice to your sparkling water, or drinking sparkling water that contains citrus flavors will have higher levels of acidity than plan water or unflavored sparkling water. This could increase the risk for damage to your tooth enamel, over time, more than unflavored sparkling water (2).

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Drink Safely

Plain drinks, such as water, or drinks containing high concentration of calcium, such as milk, can help reduce the risk of erosion. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away food debris, and keeps to maintain a moist, healthy environment inside the mouth (2).

Another tip is to drink the beverage all in one sitting or with a meal, rather than sipping on the drink all day long, which increases the acidic exposure time to your teeth. All-day sipping should be left to regular water! (We don’t even have to mention how that’s also probably best for your waistline!)

Mineral water contains additional mineral content of nutrients like calcium phosphate. These added minerals can help neutralize the potential damage of drinking the slightly more acidic sparkling beverage (3).

Last, if you do opt to drink beverages containing sugar, be sure to avoid and limit how many and how often you indulge in this practice. Limiting the frequency of which you drink flavored sparkling or carbonated soda and fruit drinks will help minimize the potential for erosion and damage (1).

Your Aim: Avoiding Too Much Acidity in Your Mouth

Your best dental health option is to avoid too much acid in the mouth. Plain water is the best choice when it comes to safe beverages for your oral health. But if you are choosing between a soft drink and sparkling water, the sparkling water is a much safer choice, and much more similar to plain water, than something with the sugar content of a soda or juice (3). Be sure to ask us if you have ANY questions.

Watch For Warning Signs

No matter what your dietary and beverage choices, it’s a smart idea to keep an eye out for warning signs that enamel erosion is occurring. Symptoms like tooth sensitivity to cold or hot temperatures, changes in color, or notches on the tooth can indicate weakening of this hard outer layer. Although tooth erosion is a gradual process, it’s problematic for the long-term health of your teeth, so be sure to tell us at the first sign of trouble.

Schedule An Appointment With Hagen Dental Practice 

Do you have concerns about how your nutrition impacts your oral health? If you see any warning signs of cavities or enamel erosion, schedule an appointment right away. We are here to help with all your dental needs! Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!

Give us a call at (513) 251-5500 today!



My Child Has Knocked Out a Tooth: What Should I Do Now?

Thursday, February 15th, 2018

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Let’s be honest: kids play hard! Sometimes very hard. Jumping, running, wrestling, diving, dodging, throwing, catching, sports, falling, tumbling, even fighting sometimes… and all these great physical activities leave the opportunity open for bumps, bruises, and injuries – including broken or knocked out teeth.

The bottom line is, accidents happen, and knowing what to do can be the difference between your child losing or saving the tooth!

Knocked Out Permanent Teeth?

If your child’s tooth is of the permanent variety – an adult tooth – keep it moist until you can see Dr. Hagen. First, find the tooth. You can rinse briefly with water if the tooth looks dirty. Do NOT scrub off any attached bits of tissue. If possible, try placing the tooth back in the socket (without touching the root). Another option is to place the tooth between their cheek and the gums.

Both of these options assume your child is old enough to avoid swallowing or spitting out and losing the tooth. Another handy option is to place the tooth into a container of milk and store it there until you can be seen. Then, head to our office or the emergency room as soon as possible (1).

others available to them, of course they will want to continue to take great care of their teeth through regular checkups with us flossing, and brushing! That’s key to remember.

Knocked Out Baby Teeth?

If your child is young, and the tooth that has been knocked out is a baby tooth, it’s still wise to find the tooth and keep it moist, such as in a container of milk. Try to only touch the tooth by the top, rather than the root. Just like an adult tooth, you can rinse briefly with water if the tooth looks dirty. But be sure NOT to scrub off any attached bits of tissue. Do NOT try to put a baby tooth back into the socket or in their mouth!

Visit Hagen Dental Practice as soon as possible, so he can determine if the entire tooth came out or not. We will want to examine the injury to ensure there was no damage to the underlying permanent tooth. Dr. Hagen will decide what the best course of action would be based on the child’s age, the status of the tooth, and other factors (1, 2).

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Dealing with the Knocked Out Tooth

If your child’s permanent tooth will not re-attach when you come in to see us, keep in mind that we have solutions to deal with the issue. That can include an implant or a bridge so that your child’s smile can be back to normal!

If you/you child pursues any of these options, be sure to continue taking great care of your teeth through regular check-ups and daily brushing and flossing.

Help Your Kids Avoid Knocked Out Or Damaged Teeth

There are some precautions you and your family can take when it comes to preventing tooth injuries.

  1. Have your child wear a mouth guard when they participate in sports or other high-impact activities.
  2. Teach them to avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and hard candy. These things can crack or damage teeth!
  3. If your child is young, assess their playing area. Are their unnecessary objects or hazards you can remove? Or, can you organize to help them play in a safer zone to reduce the risks to begin with?

One of the reasons we emphasize the importance of wearing a mouth guard is just how much it can prevent injury to the mouth. Mouth guards protect us against the following:

  • Dental fractures
  • Lacerations of lips, tongue, and cheeks
  • Avulsions
  • Luxations (joint dislocation, in this case, the jaw)
  • Concussions

Put simply, it isn’t just a chipped tooth or knocked out tooth…it can also be damage that is “much worse”!

Dental Emergencies Happen

With all that said, we know that dental emergencies happen! If you experience a dental emergency, it’s important to give our office a call (513) 251-5500. During non-office hours, an answering service will be able to help you and provide direction as to what to do for your specific emergency. You can also opt to visit the emergency room. If it is during our normal office hours, we will accommodate you as soon as possible: call right away and give us as much information as possible.

Remember, we are here to help you through any dental emergencies. Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.



E-Cigarettes & Your Health: Here’s What to Know

Wednesday, February 7th, 2018

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Electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, have taken over a large part of the market when it comes to alternatives for smoking. With e-cigarettes, no “smoke” is involved at all – instead these electronic devices use an aerosol technology to vaporize a solution of chemicals, nicotine, natural flavors and additives.

And, because of this, the term for using an e-cigarette is “vaping” instead of smoking. Let’s take a deeper look at these e-cigarettes and what it can mean for your health.

Are E-Cigarettes A Healthy Alternative To Smoking?

On the surface, vaping seems like it should be much safer than traditional smoking. And while it’s true that there is a reduction of negative health effects directly tied to smoking, e-cigarettes are not fully risk-free when it comes to the health status of your brain, body, and mouth.

As e-cigarettes sprang into the market and have risen in popularity over the last two decades, there has been a generalized assumption that they should be healthier than traditional cigarettes.

Unfortunately, there was a gap in information, since no long-term studies and relatively little research had been performed at the time of their introduction (1).

Translation: there’s many unknowns about just how bad this can be for your health!

E-Cigarettes: The Basics

It is true that e-cigarettes contain no tobacco, and emit fewer harmful byproducts than the burning produced by smoking tobacco cigarettes does. In fact, the Surgeon General reports that e-cigarettes are, overall, lower risk for your health than traditional tobacco products, BUT it does not claim they are risk-free (2).

One of the biggest long-term challenges with the electronic cigarette is the fact that it still contains the highly addictive substance nicotine. The biggest risk, according to the Surgeon General, is the trend for teens and young adults to begin using the product, and then convert to traditional tobacco cigarettes later in life.

This habit becomes a bigger problem for one’s health (3). Furthermore, because e-cigarettes have gained popularity in a younger market, the nicotine can cause harm to the developing brain of young adults or teens (4).

To complicate the matter, as we pointed out, long-term studies are still in progress, and just beginning to produce information about their use, so we can’t be completely sure about the long-term risks that will occur from vaping (5).

There is a widespread misconception that an e-cigarette’s aerosol is comprised of harmless water vapor. Although it’s true that it contains fewer toxins than smoked tobacco products, an e-cigarette still exposes its user to various chemicals and volatile compounds which are all known to have adverse health effects (6).

So, Is Vaping “Safe” For Your Mouth…and Your Health?

It’s also a common misconception that vaping is less harmful than traditional cigarettes when it comes to the mouth. Smokeless cigarettes have been found to promote dental disease, cause tissue inflammation, increase gum recession, and cause damage comparable to, and in some cases worse than, the damage caused with the use of regular cigarettes (7).

According to studies reported in the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA), there are several ways in which e-cigarettes can cause health issues, just to name a few:

Mouth And Throat Disease

Just like smoking a cigarette, vaping an e-cigarette can still increase the possibility of developing mouth or throat cancer or disease because of the harsh chemical agents in the aerosol (4).

Injury And Damage

There have been accounts of defective batteries or equipment, resulting in fires or explosions in the oral cavity. These incidents can cause incredible injury and damage to the mouth that may require intensive medical care (4).

Dry Mouth

Vaping causes dry mouth. Without enough natural saliva, you are prone to tooth decay, bacteria buildup and bad breath. This is because the natural saliva and environment of the mouth is altered (4).

Grinding Of The Jaw

Nicotine is a stimulant, and as such, it fires up the muscles. If you’re already a grinder, this encourages you to grind your teeth more intensely. If you are not a grinder, it could actually prompt you to start grinding your teeth. Tooth grinding can lead to TMJ pain/disorders, loss of enamel, tooth sensitivity or tooth decay, as well as worsening of periodontal disease (8).

Other Changes In The Mouth

Another issue is the nicotine itself, which has been shown to harm the mouth, gums and tongue – whether inhaled via e-cigarette or smoked via traditional cigarette. Nicotine reduces blood flow, thus restricting nutrient and oxygen supply to the tissues of the oral cavity. This can lead to gum recession. It also impacts the mouth’s inherent ability to fight off bacteria, putting the user at higher risk for infection or decay. Even worse, vaping can mask the signs of gum disease, making it harder for us to diagnose when you come to your appointment (4, 9).

What’s The Verdict?

cincinnati dentist and vaping

As mentioned above, e-cigarettes have not been fully studied to date. As more data is gathered, we learn more about what to expect as far as any health ramifications for this trendy little device.

From a dental health standpoint, the lack of burning byproducts from smoke and the absence of tobacco IS a positive feature of e-cigarettes as compared with traditional tobacco use. However, these electronic substitutions are still VERY detrimental to your oral health, and we recommend avoiding their use altogether.

Schedule An Appointment With Hagen Dental Practice

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Do you have questions about your oral health? If you vape, you should know about the risks of the habit, and be sure to keep your regular visits with us to help protect the health of your teeth and gums, and catch issues in the mouth early on. We want to help you on your health journey, no matter where you are at today.

We are here to help with all your dental needs! Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!

Give us a call at (513) 251-5500 today!



  7. Sundar IK, Javed F, Romanos GE, Rahman I. Oncotarget. 2016 Oct 24. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.12857  E-cigarettes and flavorings induce inflammatory and pro-senescence responses in oral epithelial cells and periodontal fibroblasts



How To Take Care Of Your Dentures

Tuesday, January 30th, 2018

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Dentures are a fantastic option for anyone who has lost some or all of their teeth. Dentures benefit both your appearance and your health in a variety of ways. The loss of teeth can impact daily activities like smiling, eating, and speaking. These things are easy to take for granted until a problem arises.

Dentures improve eating and speaking ability (after some practice) by restoring the dimensions of your oral cavity. They also give the wearer a full set of teeth for a wide, confident smile. They can be made to mimic the look of natural teeth, and serve to support the cheeks, lips, and facial muscles to keep the facial tissues from sagging and creating a more aged look (1).

Caring For Dentures

Just like natural teeth, dentures require good daily oral hygiene habits to keep your mouth free of infection, irritation and complications. Regular cleaning also prevents denture stains and bacteria buildup (2).

Clean Your Dentures Every Day

You wouldn’t skip brushing your teeth daily – nor should you skip brushing and cleaning your dentures! Ideally, you should clean your dentures after each meal, but at a minimum, this should be done when you take them out every night.

To clean, remove the denture from your mouth and rinse off any food particles. Brush the denture gently using denture cleaning and a brush specially designed for cleaning dentures. You could also use a soft-bristled toothbrush. The key is to avoid any damage to the dentures that harder bristles could cause (1).

Avoid Using Toothpaste On The Dentures

Although dentures are used as replacement teeth, they are composed of different material than bone, so different cleaning applications are required. A non-abrasive cleanser – such as gentle liquid dish soap – is effective on dentures. Toothpaste, bleach, and powdered household cleansers, however, often contain abrasive particles that can damage the denture base or the denture teeth, so these should never be used to clean your dentures (2, 3).

Because denture cleaners are not designed to use in the mouth, be sure to rinse the denture well after cleaning or soaking it. Some of the chemicals from the soap may not be suitable for ingestion. We recommend denture cleansers that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. This symbolizes safety and effectiveness (1).

Handle With Care

Your dentures can be delicate! Dropping them onto a hard surface can result in cracks, chips, or breakage. We recommend standing over a sink filled with water or over a folded towel while you are cleaning the denture to avoid damage if you accidentally drop it (2).

Keep Your Dentures Wet

While your denture is out of your mouth, store it in water or a denture cleansing solution. Alternatively, you could use a solution of half water and half mouthwash. A denture that dries out can lose its shape, warp, or lose its pliability. Avoid storing it in hot water, which can also warp its shape (2).

Avoid Denture Adhesives

There are instances in which denture adhesive could be helpful. However, a typical denture should seal to the gums with just a light layer of saliva and a good fit. If you find you are requiring adhesive to comfortably wear your dentures, it could signal adjustments or replacement is necessary (2).

Give our office a call to schedule a check-up if this is happening to you.

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Caring For Your Mouth When You Have Dentures

Give Your Mouth A Break

To avoid irritation of the tissues covered by dentures, they should NOT be worn 24 hours a day. Typically, a good rule of thumb is to take the dentures out at bedtime and put them back in when you wake up. Ideally, your mouth should get at least 8 hours break from their wear (1, 3).

Check The Fit Regularly

Always pay attention to the fit of your dentures. If something doesn’t feel right, schedule an appointment to have it checked out. Ill-fitting dentures can cause irritation, mouth sores, or infection. We are trained to evaluate and repair any damage to the equipment, and to modify for any changes in the fit of your dentures.

Brush Like Usual

It’s still important to brush your gums, tongue, cheeks, and the roof of your mouth every morning and night, just as you used to brush your teeth. We recommend using a soft-bristled brush. This habit is helpful for increasing circulation in the oral tissues, removing plaque from the mouth, preventing bad breath, and starting the day clean before putting in your dentures (1, 3).

Diet Still Counts

Just as it is important for those with natural teeth to eat a balanced diet and avoid excessive sugars and acids, so too is this habit important for denture-wearers. A healthy diet plays a key role in the health of your mouth, whether you have a full set of natural teeth, a partial set, or a full set of dentures!

Regular Oral Exams

Even if you’ve lost all your natural teeth, regular oral exams are important. The dental examination can detect signs of disease, infection, or any changes in the health of your mouth, neck, throat, and head.

Dentures last about 5 to 10 years, and sometimes need work, alterations, and tune-ups to keep them functioning at their best. Regular dental checkups help to ensure your dentures are working best for you as changes occur in your mouth and as wear and tear happens to your dentures.

Schedule An Appointment With Hagen Dental Practice

Do you have questions about your dentures or your oral health? We are here to help with all your dental and denture needs! Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!  Or, give us a call at (513) 251-5500 today!




What Your Tongue Says About Your Health (INFOGRAPHIC)

Friday, January 5th, 2018

Hagen-Infographic-What Your Tongue Says About Your Health

See the PDF version of the “Your Tongue Can Indicate Your State of Health” infographic here.

Mouth Sores: The Basics You Should Know

Monday, December 4th, 2017

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True dental health involves the entire mouth, so we’re trained to examine and identify problems with all the tissues of the mouth! Sores and irritations are common occurrences in the mouth.

Read on to learn about the most common oral sores, some of their causes, what you can do, and more.

Causes Of Mouth Sores

Sores in the mouth can stem from a variety of causes, including:

  • Infections from bacteria, viruses or fungus (1).
  • Irritation from a broken tooth, filling, piercing, loose orthodontic wire or other sharp appliance, or a denture that doesn’t fit (1).
  • Sores can be a symptom of a greater disease or disorder (1).
  • Immune system challenges and problems (2).

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The Most Common Mouth Sores

1. Canker Sores:

Canker sores develop in the soft tissues of the mouth, including the tongue, gums, uvula, or insides of the cheeks. They are typically white or gray sores with a red border. The good news about canker sores is they are NOT contagious. Their cause is hard to pinpoint, but could be related to other immune issues, oral hygiene issues, food irritation, stress, bacteria, viruses, or even trauma to the soft tissue (2).

Canker sores will typically heal on their own; however, it can take several days up to two weeks. If they are painful or causing problems with eating or talking, over-the-counter mouthwashes and pain killers designed for this type of sore can provide relief and help during the healing process. While a canker sore is healing, spicy, acidic, and overly salty foods should be avoided to minimize irritation and pain (2).

 2. Cold Sores:

Cold sores are also known as fever blisters. They present as a group of fluid-filled blisters around the lips, under the nose, or even around the chin. Cold sores are caused by the herpes simplex type 1 virus, and are VERY contagious. The initial infection of this virus will often be confused with a cold or flu. The main difference is that painful sores and lesions will emerge throughout the mouth (3).

Once a person is infected, the virus stays in the body and will cause periodic attacks. Some people notice that stress or other immune challenges can bring on an eruption. Cold sores will usually heal in about a week by themselves. If the blister is painful, over-the-counter topical medications can provide some pain relief. If the breakouts are severe or frequent, we can also prescribe antiviral drugs (3).

3. Thrush:

Thrush is a fungal infection that occurs when the yeast known as Candida albicans becomes overgrown in the oral cavity. It can reproduce rapidly in large numbers, causing an overgrowth and subsequent thrush infection (4).

Thrush is most common in people with weakened immune systems, in which the body’s own defenses can’t keep the Candida albicans in check. This population includes the very young, the elderly, or those who are affected by other diseases, such as diabetes or leukemia. Dry mouth syndromes and denture use both also make thrush more likely. Another risk factor is antibiotic treatment, which decreases the normal bacterial flora in the mouth, and gives Candida yeast a chance to flourish (4).

The best way to prevent and control thrush is focusing on good oral hygiene as well as controlling or preventing the conditions that make Candida more likely to reproduce rapidly (4).

cincinnati dentist4. Leukoplakia:

Leukoplakia are patches that form on the inside of the cheeks, gums or tongue. They are thick and whitish in color. They are caused by excessive cell growth (5).

Leukoplakia can result from irritations in the mouth, such as ill-fitting dentures or appliances, or in the case of people who are in the habit of chewing on the insides of the cheeks. These lesions are also common among tobacco users. Leukoplakia can, in some cases, be associated with oral cancer. We need to evaluate the lesion and might recommend a biopsy if the leukoplakia patch looks dangerous (5).

Removing and quitting those irritations that can result in leukoplakia are the first steps in treatment. For example, quitting tobacco or replacing anything ill-fitting appliances in the mouth are one of the first recommendations when dealing with leukoplakia from these causes (5).

We Are Here To Help!

While none of this is medical advice, these are some of the basics to know about when it comes to mouth sores. All mouth sores that last longer than a week should be examined by a dentist! Have you noticed new or recent sores in your mouth? Do you have a question about an unusual change in your oral soft tissue? It’s important that you have us analyze and take a look to rule out anything sinister or life-threatening. Whether for your next appointment or for another reason, be sure to give us a call at (513) 251-5500.



4 Things to Know About Acid Reflux

Monday, November 20th, 2017

what is acid reflux hagen

Acid reflux: it’s when small amounts of our stomach acid travel into the esophagus or even our mouth.

Symptoms of acid reflux include heartburn which is best described as a burning pain and discomfort in your throat area, chest area or around your abdomen. Other symptoms include a sour or bitter taste in your throat (also called regurgitation).

Other symptoms people experience include bloating, a feeling that food is stuck in your throat, burping, black stools, dry cough, sore throat, hoarseness for no reason, and more.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as GERD, is a more serious form of reflux. Although a medical professional can diagnose you either way, GERD includes more persistent heartburn. It is heartburn that is sometimes also accompanied by coughing, wheezing, chest pain and possibly regurgitation. Sometimes the symptoms get worse at night.

Here are 4 more things to know about acid reflux.

#1: Acid reflux can have a negative effect on your teeth.

Both acid reflux and GERD can put you or your child at greater risk for tooth erosion and periodontal issues.

That’s because the acid can damage the enamel—as well as the dentin. Just like acid from foods can, over time, damage your teeth, so can acid that comes from your own body. Stomach acid can also irritate the esophagus.

#2. But you can do something if you have acid reflux!

First, follow your doctor’s advice to reduce symptoms and to get to the cause of your issue. This may include avoiding trigger such as spicy foods, tomato, citrus fruits, raw onions, alcohol and coffee, just to name a few (3).

Next, be sure to let us know! We can help you come up with a plan to combat the acid that may be coming in contact with your teeth.

Even our little ones can get acid reflux! If your child has acid reflux, let us know, including any changes in their medication related to acid reflux. It may even require an additional visit or two to the dentist so that their teeth can be properly watched.

Since kids don’t always know what is “normal” in terms of acid reflux, or not having acid reflux, they might not be able to report that they are having it. Or they can simply be too young to tell you! If you spot any signs, be sure to ask them or take them to their doctor.

A general rule of thumb if your child has a history of acid reflux: be sure to take extra special care of their teeth! After all, a recent student found that kids with reflux are about six times more likely to experience damage to their enamel compared with kids who do not have acid reflux (1, 2, 3). That’s where fluoride and prescription toothpaste can help.

Don’t forget: we can help spot signs and symptoms of acid reflux (and tooth erosion) in your mouth.

#3. Look at your diet if you have symptoms of acid reflux.

Can dietary changes help ease or get rid of the symptoms? In some cases, yes! A first step can be to eliminate sugar from your diet. Then reduce how much soda you drink and cut back on fruit or other acidic drinks. n some cases, if you drink something acidic, you can benefit from rinsing out your mouth after. Another tip: stay hydrated with water, since water (and your saliva) supports the natural way of getting rid of enamel-eating acids.

Other lifestyle factors that can contribute to, or worsen, acid reflux include:

Smoking (just one more reason to quit!)

  • Size of meals
  • Posture and way of sleeping
  • Certain clothes (if they are super tight around the waist)
  • Being overweight
  • Certain medications (1, 2, 3) 

fighting acid reflux hagen dental practice


#4. Foods can also ease acid reflux, in some cases.

It’s true that so many foods can worse, or create, acid reflux issues or symptoms. But, your diet can also help take away the discomfort, too.

Foods that can sometimes ease acid reflux include:

  • Green vegetables
  • Many lean meats
  • Oatmeal
  • Non-citrous fruits like melons or bananas (1, 2, 3)

Dental Health For Your Whole Family

Talk to us if you believe you or a child has symptoms of acid reflux. Regular checkups with Dr. Hagen are crucial to maintaining a healthy mouth! Have questions or need to schedule your next appointment? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.



Diabetes Prevention Is In Your Hands…And Your Mouth!

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Sugar and nutrition are the culprits behind many health concerns. You’ve heard us talk about limiting sugar for your oral health: cleaning up your diet and incorporating healthier lifestyle choices makes sense for your dental hygiene as well as your entire body’s future health!

Diabetes: Here’s What to Know

There are many reasons to attempt to avoid developing diabetes. Diabetes puts you at risk for additional health concerns, such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease. Another complication is an increased risk for gum problems, since poor blood glucose control makes gum problems more likely. In fact, the relationship goes both ways. New research suggests that gum disease can also affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. To make matters worse, those with diabetes are more likely to develop thrush, dry mouth, and experience tooth loss (1, 2).

Type 2 diabetes is now the most common – and preventable – type of diabetes. Making lifestyle choices that support your health and prevent this disease is the best and biggest way to take a step towards prevention (3). It might surprise you to learn that sugar intake isn’t the only cause of diabetes: it’s actually a multi-factorial issue.

Tips To Preventing Diabetes

If you are overweight, have a family history of diabetes, lead a sedentary lifestyle, or currently include high amounts of sugar in your diet, you should make diabetes prevention a priority. Check out these prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association (3). Not only will these tips help prevent diabetes; they will help you maintain great oral health in the process. And we think that is win-win!

1. Aim to Eat More Nutrient Dense Foods

You have heard us talk about the health concerns of too much sugar in your diet. Sugar can sit in your mouth after eating, causing increased bacteria growth, decay, and damage to your teeth and gums. But it is also the culprit behind many health conditions. Excess sugar intake can lead to blood sugar control problems as well as weight gain, both of which are risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes.

Increasing your fiber intake brings prevention into your hands and mouth in several ways. It helps improve your blood sugar control, it lowers your risk of heart disease, and it promotes weight loss by helping you feel full for longer. In addition, fibrous food’s rough quality helps keep your teeth cleaner – a perk we are on board with!

What foods are high in fiber? Think roughage foods – vegetables, beans, fruits, whole grains and nuts. These foods pack a lot of bulky substance as well as nutrition. We call these nutrient-dense foods, compared to their more “empty calorie” high-sugar, low-fiber counterparts, such as processed candies, crackers, cookies and snacks.

Whole grains also help reduce your risk of diabetes and maintain blood sugar levels. Unlike refined sugar products, whole grains take longer to digest, thus dumping sugars into your blood more slowly (3).

2. Become More Physically Active

Regular exercise helps you lose weight, or maintain a healthy weight. It also burns calories and lowers your blood sugar – that energy currently in your blood waiting to be used or stored as fat for later. Exercise has also been found to boost your sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity is necessary to transfer sugar out of your blood into cells and helps keep your blood sugar within a normal, healthy range.

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ALL types of exercise help control diabetes! But the very best benefit comes when your fitness routine includes both cardio and resistance training. So mix it up! But most importantly, get moving: A sedentary lifestyle means increased risk for diabetes (3).

3. Lose A Few Extra Pounds

Being overweight also increases your risk of Type 2 diabetes. Don’t be overwhelmed if you feel like you have a long way to go! Every pound you lose can improve your health status. A recent study found that those who decreased their weight by just 7% saw a 60% reduction in diabetes risk. However, avoid fad diets. Lifestyle changes, such as diet changes and exercise, are the safest and most effective tools to achieving long-lasting weight loss and health benefits (3).

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Your Oral Health and Overall Health Are Connected

The Surgeon General’s “Report on Oral Health” reminds us that good oral health is vital to our body’s general health. Regular brushing, flossing, and a conscious effort to eat healthfully make a huge impact – not only in your mouth – but for your other body systems as well (2).

Working towards the lifestyles changes mentioned above can reverse prediabetes, lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, improve your health overall, help you feel more energetic, and reduce your chances of diabetic-related oral health issues (4).

Keep Us In The Loop!

People with diabetes have special needs. All of us at Hagen Dental Practice are equipped to meet those needs, so be sure to tell us if you have diabetes! Keep us informed of any changes in your condition, as well as about any medication you might be taking.

Good Dental Health For All

Whether you are diabetic, pre-diabetic, or neither, regular checkups with Dr. Hagen are crucial to maintaining a healthy mouth and detecting oral health concerns early. Have questions or need to schedule your next appointment? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.



Do You Know the Top 5 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer?

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

what to know oral cancer

Oral cancer: it’s a serious subject, and for good reason!

Cancer, as you may or may not know, is when cells in our body begin to grow in a way that is out of control. Really, any cell in our body can become cancerous.

So what about cancer of the mouth or “oral cancer”? (more…)

Spookily Healthy Halloween Treats (That Aren’t Bad For Your Kids’ Teeth!)

Friday, October 27th, 2017

Don’t want to be spooked by cavities? Then it’s time for some healthy treats for you and your family this Halloween! We rounded up 10 ideas that are good for you but still taste like a treat!

1. Frankenstein Kiwi

healthy recipes for halloween hagen dental practice

Take a vegetable peeler and cut off part of the kiwi skin, as shown. Then you can use your hands to pull back more of the skin to make it “jagged,” shaping the Frankenstein’s hair in the process.

Next, you can also cut part of the kiwi off so that it can sit flat. Then add small, dried blueberries or mini chocolate chips for eyes (or something else you have handy!). Poke in pretzel sticks for a mouth and “arms,” and your Frankenstein Kiwi is complete!

Image and Recipe via Two Healthy Kitchens

2. Spooky Spider Dip

Ftomatoes healthy recipe for your teethirst, pick out a large pepper that you can cut, hollowing it out. You want to cut it so that it will resemble a spider-body-shape. For eyes, consider using black olives that have been cut into triangles. Next cut out slivers of your pepper and set aside; Those will be your 8 spider legs that you will add once you’ve added your dip to the bowl.

For your dip, consider edamame hummus or another kind of dip your family loves. Edamame hummus is great because it’s green. Then set it up with a bowl, and add vegetables such as celery, carrots, or tomatoes for dipping on your tray. Spooky…but delicious!

Image and Recipe via Two Healthy Kitchens

3. Carrot Pumpkins

For the skilled slicer, this snack is for you! Super large carrots make this one easier. First, taking your knife, make slits lengthwise down your carrot. The distance between cuts will determine and shape the width of your pumpkin stem. The depth of your cut will shape the height of the stem.

You’ll then make a precise, perpendicular cut from the edge of the carrot until it just intersects the first cut you made. Then repeat on the other side. To make your pumpkin round, then you can round out the corners if needed. Then make all your pumpkin slices, completing your pumpkins!

Image and Recipe via Little Dairy on the Prairie

4. Spooky Banana Ghosts

healthy banana recipe hagen dental practice

All you need for this one is bananas, peanut butter or a nut butter alternative, dark chocolate chips or even raisins! Simply slice your bananas in half and then use your peanut butter (or nut butter) to create a spooky mouth and your eyes! Then, place your raisins or chocolate chips onto to the banana, right on top of the peanut butter so they will stick. Boo! You’re done.

Image and Recipe via Nutri Savings Blog

5. Frankenstein Green Smoothie

healthy hagen dental recipes Frankenstein Green SmoothieThis is one treat more likely to be loved by the adults, but it’s still fun for everyone! If you have plastic glasses, use some black cardstock and tape to create a Frankenstein-like look. You can even use stick googly eyes if you have them.

For the green drink itself, use two cups of leafy greens (spinach, kale, collards, bok choy or another), 2 cups liquid (water, almond milk, coconut water, etc.) and then 3 cups of ripe fruit (kiwi, banana, mango, berries, peach, pear, grapes or a combination!)

Of course depending on the exact fruit you use, it may be more or less green!

Images and Recipes via The Ot Tool Box and 100 Days of Real Food

6. Fun…Yet Frightening Fruit Plate

Here’s one that can be quick but is sure to make everyone smile. Take fruit like dried apricots, strawberries, grapes, mini oranges, small apples or whatever else you have on hand. After washing and drying, add some candy eyeballs. (Wilton eyeballs is one brand you can search for on Amazon.) If you have it, you can use edible glue! If not, consider using a nut butter to “stick on” your eyes.

Image and Recipe via Modern Parents Messy Kids

banana recipe healthy recipe for hagen dental practice cincinnati7. Pirate Bananas (Argh!)

If you have a bunch of bananas, consider using pen to make pirate faces right on the peel.

Then you can use a bit of fabric, tied around the banana’s “waist” to complete your pirate outfit!

Photo and Recipe via Grubby Little Faces

8. Devil(ed) Eggs

deviled eggs healthy recipe for hagen dental patientsStart with your traditional recipe for deviled eggs. For example: 6 hard boiled eggs, cut in half, and then mix .25 cup mayonnaise, 1.5 sweet pickle relish, 1.4 teaspoons yellow mustard, .25 teaspoons garlic powder, and add a pinch of salt.

Here’s where you get to be creative: take a six ounce can of whole, pitted black olives (be sure to get the whole canned black olives to allow you to shape your spider body).

Have some fun cutting the olives in half into a spider body—then you can slice your half olives long-wise, for 4 legs. Next: simply arrange around your olive halves to form a spider on top of your egg!

Image and Recipe via A Side of Sweet blog

pumpkin recipe for hagen dental9. Pumpkin Plate

All you need here is a bunch of baby carrots, some cauliflower, your choice of hummus or another dip and some lettuce to use as garnish!

Simply shape into a pumpkin, and you are ready to serve. Put your pumpkin on a cutting board or a plate.

Image via Pinterest

10. Mummified Apple Sauce

 Mummified Apple SauceTake your favorite brand of apple sauce pouch, some googly eyes, and then get some white crepe paper.

Using scissors, cut crepe paper about 2 yards long.

Then start to make your mummy by wrapping your pouch! Seal the end with glue. Add the googly eyes and you are ready to serve!

Image and Recipe via See Vanessa Craft

Hagen Dental Practice: Your Choice for Trusted Dentistry

Looking to set up your next dentist appointment with us? Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.