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February 15th, 2018

My Child Has Knocked Out a Tooth: What Should I Do Now?

Category: dental health

tooth knocked out hagen dental practice

Let’s be honest: kids play hard! Sometimes very hard. Jumping, running, wrestling, diving, dodging, throwing, catching, sports, falling, tumbling, even fighting sometimes… and all these great physical activities leave the opportunity open for bumps, bruises, and injuries – including broken or knocked out teeth.

The bottom line is, accidents happen, and knowing what to do can be the difference between your child losing or saving the tooth!

Knocked Out Permanent Teeth?

If your child’s tooth is of the permanent variety – an adult tooth – keep it moist until you can see Dr. Hagen. First, find the tooth. You can rinse briefly with water if the tooth looks dirty. Do NOT scrub off any attached bits of tissue. If possible, try placing the tooth back in the socket (without touching the root). Another option is to place the tooth between their cheek and the gums.

Both of these options assume your child is old enough to avoid swallowing or spitting out and losing the tooth. Another handy option is to place the tooth into a container of milk and store it there until you can be seen. Then, head to our office or the emergency room as soon as possible (1).

others available to them, of course they will want to continue to take great care of their teeth through regular checkups with us flossing, and brushing! That’s key to remember.

Knocked Out Baby Teeth?

If your child is young, and the tooth that has been knocked out is a baby tooth, it’s still wise to find the tooth and keep it moist, such as in a container of milk. Try to only touch the tooth by the top, rather than the root. Just like an adult tooth, you can rinse briefly with water if the tooth looks dirty. But be sure NOT to scrub off any attached bits of tissue. Do NOT try to put a baby tooth back into the socket or in their mouth!

Visit Hagen Dental Practice as soon as possible, so he can determine if the entire tooth came out or not. We will want to examine the injury to ensure there was no damage to the underlying permanent tooth. Dr. Hagen will decide what the best course of action would be based on the child’s age, the status of the tooth, and other factors (1, 2).

avoid dental emergencies hagen dental in cincinnati ohio

Dealing with the Knocked Out Tooth

If your child’s permanent tooth will not re-attach when you come in to see us, keep in mind that we have solutions to deal with the issue. That can include an implant or a bridge so that your child’s smile can be back to normal!

If you/you child pursues any of these options, be sure to continue taking great care of your teeth through regular check-ups and daily brushing and flossing.

Help Your Kids Avoid Knocked Out Or Damaged Teeth

There are some precautions you and your family can take when it comes to preventing tooth injuries.

  1. Have your child wear a mouth guard when they participate in sports or other high-impact activities.
  2. Teach them to avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and hard candy. These things can crack or damage teeth!
  3. If your child is young, assess their playing area. Are their unnecessary objects or hazards you can remove? Or, can you organize to help them play in a safer zone to reduce the risks to begin with?

One of the reasons we emphasize the importance of wearing a mouth guard is just how much it can prevent injury to the mouth. Mouth guards protect us against the following:

  • Dental fractures
  • Lacerations of lips, tongue, and cheeks
  • Avulsions
  • Luxations (joint dislocation, in this case, the jaw)
  • Concussions

Put simply, it isn’t just a chipped tooth or knocked out tooth…it can also be damage that is “much worse”!

Dental Emergencies Happen

With all that said, we know that dental emergencies happen! If you experience a dental emergency, it’s important to give our office a call (513) 251-5500. During non-office hours, an answering service will be able to help you and provide direction as to what to do for your specific emergency. You can also opt to visit the emergency room. If it is during our normal office hours, we will accommodate you as soon as possible: call right away and give us as much information as possible.

Remember, we are here to help you through any dental emergencies. Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/dental-care-concerns/dental-emergencies
  2. http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Publications/Files/ADA_PatientSmart_Emergencies.pdf?la=en

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February 7th, 2018

E-Cigarettes & Your Health: Here’s What to Know

Category: dental health

cincinnati dentist

Electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, have taken over a large part of the market when it comes to alternatives for smoking. With e-cigarettes, no “smoke” is involved at all – instead these electronic devices use an aerosol technology to vaporize a solution of chemicals, nicotine, natural flavors and additives.

And, because of this, the term for using an e-cigarette is “vaping” instead of smoking. Let’s take a deeper look at these e-cigarettes and what it can mean for your health.

Are E-Cigarettes A Healthy Alternative To Smoking?

On the surface, vaping seems like it should be much safer than traditional smoking. And while it’s true that there is a reduction of negative health effects directly tied to smoking, e-cigarettes are not fully risk-free when it comes to the health status of your brain, body, and mouth.

As e-cigarettes sprang into the market and have risen in popularity over the last two decades, there has been a generalized assumption that they should be healthier than traditional cigarettes.

Unfortunately, there was a gap in information, since no long-term studies and relatively little research had been performed at the time of their introduction (1).

Translation: there’s many unknowns about just how bad this can be for your health!

E-Cigarettes: The Basics

It is true that e-cigarettes contain no tobacco, and emit fewer harmful byproducts than the burning produced by smoking tobacco cigarettes does. In fact, the Surgeon General reports that e-cigarettes are, overall, lower risk for your health than traditional tobacco products, BUT it does not claim they are risk-free (2).

One of the biggest long-term challenges with the electronic cigarette is the fact that it still contains the highly addictive substance nicotine. The biggest risk, according to the Surgeon General, is the trend for teens and young adults to begin using the product, and then convert to traditional tobacco cigarettes later in life.

This habit becomes a bigger problem for one’s health (3). Furthermore, because e-cigarettes have gained popularity in a younger market, the nicotine can cause harm to the developing brain of young adults or teens (4).

To complicate the matter, as we pointed out, long-term studies are still in progress, and just beginning to produce information about their use, so we can’t be completely sure about the long-term risks that will occur from vaping (5).

There is a widespread misconception that an e-cigarette’s aerosol is comprised of harmless water vapor. Although it’s true that it contains fewer toxins than smoked tobacco products, an e-cigarette still exposes its user to various chemicals and volatile compounds which are all known to have adverse health effects (6).

So, Is Vaping “Safe” For Your Mouth…and Your Health?

It’s also a common misconception that vaping is less harmful than traditional cigarettes when it comes to the mouth. Smokeless cigarettes have been found to promote dental disease, cause tissue inflammation, increase gum recession, and cause damage comparable to, and in some cases worse than, the damage caused with the use of regular cigarettes (7).

According to studies reported in the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA), there are several ways in which e-cigarettes can cause health issues, just to name a few:

Mouth And Throat Disease

Just like smoking a cigarette, vaping an e-cigarette can still increase the possibility of developing mouth or throat cancer or disease because of the harsh chemical agents in the aerosol (4).

Injury And Damage

There have been accounts of defective batteries or equipment, resulting in fires or explosions in the oral cavity. These incidents can cause incredible injury and damage to the mouth that may require intensive medical care (4).

Dry Mouth

Vaping causes dry mouth. Without enough natural saliva, you are prone to tooth decay, bacteria buildup and bad breath. This is because the natural saliva and environment of the mouth is altered (4).

Grinding Of The Jaw

Nicotine is a stimulant, and as such, it fires up the muscles. If you’re already a grinder, this encourages you to grind your teeth more intensely. If you are not a grinder, it could actually prompt you to start grinding your teeth. Tooth grinding can lead to TMJ pain/disorders, loss of enamel, tooth sensitivity or tooth decay, as well as worsening of periodontal disease (8).

Other Changes In The Mouth

Another issue is the nicotine itself, which has been shown to harm the mouth, gums and tongue – whether inhaled via e-cigarette or smoked via traditional cigarette. Nicotine reduces blood flow, thus restricting nutrient and oxygen supply to the tissues of the oral cavity. This can lead to gum recession. It also impacts the mouth’s inherent ability to fight off bacteria, putting the user at higher risk for infection or decay. Even worse, vaping can mask the signs of gum disease, making it harder for us to diagnose when you come to your appointment (4, 9).

What’s The Verdict?

cincinnati dentist and vaping

As mentioned above, e-cigarettes have not been fully studied to date. As more data is gathered, we learn more about what to expect as far as any health ramifications for this trendy little device.

From a dental health standpoint, the lack of burning byproducts from smoke and the absence of tobacco IS a positive feature of e-cigarettes as compared with traditional tobacco use. However, these electronic substitutions are still VERY detrimental to your oral health, and we recommend avoiding their use altogether.

Schedule An Appointment With Hagen Dental Practice

schedule your dental cleaning

Do you have questions about your oral health? If you vape, you should know about the risks of the habit, and be sure to keep your regular visits with us to help protect the health of your teeth and gums, and catch issues in the mouth early on. We want to help you on your health journey, no matter where you are at today.

We are here to help with all your dental needs! Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!

Give us a call at (513) 251-5500 today!

 

Sources:

  1. https://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2014-archive/september/nidcr-proposes-ecigarette-research
  2. http://www.casaa.org/historical-timeline-of-electronic-cigarettes/
  3. https://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2016-archive/december/surgeon-general-report-e-cigarette-use-a-major-public-health-concern
  4. http://jada.ada.org/article/S0002-8177(17)30866-8/pdf
  5. https://www.deltadental.com/us/en/protect-my-smile/overall-health/e-cigarettes.html
  6. https://e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov/documents/2016_SGR_Full_Report_non-508.pdf
  7. Sundar IK, Javed F, Romanos GE, Rahman I. Oncotarget. 2016 Oct 24. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.12857  E-cigarettes and flavorings induce inflammatory and pro-senescence responses in oral epithelial cells and periodontal fibroblasts
  8. https://askthedentist.com/how-e-cigarettes-affect-oral-health/
  9. http://www.ingeniousdentistry.com/how-vaping-affects-your-teeth/

 

 

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January 30th, 2018

How To Take Care Of Your Dentures

Category: dental health

hagen dental dentures

Dentures are a fantastic option for anyone who has lost some or all of their teeth. Dentures benefit both your appearance and your health in a variety of ways. The loss of teeth can impact daily activities like smiling, eating, and speaking. These things are easy to take for granted until a problem arises.

Dentures improve eating and speaking ability (after some practice) by restoring the dimensions of your oral cavity. They also give the wearer a full set of teeth for a wide, confident smile. They can be made to mimic the look of natural teeth, and serve to support the cheeks, lips, and facial muscles to keep the facial tissues from sagging and creating a more aged look (1).

Caring For Dentures

Just like natural teeth, dentures require good daily oral hygiene habits to keep your mouth free of infection, irritation and complications. Regular cleaning also prevents denture stains and bacteria buildup (2).

Clean Your Dentures Every Day

You wouldn’t skip brushing your teeth daily – nor should you skip brushing and cleaning your dentures! Ideally, you should clean your dentures after each meal, but at a minimum, this should be done when you take them out every night.

To clean, remove the denture from your mouth and rinse off any food particles. Brush the denture gently using denture cleaning and a brush specially designed for cleaning dentures. You could also use a soft-bristled toothbrush. The key is to avoid any damage to the dentures that harder bristles could cause (1).

Avoid Using Toothpaste On The Dentures

Although dentures are used as replacement teeth, they are composed of different material than bone, so different cleaning applications are required. A non-abrasive cleanser – such as gentle liquid dish soap – is effective on dentures. Toothpaste, bleach, and powdered household cleansers, however, often contain abrasive particles that can damage the denture base or the denture teeth, so these should never be used to clean your dentures (2, 3).

Because denture cleaners are not designed to use in the mouth, be sure to rinse the denture well after cleaning or soaking it. Some of the chemicals from the soap may not be suitable for ingestion. We recommend denture cleansers that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. This symbolizes safety and effectiveness (1).

Handle With Care

Your dentures can be delicate! Dropping them onto a hard surface can result in cracks, chips, or breakage. We recommend standing over a sink filled with water or over a folded towel while you are cleaning the denture to avoid damage if you accidentally drop it (2).

Keep Your Dentures Wet

While your denture is out of your mouth, store it in water or a denture cleansing solution. Alternatively, you could use a solution of half water and half mouthwash. A denture that dries out can lose its shape, warp, or lose its pliability. Avoid storing it in hot water, which can also warp its shape (2).

Avoid Denture Adhesives

There are instances in which denture adhesive could be helpful. However, a typical denture should seal to the gums with just a light layer of saliva and a good fit. If you find you are requiring adhesive to comfortably wear your dentures, it could signal adjustments or replacement is necessary (2).

Give our office a call to schedule a check-up if this is happening to you.

cincinnati dentist

Caring For Your Mouth When You Have Dentures

Give Your Mouth A Break

To avoid irritation of the tissues covered by dentures, they should NOT be worn 24 hours a day. Typically, a good rule of thumb is to take the dentures out at bedtime and put them back in when you wake up. Ideally, your mouth should get at least 8 hours break from their wear (1, 3).

Check The Fit Regularly

Always pay attention to the fit of your dentures. If something doesn’t feel right, schedule an appointment to have it checked out. Ill-fitting dentures can cause irritation, mouth sores, or infection. We are trained to evaluate and repair any damage to the equipment, and to modify for any changes in the fit of your dentures.

Brush Like Usual

It’s still important to brush your gums, tongue, cheeks, and the roof of your mouth every morning and night, just as you used to brush your teeth. We recommend using a soft-bristled brush. This habit is helpful for increasing circulation in the oral tissues, removing plaque from the mouth, preventing bad breath, and starting the day clean before putting in your dentures (1, 3).

Diet Still Counts

Just as it is important for those with natural teeth to eat a balanced diet and avoid excessive sugars and acids, so too is this habit important for denture-wearers. A healthy diet plays a key role in the health of your mouth, whether you have a full set of natural teeth, a partial set, or a full set of dentures!

Regular Oral Exams

Even if you’ve lost all your natural teeth, regular oral exams are important. The dental examination can detect signs of disease, infection, or any changes in the health of your mouth, neck, throat, and head.

Dentures last about 5 to 10 years, and sometimes need work, alterations, and tune-ups to keep them functioning at their best. Regular dental checkups help to ensure your dentures are working best for you as changes occur in your mouth and as wear and tear happens to your dentures.

Schedule An Appointment With Hagen Dental Practice

Do you have questions about your dentures or your oral health? We are here to help with all your dental and denture needs! Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!  Or, give us a call at (513) 251-5500 today!

 

Sources:

  1. http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Publications/Files/ADA_PatientSmart_Dentures.pdf?la=en
  2. https://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/dentures
  3. https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/dentures

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January 22nd, 2018

This Is Why Cold Weather Can Hurt Your Teeth

Category: cincinnati dentist

Did you know 1 in 8 people have tooth sensitivity?

Many people notice more tooth discomfort in the cold winter months than the warmer spring and summer seasons. The cold temperatures and chilly, windy air of wintertime are here to stay for a few more months and could be to blame for some of this stinging and zinging pain.

But why? Read on as we explore some of the factors involved in this cold weather phenomenon (1).

Taking a Closer Look at Cold Weather

Your teeth are very sensitive to temperature, and can vary up to 120 degrees when exposed to different hot or cold environments as well as hot or cold foods and beverages. Like most material, teeth actually expand and contract slightly as they change temperature.

hagen cincinnati

Teeth contract with exposure to cold temperature, and then expand as they warm back to body temperature. Your teeth are able to adapt to some extent, but tiny cracks and fissures can form over time due to the stress of this movement. The cracks shouldn’t affect the integrity of your teeth, but they can cause a lot of discomfort when cold air or liquid comes into contact!

Amalgam fillings (those made of mixed metal) will actually expand and contract more rapidly than the natural bone of teeth, meaning teeth with metal fillings could hurt even more than other teeth in the bitter, cold weather (1, 2).

Exposed Layers

The enamel is the outer, protective layer of your teeth. If the enamel has started to wear away, the next layer – the dentin – becomes exposed. Dentin is very sensitive due to the nerve endings found in this layer. This layer of the tooth can sense extreme changes in temperature more readily, and will create nerve irritation without the full shelter of the enamel that is typically covering it.

Dentin exposure can be caused from the tiny cracks mentioned above, damage to the tooth, long term wear and tear from rough brushing, home whitening kits, or even highly acidic foods (1, 2).

Root exposure will also cause abrupt pain when this part of the tooth comes in contact with cold air or liquid. The root of the tooth can become exposed by brushing too hard or with cross friction. They can also become exposed due to gum recession from grinding or gum disease. Dr. Hagen can help with determining the cause of gum recession, as well as give tips on proper brushing motions (3).

Jaw Tension

It’s not uncommon to unconsciously clench your jaw in colder weather. Some people have a tendency to tighten up their muscles (often the arms, shoulders, jaws, etc.) in an attempt to keep warm. This can put unnecessary and painful pressure on your jaw and the teeth (1).

Sinus Pressure

Seasonal allergies and sinus issues can show up during cold months. Sinus infections, fluid backup and pressure in the sinuses will often cause tooth pain because of their proximity to the oral cavity and teeth. Many people will mistake this feeling as tooth pain when it is really the referral from nearby tissues. Figuring out the cause of the sinus issue will help alleviate the oral pain in this case (1).

cincinnati dentist

What to Do About Sensitivity or Pain

Tips for reducing cold weather tooth pain start with protection and prevention. Try breathing through your nose instead of your mouth, or wearing a scarf or mask over your mouth while you’re out in the elements (4).

Good oral hygiene habits are of upmost importance when it comes to preventing sensitive teeth and other painful tooth difficulties. Be sure to brush and floss regularly to reduce your risk of decay or infection.

Hagen Dental is your resource for figuring out the cause of your tooth pain. We can perform an examination and do x-rays, if needed, to discover the issue. Switching to sensitive toothpaste can often help ease the discomfort. Other times, we may recommend painting a protective varnish on any teeth that show wear and tear of the enamel and are particularly sensitive.

Though many times the pain can be an easy fix, it is extremely important to get checked. Pain, whether temperature related or not, can signal more serious underlying issues with the health of your teeth and mouth. Tooth pain can be caused from defective fillings, recessed gums, tooth grinding, infection, cavities and other problems. Often times, the cold will just exacerbate the pain that was actually caused by one of those issues.

We want to catch cavities, infection, damage, or other disease sooner than later in order to keep you healthy. Let us know if you have any pain, discomfort or other issues so that we can help!

Schedule An Appointment with Hagen Dental Practice

We are excited to meet you and your family. Please call (513) 251-5500 or click the Online Scheduling button on our website to schedule your next visit!  Or, give us a call at (513) 251-5500 today!.

Sources:

  1. http://thedentistsofficefallon.com/burr-is-cold-weather-making-your-teeth-hurt/
  2. https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/tooth-sensitivity-in-cold-weather.html
  3. http://www.familycedarrapidsdentist.com/cold-weather-effects-your-teeth
  4. https://www.carefreedental.com/resources/24-your-teeth/58-how-does-the-winter-affect-your-teeth

 

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January 17th, 2018

New Year, New Brush Head

Category: cincinnati dentist

toothbrush facts and oral health hagen dental practice in cincicnnati ohio

Can you remember the last time you changed out your toothbrush?

Maybe it was when you came in to see us!

Whether or not that was the last time you replaced your toothbrush head, here are a few of the things we think you should know about toothbrush care…

Toothbrush Replacement: Here’s What to Know

Did you know that there’s millions of bacteria growing in your mouth!? And, of course your toothbrush is a fertile breeding ground many of those viruses and bacteria, including ones that make you feel…well, not so great!

The American Dental Association recommends that you change out your toothbrush (or brush head) every 3-4 months, at minimum. If you see that the bristles look worn, its definitely time to trade out your toothbrush for a new one so it’s still working as well as it should (1)!

Here’s just a few more reasons to remember to trade out that toothbrush:

  • Your toothbrush is typically stored in the bathroom, a place with a ton of germs! By regularly switching out your toothbrush, you can help avoid some of microorganisms that may come and go in your bathroom environment. (Yes, a little gross when you stop and think about it!)
  • If you find that you often are that person getting sick in the winter, you might even want to change out your toothbrush more often than that recommendation! After all, your putting your toothbrush right in your mouth…and you are still brushing your teeth when you don’t feel great. It’s an easy step to take to stay healthy!
  • Sharing toothbrushes has been shown to also share illness and germs. That’s not too surprising! But what is surprising is that so many of us put our toothbrushes right next to another toothbrush (such as in a toothbrush holder). Because of this, you can, in theory, be exposing yourself to even more germs. Long story short: if you store your toothbrush close to someone else’s toothbrush, it’s all the more reason to regularly change out both of your brushes!

blog post hagen dental practice in cincicnnati ohiCleaning Your Current Toothbrush: The Takeaways

Although it’s not guaranteed to work or to kill off all germs, you can also clean your toothbrush itself. Some people will:

  • Use a UV toothbrush sanitizer. Now…is that the easiest route? Probably not, but it’s a choice!
  • Soak your toothbrush in antibacterial mouthwash. Before you use it again, you’ll want to rinse it off. Ask us for more details, but just know that this does not guarantee you will kill off all germs.
  • Run your toothbrush through extremely hot water for 3 minutes. The water needs to be hot enough to kill germs, so be careful that you don’t burn yourself! (Hey, if you really don’t want to buy a new brush, it’s worth a try!)

Not Even Sure Which Toothbrush Type Is Right For You?

So…you are ready to buy a new toothbrush to replace your old one?!

When it comes to a manual toothbrush versus electric, lots of people have a personal preference for one or the other, and that’s okay!

If you are thinking you might want to try or switch to an electric toothbrush, consider the Sonicare toothbrush, one that we recommend and that you can purchase from us.

With this toothbrush, you are able to improve how you clean beyond the “reach” of each of the bristles.

Thanks to its oscillating power brush, the bristles create a motion that better allows the toothbrush to get into those hard-to-reach places throughout your mouth. You can think of the technology powering the Sonicare toothbrush in two ways: First, you have a scrubbing action that keeps the surface area of your teeth as bacteria free as possible.

dentistry hagen dds blog cincinnati ohio dentist(This is the same as your manual brush.) But then there’s the second component—how the bristles are vibrating. That cleans in a way that your traditional, manual brush cannot. Imagine this: the Sonicare brush head vibrates more than 30,000 brush strokes per minute you brush! That’s more than a manual brush delivers in a month of brushing, just to compare.

A Recap On What You’ve Learned

So, to recap, it’s best to change out whatever kind of toothbrush head you have every 3-4 months. A few more tips: Don’t share your toothbrush and thoroughly rinse your toothbrush after each use. You also want to avoid covering your toothbrush regularly, which traps in germs, and it can create a moist environment where microorganisms thrive.
Have any more questions? We’d love to answer them! Keep up with your consistent professional cleanings and dental exams to ensure we can catch issues early and do our part to keep your teeth, gums, and mouth! Give us a call to schedule your next appointment at (513) 251-5500.

Source:

  1. http://www.ada.org/en/about-the-ada/ada-positions-policies-and-statements/statement-on-toothbrush-care-cleaning-storage-and-

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January 5th, 2018

What Your Tongue Says About Your Health (INFOGRAPHIC)

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Hagen-Infographic-What Your Tongue Says About Your Health

See the PDF version of the “Your Tongue Can Indicate Your State of Health” infographic here.

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December 18th, 2017

Don’t Just Dream Of A White Christmas…Do Something About It!

Category: cosmetic dentistry

tooth whitening options

This time of year is often packed with an increase in family fun, get-togethers, vacations, smiles and laughter, and more picture-taking than ever! With all those photo-ops and smiles, it’s easy to start worrying about the state of your smile. Are you dreaming of a whiter smile this Christmas?

Check out these brightening and whitening tips for whiter teeth this year and always!

Simple Tips To Whiten, Brighten, And Minimize Stains At Home

1. Use A Whitening Toothpaste

Today’s whitening toothpastes are not as harsh on your teeth as those in the past. New formulas help to whiten and brighten, as well as prevent new stains from taking hold as you sip on coffee or wine this holiday season! Ask us about specifics based on your oral health.

2. Try An Electric Toothbrush

Did you know that the vibration of an electric toothbrush can help prevent bacteria from sticking to surfaces in your mouth? No matter what brush you’re using, be sure to replace the bristles every three months. (Or sooner if you see signs of wear and tear and bent bristles). Worn bristles don’t clean as well, meaning particles can remain and cause stains or damage to your enamel.

3. Brush Your Tongue, Too!

Your tongue can accumulate bacteria, just like any other part of your mouth. This can contribute to discoloration on teeth surfaces. Be sure to rinse your brush well after brushing, so that it is fresh for next time (1).

4. Rinse After Acidic Foods Or Beverages

Acidic foods and beverages, such as citrus fruits and soda, can leave behind damaging acid on the teeth. Rinse your mouth with cool water to wash away any residue and prevent erosion. Bacteria buildup and damage can also occur from sugary juices and sports drinks, so drink them in moderation and rinse afterwards too.

5. Sip With A Straw

Beverages that have a tendency to stain your teeth, such as iced tea, coffee, fruit juices, or even sodas are a common source of discoloration. The stains these beverages cause occur slowly, over time, and can seem to sneak up on you after years of usage. The next time you’re out shopping, buy some straws – and start sipping through a straw to minimize the contact these drinks have with your tooth enamel (1, 3).

6. Choose Lipstick Wisely

Do you enjoy wearing lipstick or gloss? Color tints containing cherry reds, wine hues, and blue tones give the effect of making teeth look whiter. Stay away from orange undertones in your lip color, which can bring out the yellow appearance of your teeth (1).

7. Fruits And Vegetables

Diets high in fruits and vegetables have been shown to benefit both your body and your teeth. Crunchy, raw fruits and veggies like celery, apples and carrots help rub away plaque as you chew. They also cause increased saliva production in the mouth, which helps neutralize acidity, wash away bacteria, and keep the mouth fresher.

Strawberries and pineapple have been found to be particularly helpful in keeping the teeth white and bright, though studies show they are more helpful for prevention than removal of stains (2, 3).

Professional Tips For Whiter, Brighter Smiles

Professional whitening, depending on your exact needs, is one of the best way to get teeth as white as possible. You’ll see results faster and more fully than with the daily habits and tips we’ve discussed so far. If you want significant results, we recommend getting a professional whitening treatment, then maintaining your results to prevent new stains with the tips listed above for as long as possible. Here is what to expect with a professional whitening service at our office:

Zoom Whitening

Zoom whitening is the top professional whitening procedure for several reasons. It’s fast, easy, and pain-free, and you see results in just one visit. It has been shown to be safe and effective, without harm to the other tissues in the mouth.

Ask us about our whitening program called “Whitening for Life.” With a one-time fee, you will receive custom-fitted whitening trays along with our professional-strength whitening gel! Twice yearly, at the completion of your hygiene visits, you’ll receive free whitening gel for as long as you remain a patient of record.

Here’s what that means: You can have a brilliantly white smile, free from staining or darkness. And the best part is that you will be able to maintain your white smile for a lifetime!

hagen dental cincinnati

Maintain Your Procedure With Healthy Habits

After any whitening procedure, it’s important to keep up with regular dental hygiene habits and maintenance for better and longer results. This means brushing and flossing daily. And don’t forget to rinse with water after dark or staining foods and drinks.

It also means keeping on schedule with your regular professional dental cleanings. And, as described, another benefit of being a practice member at our office: Our “Whitening for Life” program that will keep your teeth oh so white! (4).

We Are Ready To Help You Have A White Christmas & New Year!

merry christmas white teeth

We’re wishing you a Merry Christmas and happy holiday season! We’re here to answer questions, help you make the best decision for your goals, or schedule your next whitening procedure. Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. https://toilettreeproducts.com/11-tips-to-whiten-your-teeth/
  2. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/whiten-teeth-naturally#section3
  3. https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/ss/slideshow-10-secrets-to-whiter-teeth
  4. https://www.bustle.com/articles/177437-6-teeth-whitening-tips-to-follow-for-a-brighter-smile-according-to-a-celebrity-dentist

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December 12th, 2017

Pucker Up! Don’t Make This Mistake Under the Mistletoe

Category: cincinnati dentist

What’s The Mistletoe Tradition All About?

Did you ever wonder how the custom of kissing under mistletoe came to be? This tradition has roots that stem way back, and today’s tradition was shaped over time from several historical beliefs and practices surrounding the little herb.

Several ancient cultures touted the healing properties of mistletoe for various ailments, lending to its popularity. In the first century, it became a romantic symbol of vivacity and fertility amongst Celtic Druids, because it could blossom even during the cold of winter (1).

During Medieval times, mistletoe was thought to possess mystical powers that would bring good luck and ward off evil spirits during the month of December. It became a popular December decoration due to the beliefs about its power (2).

cincinnati dentist

Mistletoe was also considered and declared a symbol of love and friendship in Norse mythology, which led to the tradition of “stealing a kiss” under the mistletoe.

The tradition of kissing under the mistletoe is said to have caught on in England. Before Christmas trees were popular, a common decoration was a “Kissing Bunch”, or “Kissing Bough”. These were wooden hoops, composed of holly, ivy, rosemary, bay, fir, or other evergreen plants, and shaped into a ball. Apples, candles or ribbons were often used to decorate these boughs. The finishing touch on these bunches was a large mistletoe hung from the bottom (3).

The original custom stated that before you kissed someone, you had to pick a berry from the sprig of mistletoe. Once all the berries were gone, no more kissing was allowed (2)!

Don’t Be Caught With Bad Breath Under The Mistletoe

No matter where the tradition stemmed from, it’s engrained in our culture today. And with the holiday season upon us, you just might find yourself standing under a sprig of mistletoe at your next social gathering! We have tips to help you avoid being caught off guard with bad breath so that you’ll be ready for your next smooch under the mistletoe!

kissable breath dental tips

10 Ways To Stay “Kiss-ably” Fresh

The easiest way to stay fresh and “kiss-ready” is to adopt great oral hygiene habits and keep your oral cavity healthy. This prevention-minded attitude will help you maintain the freshness of your mouth and avoid problems that can creep up and lead to smelly breath. Check out this list of tips to keep your breath fresh (4)!

1. Brush Daily

You should always brush your teeth twice a day, for at least two minutes each time. This removes plaque, debris and harmful bacteria before it can accumulate and cause damage.

2. Floss Daily

Flossing reaches the third of the tooth’s surface that can’t be reached by brushing alone. If food and debris isn’t removed from between teeth, bacteria will grow and odors will develop.

3. Brush Your Tongue

Brushing or scraping your tongue will keep the folds and taste buds on the surface of the tongue clean and free of residue.

4. Mouthwash

Rinsing with mouthwash can help decrease the amount of odor-causing bacteria in the mouth. A mouth rinse can also temporarily mask the odor of an underlying dental issue. Keep in mind that we can help determine the cause of the odor and offer treatment if needed.

5. Visit Us

Regular visits to your dentist are crucial in maintaining proper oral health. These exams also give us a chance to detect any oral hygiene issues that could cause or lead to bad breath early on.

6. Avoid Tobacco

Tobacco products contribute to bad breath, dry out your mouth, and leave unpleasant smells that linger – even after you’ve brushed your teeth. We recommend quitting your use of tobacco.

7. Stay Hydrated

Dry mouth conditions can lead to bad breath. Staying hydrated with plenty of water will not only keep your mouth from becoming too dry; it will also help wash away food particles and bacteria that would otherwise lead to bad odors.

8. Chew Sugarless Gum

Wondering what to do if you are stuck somewhere and unable to brush before a social event? Sugarless gum can help stimulate saliva production and wash away food debris.

9. Munch On Fiber

Fibrous foods such as carrots, celery, apples and nuts are great low-sugar snacks to help keep teeth clean and increase your saliva production, minimizing bad breath.

10. Quick Rinse

Swishing with a quick rinse of water is another option if you are unable to brush after eating or drinking a particularly sugary meal or beverage. Swishing water is not a replacement for brushing, but can help knock down sugar buildup that would otherwise help feed odor-causing bacteria in the mouth until you are home and able to brush your teeth properly.

Regular Dentist Appointments Are Important, Too!

Keeping consistent with your professional cleanings and dental exams ensures we can catch issues early and do our part to keep your teeth, gums, and tongue healthy and ensure your breath stays fresh – all year round! Give us a call to schedule at (513) 251-5500.

 

Sources:

  1. http://www.history.com/news/ask-history/why-do-we-kiss-under-the-mistletoe
  2. https://www.whychristmas.com/customs/mistletoe.shtml
  3. https://www.whychristmas.com/customs/hollyandivy.shtml#kissingbough
  4. https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/fighting-bad-breath.html

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December 4th, 2017

Mouth Sores: The Basics You Should Know

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

cincinnati dentist

True dental health involves the entire mouth, so we’re trained to examine and identify problems with all the tissues of the mouth! Sores and irritations are common occurrences in the mouth.

Read on to learn about the most common oral sores, some of their causes, what you can do, and more.

Causes Of Mouth Sores

Sores in the mouth can stem from a variety of causes, including:

  • Infections from bacteria, viruses or fungus (1).
  • Irritation from a broken tooth, filling, piercing, loose orthodontic wire or other sharp appliance, or a denture that doesn’t fit (1).
  • Sores can be a symptom of a greater disease or disorder (1).
  • Immune system challenges and problems (2).

cincinnati dentist

The Most Common Mouth Sores

1. Canker Sores:

Canker sores develop in the soft tissues of the mouth, including the tongue, gums, uvula, or insides of the cheeks. They are typically white or gray sores with a red border. The good news about canker sores is they are NOT contagious. Their cause is hard to pinpoint, but could be related to other immune issues, oral hygiene issues, food irritation, stress, bacteria, viruses, or even trauma to the soft tissue (2).

Canker sores will typically heal on their own; however, it can take several days up to two weeks. If they are painful or causing problems with eating or talking, over-the-counter mouthwashes and pain killers designed for this type of sore can provide relief and help during the healing process. While a canker sore is healing, spicy, acidic, and overly salty foods should be avoided to minimize irritation and pain (2).

 2. Cold Sores:

Cold sores are also known as fever blisters. They present as a group of fluid-filled blisters around the lips, under the nose, or even around the chin. Cold sores are caused by the herpes simplex type 1 virus, and are VERY contagious. The initial infection of this virus will often be confused with a cold or flu. The main difference is that painful sores and lesions will emerge throughout the mouth (3).

Once a person is infected, the virus stays in the body and will cause periodic attacks. Some people notice that stress or other immune challenges can bring on an eruption. Cold sores will usually heal in about a week by themselves. If the blister is painful, over-the-counter topical medications can provide some pain relief. If the breakouts are severe or frequent, we can also prescribe antiviral drugs (3).

3. Thrush:

Thrush is a fungal infection that occurs when the yeast known as Candida albicans becomes overgrown in the oral cavity. It can reproduce rapidly in large numbers, causing an overgrowth and subsequent thrush infection (4).

Thrush is most common in people with weakened immune systems, in which the body’s own defenses can’t keep the Candida albicans in check. This population includes the very young, the elderly, or those who are affected by other diseases, such as diabetes or leukemia. Dry mouth syndromes and denture use both also make thrush more likely. Another risk factor is antibiotic treatment, which decreases the normal bacterial flora in the mouth, and gives Candida yeast a chance to flourish (4).

The best way to prevent and control thrush is focusing on good oral hygiene as well as controlling or preventing the conditions that make Candida more likely to reproduce rapidly (4).

cincinnati dentist4. Leukoplakia:

Leukoplakia are patches that form on the inside of the cheeks, gums or tongue. They are thick and whitish in color. They are caused by excessive cell growth (5).

Leukoplakia can result from irritations in the mouth, such as ill-fitting dentures or appliances, or in the case of people who are in the habit of chewing on the insides of the cheeks. These lesions are also common among tobacco users. Leukoplakia can, in some cases, be associated with oral cancer. We need to evaluate the lesion and might recommend a biopsy if the leukoplakia patch looks dangerous (5).

Removing and quitting those irritations that can result in leukoplakia are the first steps in treatment. For example, quitting tobacco or replacing anything ill-fitting appliances in the mouth are one of the first recommendations when dealing with leukoplakia from these causes (5).

We Are Here To Help!

While none of this is medical advice, these are some of the basics to know about when it comes to mouth sores. All mouth sores that last longer than a week should be examined by a dentist! Have you noticed new or recent sores in your mouth? Do you have a question about an unusual change in your oral soft tissue? It’s important that you have us analyze and take a look to rule out anything sinister or life-threatening. Whether for your next appointment or for another reason, be sure to give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/m/mouth-sores
  2. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/c/canker-sores
  3. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/c/cold-sores
  4. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/thrush
  5. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/l/leukoplakia

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November 29th, 2017

Understanding Your Teeth: Each Tooth Has A Job To Do!

Category: cincinnati dentist

Have you ever wondered why we have so many varied teeth? What are all the types of teeth that make up our smile? These different shapes and sizes aren’t by accident – they all play a role! Teeth are important for and have various roles in chewing and digesting food, support aspects of our facial structure, and play a part in our speech and language capabilities (1,2).

cincinnati dentist

Types of Teeth

A full set of adult teeth include 32 permanent teeth, including the four wisdom teeth. These 32 teeth can be divided into four categories: incisors, canines, premolars, and molars (3).

Incisors

Incisors are the thin teeth with a sharp biting surface located in the front of the mouth. There are four on the top and four on the bottom. They are the teeth that comprise the majority of our visible smile (1,4).

These front teeth are used primarily for taking initial bites of food, cutting or shearing food into smaller chewable pieces, and pulling the food into our mouths. They also play an important role in proper speech and pronunciation as we speak. Additionally, they support the lip tissues (2, 3, 4).

Incisors are also the very first to arrive in the mouth, both in their primary form (baby teeth) and permanent, adult form (1, 4).

Canines

Canines are also known as Cuspids, or “fangs” for slang. These are located just behind the incisors, at the “corners” of the dental arches, and are our longest type of tooth. There are two canines in the top row and two on the bottom – one on each side, respectively. These are the sharpest of all the teeth, with very jagged, pointed biting surfaces. Their function is to grip food and tear it apart, as well as help guide the mouth and jaw into the best biting position (1,3,4).cincinnati dentist

Premolars

Moving further back into the mouth, we get to the premolars, which are also known as Bicuspids. These teeth have a flatter biting surface. They are used primarily for tearing, crushing, and grinding food during chewing. This part of the chewing process makes food more easily consumable and more easily swallowed. There are a total of eight premolars (1, 3, 4).

Molars

There are a total of twelve molars, including the wisdom teeth. They come in sets of four and are termed “first molars”, “second molars”, and “third molars”. Molars are the largest of all the teeth. Similar to the premolars, they have a large, flat biting surface. The function of all twelve molars is to chew, crush and grind food (1,3).

The wisdom teeth are the four molars which are often termed “third molars”, since they erupt into the mouth last; typically in the late teen years (although some people never develop them at all)! Many people get their wisdom teeth removed if they do not have enough room for them; they are located so far back in the jaw that they can cause crowding issues or bite misalignments if they are left to grow in (1, 4).

Some people consider wisdom teeth to actually be a fifth category of tooth. However, for functional classification, wisdom teeth fall into the “molar” category. For those who have room to allow their third molars to grow in, these teeth are used for chewing, crushing and grinding food – just like the other eight molars (1, 3).

A Clean And Healthy Mouth Is Good For Your Body!

Oral health is not only important for a great looking smile! The health of your teeth plays a role in ensuring ease of eating and digestion, proper speech, proper facial structure, and of course and plays a part in your overall health. At Hagen, we know the importance of keeping all your teeth healthy and strong – no matter what their shape or size. Give us a call at (513) 251-5500.

Sources:

  1. https://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/basics/types-teeth-how-they-function/
  2. http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/basics/mouth-and-teeth-anatomy/article/four-different-types-of-teeth-plus-more-0115
  3. https://www.dentalhealth.ie/children/toothdevelopment/types.html
  4. https://aci.edu/five-types-human-teeth-function/

 

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