Phone (513) 251-5500
January 22nd, 2015

How Much Do Straight Teeth Really Matter?

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

invisalign at Hagen Dental CincinnatiWhat’s the first thing people notice about someone else’s appearance?

If you guessed someone’s smile, then you are right. Our smile is usually the first thing someone else notices when they first see us. Beyond having that healthy smile that can look great, there are quite a few other benefits of having straight teeth that can leave us feeling great as well. Here are some of those benefits:

Improved self-concept.

Having straightened teeth impacts how we actually think and view ourselves. Beyond just vanity or increased confidence, crooked teeth can cause speech impediments, or just make us extremely self-conscious.

How straight our teeth are also impacts how we are perceived as well.

Did you know that people who have straight teeth are perceived as more successful, smarter and as having more dates? Having straight teeth also means you are more likely to be hired! You can see why how other people’s perceptions of us help shape our social and psychological wellbeing.

Increased ability to clean teeth.

Overlapping teeth can trap food particles, whereas straight, aligned teeth can mean the surface area is easier to both brush and floss effectively. Straighter teeth also translate to an easier and more smooth flossing and brushing experience—which means we’re also more likely to brush and floss each day. Talk about a win-win!

Overall healthier teeth and gums.

When we have teeth that stick out or protrude, these teeth are more likely to break or see cracks. Additionally, overly crowded teeth can wear unevenly, and this uneven wear can result in headaches. Crooked teeth can push against the soft tissues we have in our mouth, making cuts, sores, and infections more likely. Last, if we’re better able to fight bacteria build-up with straighter, more properly aligned teeth, we’re also better able to avoid gum disease.

“I’m ready for straighter, more symmetrical teeth.”

You’re ready for the chance to smile with confidence. Or maybe your teeth have just moved as you’ve grown older, and you’re ready to do something about it. One of the reasons Invisalign is popular is that the aligners used are nearly invisible. These clear aligners are also removable, and you can still eat food as you normally would.

Here are a few of the top things to know about Invisalign—whether you are a teen or adult:

  • You’re able to continue to floss and brush like normal (just take off your aligners!)
  • Trays are smooth and comfortable, and easy to take off
  • Ideal for a busy person
  • Fast and convenient compared to other methods of teeth straightening; typical people use a new aligner every two weeks

With our mouth being a window to the health of our entire body, it is no wonder that our smile says so much about us. Ready to learn more about Invisalign? Contact us to hear more about why parents, teens, and even brides are so excited about using Invisalign.

Sources:

  • http://www.invisalign.com/news-and-events/2012/straight-teeth-study
  •  http://keltonglobal.com/invisalign-smile-study
  • http://www.sharecare.com/health/dental-oral-health-teeth/health-guide/dental-health-teeth-gums-mouth/straighten-teeth-with-adult-orthodontics

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 11th, 2015

Everything You Need to Know About the Gum Disease Antibiotic, ARESTIN

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Gum disease, also called periodontal disease, is a bacterial infection. Gum disease can do damage to our gums, tissue, and even the bone around our teeth. When we lose and destruct the tissue and bone in this way, pockets tend to form around our teeth. This is when ARESTIN can be utilized to better the health of your mouth and gumline.

What is ARESTIN?

ARESTIN is an antibiotic you can receive through your dentist. ARESTIN works to kill the bacteria—right at the root of the problem—without any pain.

ARESTIN is made up of the antibiotic known as minocycline hydrochloride; this is what kills your bacteria, over time, so that your gums can heal quicker and more effectively than they would otherwise.

Why use ARESTIN?

As you know, bacteria is what causes gum disease and bacteria often build up around our gumline. ARESTIN is a targeted gum disease treatment that directly helps this combat this buldup. We would tell you if you were a candidate for this treatment.

In other words, ARESTIN is just one more proactive way you can reverse the damage and prevent future damage to your mouth.

How does ARESTIN work?

Getting ARESTIN is an easy process. Your dentist will place ARESTIN in the pockets below your gumline, which lets you have an optimal potency right where you need the treatment. After that point, your dentist will tell you if you need more treatments, and how often.

What happens after my ARESTIN treatment?

ARESTIN will dissolve on its own so there is no removal required. You’ll also want to keep any other future appointments we have with you to make sure your gums are as healthy as possible.

Arestin and other technology at Hagen DentalOnce your gums have been treated, you want to maintain a good oral health routine. For about 10 days, it is best to avoid using floss or any kind of picks that are normally used to clean between the teeth. We will discuss these, and other guidelines for taking care of your teeth when using ARESTIN with each individual person.

In general, after those first 10 days, this may mean we need to get in the habit of regular, daily flossing. It also means keeping up with your regular brushing habits. We can help you with other decisions that can help your oral health, and overall health. Ready to treat your gum disease head on? Tell us you are interested in this antibiotic today.

Sources:

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 3rd, 2015

New Year’s Resolutions—How to Set Yourself up for Success

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Oral and total body health

Each New Year’s, one out of every two of us will make New Year’s resolutions. (Sources: Psychology Today and Journal of Clinical Psychology.) According to researchers, usually the first two weeks of starting any new new at this time of year, goes pretty smoothly.

Then, after just four weeks—by February—people start so slip, and old habits start to creep back in.

Maybe it is quitting smoking, eating healthier foods, starting to floss regularly, losing weight, or starting to exercise. Whatever the change in behavior may be, how come it can be so difficult to keep our resolutions?

1. We actually aren’t intrinsically motivated to change our behaviors. 

Professor of Psychology Timothy Pychyl explains how sometimes, resolutions are a bit of cultural procrastination. In certain situations, he argues that we make a resolution to show that we are committed to changing certain behaviors. In reality, we don’t yet have the real, intrinsic motivation required for long-term change.

In other words, Pychyl asserts that we create a resolution to motivate ourselves, instead of being motivated, and then changing our behaviors as a result. With a real lack of motivation at the core of our intentions, we end up failing to break our habits.

2. We set unrealistic goals or expectations.

Another concept for why we can fail to keep resolutions has been deemed the false hope syndrome. Psychology professor Peter Herman and colleagues assert that we make goals that can be greatly out of alignment with our real view of ourselves. In some cases, the resolution just may be significantly unrealistic.

In the end, making a goal that we can only hope for doesn’t mean we give ourselves a chance to really change our ingrained habits.

So what should we do to fight these two common traps people often fall into? 

First, be realistic with your goals. If you aren’t exercising at all, don’t expect yourself to be able to exercise 5 days a week. Also, set yourself up for decision-making so you can ease yourself into making the right choices each day.

For example, if you are giving up soda, perhaps gradually give it up, instead of going “cold turkey.”

Have a friend or colleague help you set goals that can be accurate, and that can be adjusted over time as you incrementally find success. Remember that the more you believe you can effect and maintain change, the more success you are likely to have, a concept that’s backed by science.

Next, be sure to choose a resolution you truly find value in.

If you aren’t ready to start eating vegetables every day, it’s going to be hard to maintain change over time.  Consider writing down all the underlying reasons why you want to change a certain aspect of your life, and that can help narrow down a worthy behavior change.

Start preparing, and then acting on, your intentions.

Approach any resolution as a process. Just like your oral hygiene and other health-related habits, habits and our resulting sustainable lifestyle choices are what we do over time. One day off, or one day without a certain activity, doesn’t “make or break” our routine. By seeing our resolution as a process of change, we are better able to enter the actual “action” stage that comes with so many of our resolutions.

Ready to have better oral hygiene this year? Give us a call today.

Other Sources

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

December 10th, 2014

Top Tips to Avoid a Dental Emergency During the Holidays

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

The winter holidays are a time filled with family, gift giving, and a time to enjoy some of our favorite foods and treats. During this season, we also see a few common food offenders that can result in dental emergencies.

Take a look at the biggest offenders:

1. Popcorn.

Maybe you’ve snacked on Grandma’s caramel popcorn, or even received some gourmet popcorn as a gift. Either way, popcorn makes the list because of the “shells” that seem to wedge their way into hard-to-reach areas near and around your gum. Sometimes we don’t even know a “shell” is in our gumline or between our teeth. Also, popcorn can be problematic because of the risk of chomping down on a piece that has not fully popped. Imagine how we can shock the teeth as we bite down—pretty hard in many cases—on what the mouth feels is soft food. Unknowingly, we can come across a hard, un-popped piece, and crack or damage our teeth in the process. If you do have to eat your share of caramel popcorn this year, try to be careful as you chew. Also be sure to floss and brush after to remove those “shells” that you might not even realize are in or around your gum and teeth.

hagen dental dental emergencies 2. Baguettes or Biscotti.

It’s no secret that many people like to indulge in pastries during this time of the year. The only problem when you sink your teeth into a hard or extra crisp pastry, is that you run the risk of cracking or damaging your teeth as a result. Just think of it as one hard surface hitting another hard surface. Aim to make sure your bites are small so you don’t compromise your fillings. Sometimes ensuring you do not eat your pastry too fast can also help.

 3. Sticky and gooey desserts and candies.

Peanut brittle anyone? Or maybe it’s that bowl of jelly beans laying out at the office party? Or maybe Grandmas’ brownies with caramel on top? Whatever your favorite winter or holiday treat is, often times it’s something gooey or sticky! Realize these hard or sticky substances can stick to your teeth, and then pull out (or partially remove) a crown, bridge, or a filling. Other treats can actually get stuck in between your teeth. If you eat any of these this holiday season, continue your good oral hygiene habits, including brushing your teeth and flossing.

4. Jerky or other “tough” snack meats.

Even though our teeth’s enamel is extremely strong, we still get ourselves into trouble when we snack on chewy, dry meats—most notably beef or turkey jerky. Sometimes people can be guilty of treating their teeth as if they were determined to rip apart a piece of tough jerky. Well, our teeth can’t be treated like tools. They may be strong, but we still shouldn’t be reckless as we eat. Instead, look to savor food, which means chewing and biting off smaller size bites. If your jerky is too tough to eat comfortably, you know you might have to look for a more tender kind of meat to snack on.

This year for the holidays, be mindful as you select your holiday treats—meaning what you choose to eat, and how you go about eating it!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

November 25th, 2014

Did the Pilgrims and Native Americans Have Good Oral Hygiene Habits?

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Pilgrims and Native Americans Oral health

Back in 1620, when the Mayflower landed on the shores of Cape Cod, people did not have the access, or information, that we have in terms of our overall health and wellbeing. In fact, the life expectancy of people during this time was anywhere between 35 and 40 years, on average. Today our average life expectancy is around 78.

Oral hygiene routines were much different for our ancestors.

Today we call the settlers who landed on Plymouth Harbor the Pilgrim Fathers, or simply the Pilgrims. Back then, the pilgrims did not have toothpaste, or even what we’d recognize as a toothbrush (more on that to come!). In fact these two core components of good oral hygiene habits had not entirely been refined yet. Nylon toothbrushes were only created in the 1930s and fluoride-enriched toothpaste came in the 1950s.

Having a reliable way to clean teeth would have been a luxury then, although Pilgrims did learn some from the Native Americans.

Pilgrims would use salt, sticks or other objects they had access to in order to do their best to clean their teeth. According to some historians, some even used hog’s hair, or other animal hair, to make what would resemble a toothbrush.

These brushes were an effort to try to clean at the buildup on their teeth. Knowing all of this, it probably wouldn’t surprise you to know that Pilgrims faced mouths full of decay!

How did Native Americans Compare to the Pilgrims When it Came to Dental Health?

Compared to Pilgrims, it has been reported the Native Americans had less plaque and dental decay, generally speaking.

Some Native American tribes took care of their teeth by using combinations of herbs and sage—they used these in ways comparable to how we use toothbrushes today. Also, a tarragon and sage combination worked as a breath freshener for the Native Americans. It’s also been recorded that certain Native American tribes took the Cucacua plant and made a paste that was used in a way similar to our current-day toothpaste.

And what else contributed to the difference in oral health between the two groups?

Diet! Recall that these first Pilgrims had just come across the Atlantic, on a ship where they had relied on food that could be preserved as long as possible. Compare that to how Native Americans were maintaining a steady diet off the land, or more of what we might see as whole foods today. When you compare the salted dried meat, dried fruits and hardtack (the Pilgrims’ diet) to that of meat, nuts, berries, and other vegetables (the Native Americans’ diet), you can see why the Native Americans were better at combating gingivitis and tooth decay.

You can see how far we’ve come since the time of the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Indians’ harvest celebration, or what we know of as the “first Thanksgiving.” We know one thing: we sure are thankful this Thanksgiving to have good teeth care in reach!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

November 15th, 2014

How Acid Reflux Can Damage Your Teeth

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Dental erosion: it’s when acids wear away at the enamel on our teeth.

Eating lots of acidic foods is one of the major reasons we see erosion. Once this erosion occurs, the teeth can look shiny and a bit deficient compared to the parts of our teeth that do not have erosion.

When we lose or damage our enamel, it cannot be brought back. This erosion is a problem because our enamel is what gives our teeth their structure, and shape. We then see the underlying dentin being exposed.

Hagen Dental DDS BlogIt’s safe to say that most of us want to avoid any loss of tooth structure. So what are some signs you may have tooth erosion? Here are a few:

  • Sensitivity
  • Change in tooth form/shape
  • Cracks in the edges of teeth
  • Small dent-like appearances on your teeth
  • Discoloration
  • “Transparent” looking teeth

Knowing that acid reflux directly contributes to teeth erosion, let’s examine acid reflux a bit more.

What’s acid reflux and how does it happen?
We have a muscular ring between the end of our esophagus and our stomach. This ring is what helps keep our day-to-day stomach acid within the stomach, where it helps us digest properly. In some situations, this sphincter muscle does not work as it should, and as a result, our stomach acid comes up into our esophagus. (Sometimes you’ll hear this muscle called the LES, short for the lower esophageal sphincter muscle.)

But is this muscle all to blame as the cause of acid reflux? The answers is that as much as 90 percent of most heartburn cases are due to the foods/beverages we eat, meaning that for many of us, we are able to avoid or keep our heartburn to a minimum.

Besides being a major culprit for teeth erosion, acid reflux also contributes to bad breath. That’s just one more reason to be aware of how we to work to avoid acid reflux.

One of the ways to avoid tooth erosion (and of course the discomfort) that come with acid reflux is to look at the foods you are eating, as well as when you are eating them.

Although it varies from person to person, we compiled a list of some of the biggest offenders.

  • Meats, with especially acid sauces or chicken/buffalo wings
  • Grains, especially those with tomato sauces added
  • Dairy, including sour cream and even ice cream
  • Specialty drinks such as coffee, liquor, wine or tea
  • Fats, certain oils, and sweets. This can be chocolate, donuts, butter cookies, or even potato chips.

This list shows that across all categories of food, we can find highly acid foods and drinks that can contribute to acid reflux.

So what’s missing from this list?

You guessed it: juices, fruits, and vegetables. Most of us recognize how orange juice, lemons, lemonade, grapefruit juice, cranberry juice, tomato or raw onions are some of the foods that are also on this list.

In general, look to neutralize the acid in your stomach when acid reflux does occur, and also be sure to tell us if you are having a problem. If you do have extreme gastric-related issues, or a chronic problem with acid reflux, we can also help. Also be sure to tell us if you smoke, since that’s a major contributor to acid reflux that leads to teeth erosion for many people. Link to hagendds.com

Look to cut back on the number of acidic foods you are snacking on throughout the day. This way, you are minimizing the amount of time acid is exposed to your teeth.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

November 4th, 2014

From 1 to 100—Taking Care of Our Teeth Throughout Life

Category: cincinnati dentist

Do you want to live until you are 100?

Take a moment and imagine the state of your teeth and overall health at that age…

Truth be told, it can be hard for us to even imagine life at that age, let alone the state of our oral health at that point.

Start by imagining the current state of your teeth. Let’s imagine you are cavity-free and have healthy teeth and gums. Also imagine that you have very little tooth sensitivity, you have good daily oral health habits, and you feel confident about your smile each day.

Now just envision how much longer we want this state of oral health to last. With that in mind, let’s examine how we can maintain a healthy smile for a lifetime.

Childhood: Setting Our Families Up For Good Health

One of the great reasons you have a family dentist is the guidance we can provide you for your baby as she grows. You will truly lead the process for children until they take over the daily oral hygiene process for themselves.

One tip is keeping beverages away from young children at night. Bottles and sippy cups leave sugar or other substances exposed to our children’s teeth…all night long if they take it with them to bed! When our baby’s teeth are exposed to that sugar or beverage all night it can speed up decay.

Adolescence: Adult Teeth Are In

These are the years that many of us get our wisdom teeth removed. Also at this stage, we have our adult teeth fully in, and we’ve become accustomed to taking care of them. We’re starting to create dietary habits that can have a lasting impact on our health, including our oral health, at this time.

Flossing can seem like a pain to children who haven’t yet made it a part of their routine, but the bacteria in-between teeth is just as important to get rid of as the bacteria we’re removing when we brush. Let children know that 30-40 percent of our teeth’s surface area is in-between teeth.

Young Adulthood

During this stage of life, many people are moving away from home to go to college, or to start a career. It’s during some of these transitions that we sometimes see lapses in regular dentist visits. Just as you’d look for a new physician or other doctor, make it a point to continue caring for your mouth during these exciting times.

Midlife: Our Past Habits Become Increasingly Evident 

Unfortunately for some, it’s at this point in many people’s lives when there can be some regret about a lack of oral hygiene in one’s past. That’s because at this age, those habits have really caught up to us. (Of course our blog readers are far less likely to have to worry about that!)

Luckily, Hagen Dental has the latest and greatest when it comes to technology and services to be sure you have the smile you deserve. We make sure you still can have a healthy mouth you can be proud of at any age.

hagen dds cincinnati ohioSenior Years

Over the years, it’s possible that our gums have receded. It’s also possible that certain medications we’ve taken over time have lessened the saliva in our mouths. Our saliva helps naturally “clean” our mouths, so over time, some of those medications may have negatively affected our teeth and gum by this stage in our lives.

Beyond inflammation or tenderness, we also see bone loss at this stage.

If gum disease eats away at the bone enough, our faces can change in appearance. If the tooth is gone, the bone reacts as if it has no reason to be in that space. That’s when we see some notable changes in the lips and cheeks area of seniors.

With longevity in mind, the best thing we can do is to regularly see a dentist to prevent and to manage what we can for the sake of our total health. Second, and just as important, is a commitment to protect our teeth each day, especially if we want them to last for the long haul.  

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

October 27th, 2014

The Wonders of Xylitol Gum—Is it All True?

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Xylitol Gum

Can tasty chewing gum also be good for our teeth and actually prevent tooth decay? We explore Xylitol chewing gum, and where you can get it.

 

What is Xylitol?

Some of us may have baked with it, and others may have noticed it is an ingredient that’s been added into some children’s toothpaste…Xylitol is a sugar alcohol that is found in small amounts in vegetable and fruit fibers.  

Because it is a sugar alcohol, it isn’t a sugar, or alcohol. You can think of it as a carbohydrate that acts similar to sugar. After all, most of us have heard of, or want to know about Xylitol, because of how it sweetens.

As a sugar substitute, Xylitol has received attention because of how it lacks some of the harmful effects that table sugar has on our health. It’s actually as sweet as table sugar, but it is metabolized as fewer calories. It also has a lower glycemic index than table sugar, which is appealing to people with certain diets, such as people with diabetes. 

Where does Xylitol come from?

As mentioned, it can be found naturally in plants. It also can be manufactured. Because it’s not classified as an artificial sweetener, food or beverages that contain Xylitol can use the words “all natural” on their label.

How does Xylitol benefit our health in comparison to other sweeteners?

Back in the 1970s, researchers looked at typical chewing gum versus Xylitol-sweetened chewing gum. What they found is that the bacteria in our mouth prefer sugar or disaccharides. Xylitol, on the other hand, is non-fermentable and has a 5-carbon structure (most carbohydrates are six-carbon monosaccharides). Researchers saw how Xylitol acted in a way where it actually worked to stop, and actually prevent bacteria reproduction.

In simple terms, that’s partially because of the unique structure it has: the Xylitol does not “link” with the other sugars in our mouth. Combine this factor with how Xylitol acts as a natural way to bring saliva into our mouths, and we have a healthy combination that helps prevent tooth decay.

What else should we know about Xylitol as a substitute for regular chewing gum?

Hagen dental

Xylitol is approved by the FDA as well as the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. If you’re looking for some of the preventive benefits of Xylitol gum, or maybe looking for a substitute for your Halloween candy this year, here are a few places that carry it:

  • Whole Foods Market
  • Trader Joes
  • Select Kroger stores in the specialty aisle
  • Online, such as Amazon or other health outlets

Be sure to confirm on the nutrition label it is Xylitol-containing gum. When consuming Xylitol, keep in mind some people can have side effects such as an upset stomach, bloating, or diarrhea because of how Xylitol is digested. (Also keep in mind it could take large quantities of consumption in order to have any negative side effects, but speak to us, or your primary care physician if you have any questions.)

Read this PDF on Xylitol for more information.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 20th, 2014

How Bad is Halloween Candy for Your Teeth?

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Just how bad is one night of trick-or-treating?

Some might be thinking about the impact eating a handful of Airheads, Gummy Worms, or Snickers and Milky Way candy bars may have when it comes to their waistlines…and that’s certainly true.

We’ve talked about before how nutrient dense foods often are foods that are also good for our oral health—imagine that!

Actually, most candy we consume on Halloween falls short when it comes to nutrient density, and they have nearly no fiber as well. (For more on the idea of nutrient density and our health, visit here.) When we’re eating a lot of candy in one sitting, it means we’re increasing our caloric intake, without any nutritional benefits, and so we’re also less likely to get in the kind of complete nutrition we should be consuming.

halloween and your teeth hagen dental cincinnati ddsTake for example Candy Corn, which is almost pure sugar. 19 pieces of the Halloween favorite offers 36 grams of carbs and 32 grams of sugar, with 140 calories. (Perhaps the name of this candy is fitting!)

Not all Candy is Created Equal

We’ve covered how candy is not a source of nutrition to fuel our bodies, but we understand that Halloween is about having a treat.

Let’s say we come home from a night of trick or treating with a bag full of Laffy Taffy, Sprees, and Warheads, among other tasty treats…

Consider how our bodies breaks down and metabolize that sugar that makes up those candies…your teeth will be exposed to what can best be described as a very acidic environment. Some of those candies are so acidic they end up burning our gums and cheeks while we chew.

What other kinds of candies create this acid that “sits” on our teeth, you ask? 

Sour Patch Kids, Licorice, Skittles, and any candy that contains caramel (and many more!) are just a few examples of candies that can cause lasting and permanent damage to our teeth.

These treats actually break down the enamel of our teeth in as little as 20 minutes…and remember, if we damage our enamel, our teeth are prone to decay.

The Chewy, Stick and Hard Truth

But keep in mind the sticky and chewy candies add another layer of potential harm for our teeth. Chewy and/or sticky candies can include Gummy Bears and related candy, Starbursts, or even Swedish Fish.

These chewy candies get stuck and stay even longer on our teeth. Of course the longer that sugar is exposed to our teeth, the more harm it can do. The same holds true for gel or powder-based candies and hard candies, such as lollipops, Jaw Breakers, or Jolly Ranchers. A general rule is that citric acid translates to tartness in our mouth…so you could say that while all sugar-based candy is harmful for our teeth and gum, the fruity flavors in particular can be even worse on our enamel.

If you ever see a candy or snack label that touts that it is fruit-based or fruit-flavored, don’t mistake that candy for being healthy or non-harmful to your teeth. In fact, those fruity flavored treats typically have very high acid levels.

Just think: some of the acid these candies produce is the equivalent of putting battery acid onto our teeth.

Can’t Avoid the Halloween Treats Altogether? Aim for Moderation

We suggest sharing with your family what eating too much candy can do to their teeth.

We don’t want to spook you, but if you want to be cavity-free, keeping the treats to a minimum is best.

Also, if you can, steer those willing to listen away from the hard and chewy candies that can do more damage in a shorter amount of time. Those sweets also happen to be the candies that are harder for our saliva to naturally break down. Look to rinse our your water and then neutralize acids if highly acidic candy has been eaten.

Sugar-free candy or gum with xylitol are examples of some substitutes that can make it feel like you aren’t missing out this year. Xylitol is a naturally occurring sugar which is better for our oral health since it won’t lead to dental erosion. We don’t expect people to completely avoid candy this Halloween. At the very least, however, we’d like our readers to make informed decisions so they know the potential impact they are having on their oral, and total body, health.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

October 9th, 2014

Why Should We Consider Using a Powered or Electric Toothbrush?

Category: cincinnati dentist, dental health

Are electric toothbrushes better than “normal” or traditional toothbrushes?

Talk about the great dental debate!

Putting aside some of the research that has been done in this area, when it comes down to electric versus manual, it’s difficult to say whether one way is (always) better than the other. Since we don’t know your unique mouth, or how you brush and floss your teeth with each approach, we prefer not to make a general statement on which is always best.

The approach you take to your overall health, and the consistency and overall effectiveness of how you take care of your teeth and gums, is really what is going to matter most.

With that said, there are many benefits of using electric toothbrushes. One of the benefits we see with many powered toothbrushes is people become more aware of the length of time that they are brushing. In some cases with a traditional toothbrush, people think they are brushing for two minutes, but less than a minute has actually passed.

Why Use a Powered Toothbrush?

Let’s take a closer look at the Sonicare toothbrush, one that we recommend and that you can purchase from us. This is a newer model of electric toothbrush design where the technology allows the toothbrush to better clean beyond the “reach” of each of the bristles. You know that part of the reason why we floss is that the bristles of a toothbrush can’t get in all the hard-to-reach places—for example, the gaps between our teeth. With the Sonicare toothbrush, thanks in part to the oscillating power brush, the bristles are creating a motion that better allows the toothbrush to get into those hard-to-reach places.

You can think of the technology powering the Sonicare toothbrush in two ways. First, you have a scrubbing action we’ve described. This is helping you keep the surface area of your teeth as bacteria free as possible. (This of course, is the same as your manual brush.) But then there’s the second component—how the bristles are vibrating, which results in a more effective cleaning action beyond the normal scrubbing action with a traditional toothbrush. Imagine this: the Sonicare brush head actually vibrates more than 30,000 brush strokes per minute you brush. That’s more than a manual brush delivers in a month of brushing.

hagen dental examines sonicareThe result is that we are better able to disrupt dental plaque between our teeth, and below the gum line.

This “bristle tip velocity” benefit is not the same with a manual method of brushing. In some situations, we also see that for those who manual brush, they brush too hard, which can be harsh on our gums over time…If that sounds like you, a Sonicare toothbrush can also help eliminate that problem.

Ready for a gentle massage of your gums? Remember there is also a Sonicare toothbrush for children. Ask us about a Philips Sonicare toothbrush and we would be happy to answer any of your questions.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,